Posts

April 25, 2015

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5:59 PM | Mental disorders do not predict violence, so please stop
When Sandy Hook happened, it was so shocking that to this day, some don’t actually believe it happened. Shortly after, something frustrating happened, the shooter was labeled with aspergers. This helped drive the mental health and violence connection to the point that Time came out with an article dispelling that myth. Even now according to […]

Elkington, K., Teplin, L., Abram, K., Jakubowski, J., Dulcan, M. & Welty, L. (2015). Psychiatric Disorders and Violence: A Study of Delinquent Youth After Detention, Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 54 (4) 302-31200000. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2015.01.002

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1:39 AM | Optogenetics: Controlling the Brain with Light
A major problem neuroscience researchers have is controlling one type of cell in the brain without effecting the function of others. Both electrodes, which stimulate the entire area in which they are inserted, and drugs, which act slower than the natural speed of the brain, are not specific enough to stimulate one particular cell type […]

April 24, 2015

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8:19 PM | Diabetes drug found in freshwater potential cause of intersex fish
A medication commonly taken for Type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish –or male fish that produce eggs. The study determined exposure to the diabetes medicine metformin causes physical changes in male fish exposed to doses similar to the amount in wastewater effluent. “In […]

Niemuth, N. & Klaper, R. (2015). Emerging wastewater contaminant metformin causes intersex and reduced fecundity in fish, Chemosphere, 135 38-45. DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.03.060

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7:20 PM | Fragile X syndrome: building a case for a treatment strategy
Decision-making time in mice. Further progress along these lines may lead to a clinical trial. The post Fragile X syndrome: building a case for a treatment strategy appeared first on Lab Land.
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5:00 PM | The Homer Simpson effect: forgetting to remember
New research suggests that the act of remembering causes forgetting of similar but irrelevant memories.Homer Simpson wasn’t a neuroscientist, but he evidently had some insight into how the brain works. In one episode of the long-running series, he explains why education is wasted on him: “Every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain,” he tells Marge. “Remember when I took that home wine-making course and I forgot how to drive?” […]
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12:02 PM | The FBI, Forensic Science, and the CSI Effect
The FBI recently acknowledged that over a two decade period prior to 2000 they used a flawed forensic technique in their investigations – hair analysis. As reported in the Washington Post: Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 [...]
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11:50 AM | How it (Mindfulness) Works? (Part 1)
Following on from our previous blog Neural mechanisms of mindfulness meditation we now use abbreviated excerpts form a very good researcher Eric Garland into how possible mindfulness helps repair, via meditation based neuroplasticity, those areas and networks of the brain which are impaired or do not function adaptively  in the addicted brain. In this review paper, they described how […]
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11:29 AM | Should science be on the agenda for the general election?
Those of you who live in the UK will by now be unable to move without seeing some reference to the looming election. This year’s ballot results are thought to be amongst the most contentious in recent history. The hot-button … Continue reading →
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10:38 AM | Mindfulness training targets neurocognitive mechanisms of addiction (Part 2).
In the second part of this excellent review paper  (1) we look at the empirical evidence is presented suggesting that MBIs ameliorate addiction by enhancing cognitive regulation of a number of key processes, including: clarifying cognitive appraisal and modulating negative … Continue reading →
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9:44 AM | How to tell if a politician is lying by Dr Raj Persaud FRCPsych
How to tell if a politician is lying   Raj Persaud   There is an old joke which asks – how to tell if a politician is lying? The answer – if they are moving their lips.   In the midst of an election campaign a more scientific answer to this vital question may be […]

April 23, 2015

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11:08 PM | GBSI Antibody Survey
Hello NIF family! The GBSI (Global Biological Standards Institute) has created a survey in order to gather valuable information in regards to how researchers view the best practices in Cell Culture Authentication and Research Antibodies. The survey aims to address challenges and barriers researchers face in implementing these practices. The Survey is available through the following […]
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10:56 PM | A peer-reviewed study finds value in peer-reviewed research
The best scoring peer-reviewed grants are associated with more papers and patents, a new study finds. But whether peer review is the best system is another question entirely.
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10:55 PM | A peer-reviewed study finds value in peer-reviewed research
A better funding score on grants is associated with more publications and patents ScicuriousScience & Society by Bethany Brookshire 6:56pm, April 23, 2015 Scientists’ ideas are tried by a jury of their peers to determine if their grants get funded. A new study asks whether that jury is really identifying the best of the best.JasonDoiy/iStockPhotoThe modern […]
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10:25 PM | Scientists create worlds first genetically modified human embryos
A funny thing happened on the way to the publisher. In a world first, China has successfully created genetically modified human embryos. It was certainly an amazing piece of scientific testing, but the paper was rejected by both Nature and Science, not because the study was flawed, or because the data was falsified, but for ethical […]

Liang, P., Xu, Y., Zhang, X., Ding, C., Huang, R., Zhang, Z., Lv, J., Xie, X., Chen, Y., Li, Y. & Sun, Y. (2015). CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing in human tripronuclear zygotes, Protein & Cell, DOI: 10.1007/s13238-015-0153-5

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8:52 PM | In case you wonder about the hiatus.
I try to post once a month. Well, I have been. Except it isn’t here but rather part of my new blogging endeavors with Fitness Cult Chronicles. They obviously have much more readership than me and rightfully so. If you feel like you have been missing out on some posts, below are a few posts […]
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7:06 PM | Why A Small Drop In Whooping Cough Vaccines Leads To A Case Upsurge
In 2012 the US saw a resurgence of pertussis (whooping cough) cases. the highest since 1955. Like in engineering, the reason a small increase in anti-science beliefs can lead to a big change in the number of cases comes down to degrees of freedom and the math of networks.read more
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6:53 PM | Whooping cough: A small drop in vaccine protection can lead to a case upsurge
In 2012 the USA saw the highest number of pertussis (whooping cough) cases since 1955. New research finds that a likely explanation for this rise in disease is a drop in the degree of vaccine protection for each vaccinated individual. The team worked with 60 years of pertussis disease data to determine what best explained the recent […]

Gambhir M, Clark TA, Cauchemez S, Tartof SY, Swerdlow DL & Ferguson NM (2015). A Change in Vaccine Efficacy and Duration of Protection Explains Recent Rises in Pertussis Incidence in the United States, PLOS Computational Biology, Other:

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6:30 PM | DNA Damage And Premature Aging - A Molecular Link
Human DNA accumulates damage over time and older bodies can't repair it as well as younger, leading to the obvious conclusion that damage builds up over time and leads to an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. DNA damage also seems to play a role in conditions called progerias, which cause premature aging. Progeria […]
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6:02 PM | No Three-Parent IVF Needed: Genome Editing In Mitochondria Prevents Disease Inheritance
A proof-of-concept study in mice showed it is possible to prevent transmission of mitochondrial disease to children without resorting to controversial cytoplasmic transfer - "three-parent" IVF. Mitochondria are known as the powerhouse of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of energy. Each cell in the body contains anywhere from 1,000 to 100,000 copies of mitochondrial DNA, which is exclusively transmitted through maternal inheritance. In most patients with mitochondrial […]
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4:00 PM | Mosquito Bites Have A Genetic Component, Finds Twins Study
The likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes could be linked to our genes, according to a recent study. Previous papers have suggested that human attractiveness to insects is based on differences in body odor or diet but there has been no clear and consistent dietary explanation. read more
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3:24 PM | Am I addicted to coffee?
Recently over coffee, my friend told me that scientists have been doing drug research wrong for years. He was referring to an article about the effects of social environment on drug taking. In the article, the author criticizes scientists, government, and media for portraying drug addiction without accounting for causes of drug addiction outside of […]
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3:19 PM | ADHD Reading Links: Crashes, Smoking and Drugs
I will be finishing up the April Brain Posts focus on ADHD next week. Looking over nearly 300 research abstracts in ADHD published over the last year, five caught my attention.Here are the five that I will review over the weekend.I post a more detailed analysis on two of the manuscripts next week.All reading links include a link to the free full-text manuscript for readers with more interest in a specific topic. Click on the title to be directed to the manuscript.Risk of Road Crashes in […]
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2:28 PM | Antibiotic Shortages Plus Antibiotic Resistance Raise Concerns About Patient Care
Increasingly, the public distrusts science and medicine. Much of the reason has been due to lawsuits, some of it has been due to strange beliefs among wealthy elites in well-defined parts of the United States. Due to popularized concerns about the safety of medicine, the approval cycle and the cost is longer than ever - billions of dollars and a dozen or more years unless a disease like Ebola gets into corporate media headlines.read more
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2:21 PM | Sensation Of Invisibility Created In The Lab
We've long been fascinated by but it has been fictional. Now a team of researchers has created a perceptual illusion of having an invisible body. You won't just 'feel' invisible like no one notices you in a crowd, you can actually feel invisible. The history of literature features many well-known narrations of invisibility and its effect on the human mind, such as the myth of Gyges' ring in Plato's dialogue The Republic and the science fiction novel The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells. Recent […]
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2:08 PM | High Mountains May Be Warming Faster
Higher elevations around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to a paper which reviewed elevation-dependent warming mechanisms such as loss of snow and ice, increased latent heat release at high altitudes, low-elevation aerosol pollutants that increase the difference in warming rates between low and high elevations, plus other factors that enhance warming with elevation in different regions, and in different seasons. read more
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2:00 PM | Experimental Drug Could Aid Frontline Spinal Injury Treatment
Rapid treatment with a new anti-inflammatory called C5aR could have a major impact on recovery from spinal cord injury. University of Queensland School of Biomedical Sciences researchers Dr. Marc Ruitenberg and Ph.D. student Faith Brennan said they made the discovery during laboratory trials with an experimental drug. Brennan said that excessive inflammation caused additional damage in spinal cord injuries and hindered recovery. read more
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1:45 PM | It's Hubble's 25th Birthday But We Get A Present
The Hubble Space Telescope is almost old enough to buy its own health insurance! Tomorrow, April 24th, the Hubble Space Telescope will turn 25. For much of that time, it has been a few hundred miles away, providing a peek into the cosmos. It has long exceeded its mission life (good thing too, it's successor will be a decade past its original completion date and 900% over budget, if it even goes up on the latest 2018 date) but that is okay, Hubble shows no signs of letting up.read more
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1:35 PM | Science 2.0: Quantum Theory Makes Big Data Manageable
One cornerstone of the Science 2.0 approach is the framework for making Big Data manageable. In fields from physics to biology, it's no longer a question of obtaining data, but managing it in ways that are relevant. It's been problematic in science just as it has been in business and the public sector because relationships between the different parts of a network have been represented as simple links, regardless of how many ways they can actually interact, and that results in a loss of valuable […]
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1:30 PM | Baseball Social Media Techniques Increase Fan Engagement
Businesses have been expanding their marketing and communication efforts to engage people with their brands through sites such as Facebook and Twitter and they discovered that being open, rather than just engaging in push marketing, helps.read more
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1:24 PM | Chilli Peppers May Prevent Liver Damage And Progression
Daily consumption of capsaicin, the active compound of chilli peppers, was found to have beneficial effects on liver damage. The study found capsaicin reduced the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in mice models. HSCs are the major cell type involved in liver fibrosis, which is the formation of scar tissue in response to liver damage. The mice were split into two groups and received capsaicin in their food: After three days of bile duct ligation (BDL) in which the common bile duct is […]
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