Posts

August 21, 2014

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7:58 PM | From blog to journal
I recently wrote a slightly whinging blog post about the time I spent updating all my online profiles after I had my most recent paper published. To my surprise, that experience got mentioned in a recent news article in Nature. It’s a sidebar that only appears in the online version of the story, not the print version, alas.It’s a good reminder that when you write in public, you never know where your influence stops.Related postsUpdating, updating, and updating some moreExternal […]
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6:35 PM | The first scientist…or natural philosopher
Nature has a review of a book on Aristotle: Aristotle is considered by many to be the first scientist, although the term postdates him by more than two millennia. In Greece in the fourth century BC, he pioneered the techniques … Continue reading →
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5:02 PM | Jonas Salk and the Polio Comeback
Jonas Salk, you should know this name, but chances are you don’t. He was the inventor of the polio vaccine, a disease that was feared more than the atomic bomb. […]

Drexler JF, Grard G, Lukashev AN, Kozlovskaya LI, Böttcher S, Uslu G, Reimerink J, Gmyl AP, Taty-Taty R, Lekana-Douki SE & Nkoghe D (2014). Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25136105

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4:53 PM | From the vault: I•Con 2 logo
I•Con was a fan run science fiction convention in Victoria, British Columbia. There are several SF conventions with that name, but in this case, “I” was supposed to stand for “Island”, as in Vancouver Island.There were two iterations of I•Con, and I was involved in organizing the second one, in October 1991. I was the art show director, helped get Barry Beyerstein invited as a science guest, and did miscellaneous other things, including designing the logo you […]
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3:57 PM | psydoctor8: Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate...
psydoctor8: Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate in my lab!
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2:57 PM | Never underestimate the power of a thorough literature review
As someone who is currently writing their thesis, I have a major piece of advice for PhD students embarking on their studies… Never underestimate the power of a thorough literature review! Always, always, always read as much as you can about the field of research you are working in. Especially if there are numerous inconsistencies […]
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2:09 PM | Assistant Professor in Cognitive Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, R.I. 02912
The Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences (CLPS) invites applications for atenure-track Assistant Professor position in cognitive neuroscience beginning July 1, 2015. Allcandidates utilizing methodological approaches such as neuroimaging to address basic questions in anyarea of cognitive neuroscience will be considered. Exceptional candidates whose research addressestopics relevant to psychiatric disorders are particularly encouraged to apply. This appointment will […]
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1:45 PM | Monthly Transfusions Reduce Silent Strokes In Kids With Sickle Cell Anemia
Silent strokes are a loss of blood flow to parts of the brain. Such strokes do not cause immediate symptoms and typically go undiagnosed, but they cause damage. In kids, they can even lower IQ. read more
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12:30 PM | Researching Magic
David Gorski and I have just published a paper in Trends in Molecular Medicine titled: Clinical trials of integrative medicine: testing whether magic works? While we have published literally thousands of online articles discussing these issues here, at Science-Based Medicine, and other venues, it’s great to get an article in the peer-reviewed literature, which hopefully [...]
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11:00 AM | Cell Phone Morphs Into A Portable Science Lab
(Inside Science TV) – From the classrooms to research facilities a cell phone could morph into a portable science lab."If we could use a cellphone as a microscope that would be a very cheap and cost effective way to solve a number of our problems," said Thomas Larson, a mechanical engineering graduate of the University of Washington in Seattle and inventor of the Micro Phone Lens.The idea came to Larson while he was working in the lab at the University of Washington."We’re using […]
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8:43 AM | Back to the future - Psychologists investigate why some people see the future as being behind them
Speakers of English and many other languages refer to the future as being in front, and the past behind (e.g. "I look forward to seeing you"). This manner of thinking and speaking is so entrenched, we rarely pause to consider why we do it. One influential and intuitive explanation is that humans have an obvious front (the way our heads face), which combined with our tendency to think about time in terms of space, leads us to see ourselves moving forwards into the future, or the future coming […]

de la Fuente J, Santiago J, Román A, Dumitrache C & Casasanto D (2014). When You Think About It, Your Past Is in Front of You: How Culture Shapes Spatial Conceptions of Time., Psychological science, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25052830

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6:14 AM | Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate in my lab!
Answer these 3 questions, and help settle a debate in my lab!
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5:17 AM | How to prevent a possible concussion from the ALS ice bucket challenge
The ice bucket challenge has swept the nation in an effort to raise awareness for ALS. However, there seems to have been a number of concussions (or mild traumatic brain injury) sustained from performing a seemingly altruistic act. Although some people may find the below video funny, concussions are a serious issue and can lead to serious consequences including executive dysfunction.Two recent meta-analyses (one examining neuropsychological performance while the other examining fMRI data) have […]

Eierud C, Craddock RC, Fletcher S, Aulakh M, King-Casas B, Kuehl D & LaConte SM (2014). Neuroimaging after mild traumatic brain injury: Review and meta-analysis., NeuroImage. Clinical, 4 283-94. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061565

Karr JE, Areshenkoff CN & Garcia-Barrera MA (2014). The neuropsychological outcomes of concussion: a systematic review of meta-analyses on the cognitive sequelae of mild traumatic brain injury., Neuropsychology, 28 (3) 321-36. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24219611

Rohling, M., Larrabee, G. & Millis, S. (2012). The “Miserable Minority” Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Who Are They and do Meta-Analyses Hide Them?, The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 26 (2) 197-213. DOI: 10.1080/13854046.2011.647085

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August 20, 2014

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11:30 PM | Does Motivated Counseling For Youths About Alcohol Work?
One form of drug counseling to help young people with drinking problems makes people in a 'we must do something' culture feel better may be of limited benefit, a new systematic review suggests. Each year, around 320,000 people worldwide between the ages of 15 and 29 die as a result of alcohol misuse. Most of those deaths are due to car accidents, murders, suicides or drowning. Motivational interviewing is a counseling technique developed in the 1980s that is sometimes offered to people […]
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10:17 PM | Sharks use ESP
No summary available for this post.
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10:10 PM | Become an SfN official blogger! #sfn14
The annual Neuroscience meeting (SfN) is coming up soon and SfN has announced that they are once again seeking official bloggers: Social media allows for the widespread sharing of scientific information and increased interaction with colleagues. Twitter, Facebook, and personal … Continue reading →
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9:46 PM | Carbon Tetrachloride: Ozone-depleting Compound Persists Decades Later
Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was once used in dry cleaning and as a fire-extinguishing agent but once it was found to be a cause of ozone depleted, it was regulated in 1987 under the Montreal Protocol along with other chlorofluorocarbons. Parties to the Montreal Protocol have reported zero new CCl4 emissions since, though worldwide emissions of CCl4 still average 39 kilotons per year, about 30 percent of emissions prior to the treaty going into effect.read more
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9:32 PM | Cough Syrups With Codeine Linked To Brain Deficits
A brain imaging study that looked at chronic users of codeine-containing cough syrups found deficits in specific regions of brain white matter and associates these changes with increased impulsivity in codeine-containing cough syrup users. read more
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8:00 PM | Communicating Neuroscience: Hype and the Sources of Spin
As part of the Brain Matters! Vancouver Thematic Sessions Video Podcast, we present: Communicating Neuroscience: Hype and the Sources of Spin by Timothy Caulfield, Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy, University of Alberta This video presentation features the … Continue reading →
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7:28 PM | Announcing the NeuroRumblr: Crowd-sourcing information in neuroscience
When it comes to providing information about jobs, Neuroscience is behind the times. Other fields have systems set up to allow faculty applicants to share information with each other about the job market. Economics has econjobrumors while ecology has this awesome … Continue reading →
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6:30 PM | Facial Symmetry And Good Health May Not Be Related
Is beauty in the face of the beheld? Shutterstock By Richard Cook, City University LondonBeauty, it is said, is in the eye of the beholder. And yet, there are many faces that a majority would find beautiful, say, George Clooney’s or Audrey Hepburn’s. read more
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6:19 PM | Jurassic Welsh
For most people, the Jurassic period conjures up images of huge dinosaurs chomping their way through lush vegetation and each other.  But mammals and their immediate ancestors were also around 201 to 145 million years ago, just not as spectacular as we are now.  Early Jurassic mammals were thought to have been confined to the ecological margins, eating whatever insects they could find. However, this was also the time when new mammal characteristics – such as better hearing and […]
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6:05 PM | Do Nutrition Rating Systems Encourage Healthier Spending Habits?
Cornell University marketing researchers recently tracked the purchasing records in a supermarket chain that uses the Guiding Stars System to rate the nutritional value of foods for sale. read more
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5:42 PM | Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones
Scientists are still discovering new information about the function of the amygdala, a region of the brain important for learning about threats The post Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones appeared first on Lab Land.
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5:40 PM | If Seals Hadn't Introduced Tuberculosis To The New World, Europeans Would Have
Among the popular mythologies built up around native American cultures is that they had no disease before Europeans arrived full of pathogens. It's a common narrative in anthropology, it just was never science. A new study documents that again, finding isolated Mycobacterium pinnipedii from skeletons found in Peru which are at least 1000 years old. The pathogen is a relative of the TB bacterium that affects seals, so it likely that seals carried the pathogens from Africa to the Peruvian […]
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5:31 PM | Calling On NCCAM To Stop Endorsing Unscientific, 'Alternative' Medicines
David Gorski of Wayne State University School of Medicine and Steven Novella of Yale University, writing in Trends in Molecular Medicine, call for an end to clinical trials of "highly implausible treatments" such as homeopathy and reiki. Over the last two decades, such complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been embraced in medical academia despite budget constraints and the fact that they rest on dubious beliefs.read more
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4:36 PM | Why working too hard impairs your thinking.
This week’s blog post comes from Rebekah Lambert. Rebekah makes her living as marketing, content creation and copywriting freelancer at Unashamedly Creative and as head of Disruption for Discordia Zine. Rebekah has just begun a mission to improve the mental health and wellness outcomes for freelancers and entrepreneurs as one half of the Hacking Happiness team. You can follow her journey […]The post Why working too hard impairs your thinking. appeared […]
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4:30 PM | The DNA Signature of Lupus
My Uncle suffered from Lupus. The disease itself should have a more sinister sounding name, given the effect it has on the body. Lupus is a form of autoimmune disease […]

Julia I Ellyard, Rebekka Jerjen, Jaime L Martin, Adrian Lee, Matthew A Field, Simon H Jiang, Jean Cappello, Svenja K Naumann, T Daniel Andrews, Hamish S Scott & Marco G Casarotto (2014). Whole exome sequencing in early-onset cerebral SLE identifies a pathogenic variant in TREX1, Arthritis & Rheumatology , Other:

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Editor's Pick
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4:20 PM | Evolution 2014, watch the talks!
I am really behind on this, but there is a spreadsheet with videos of most (?) of the talks from the Evolution 2014 conference. Here are the talks that are relevant to the interests of the blog: Flexible decision-making in a variable … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Crowdsourcing Competitions Often Hijacked: Study
By Charis Palmer, The ConversationCrowdsourcing competitions, popular with companies seeking to tap into groups of knowledge, are often diminished by malicious behaviour, according to a new study.The research, published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, found the opennesss of crowdsourced competitions, particularly those with a “winner takes all” prize, made them vulnerable to attack. read more
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