Posts

March 04, 2015

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1:25 PM | What squirms inside a tiny bird? Odd new tapeworm species
Parasites such as nematodes, tapeworms, flukes, ticks and lice are normal in nature and can even be beneficial for animals, including humans, says Anna Phillips, […] The post What squirms inside a tiny bird? Odd new tapeworm species appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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3:00 AM | Slug Slime Is A Liquid Crystal And It's Actually Pretty Incredible
You do not become a forest-floor-creeping mollusk on good looks alone; to crawl effectively, you need something with which to lubricate your wriggling, slimy, slithering self. Mucus, secreted in abundance from your entire body, is just the ticket. But slug slime is good for a lot more than whole-body lubrication.Read more...

March 03, 2015

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8:00 PM | The yawning enigma
Most animals do it. You’ve been doing it since before you were even born. And it’s quite likely looking at these photos has made you do it now. Yawning. But why do we yawn and why is yawning so contagious?
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1:35 AM | Yes, This Is A Photo Of A Baby Weasel 'Riding' A Woodpecker In Flight
ABSOLUTLEY INCREDIBLE photo by Martin Le-May. Green Woodpecker and Weasel. Apparently the Woodpecker escaped. pic.twitter.com/PUt1b2Mbhs — Jason Ward (@Jayward7) March 2, 2015 Read more...

March 02, 2015

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3:54 PM | An octopus hunts on land, the cutest red pandas and another...
An octopus hunts on land, the cutest red pandas and another SeaWorld fail Controversial Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe puts elephant on his birthday party menu, a beluga whale dies at SeaWorld, Amur leopard numbers are on the rise and feast your eyes on the most adorable red panda video you will ever see! Get these stories and more in this week’s blast of nature news! By: Earth Touch.
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2:38 PM | All Creatures Great and Smart Does your dog really think and...
All Creatures Great and Smart Does your dog really think and feel like a human? Do our closest primate relatives have brains and emotions similar to ours? What about the storied intelligence of dolphins and singing humpback whales? And do other species hold surprises for us if we’re willing to look closely? What can we learn from pin-sized brains that can count, categorize, and hold a grudge against those who’ve tried to swat them? When one examines the current research, some lines […]
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10:23 AM | Gastropoda Bibliography (World-Freshwater) 2015: 1,780 Pages, 22,440 References, Auto-Compiled and augmented by Christophe Avon (MAHN).
Gastropoda Bibliography (World-Freshwater)1,780 Pages, 22,440 ReferencesAuto-compiled and augmented by Christophe Avon (MAHN)«This freshwater mollusk bibliography database is a collaborative effort by Kevin Cummings, Illinois Natural History Survey, Art Bogan, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Tom Watters, The Ohio State University Museum of Biological Diversity, and Christine Mayer, Illinois Natural History Survey. The project was funded […]
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9:35 AM | The Birds and the Trees | @GrrlScientist
Today’s “Museum Monday” video shows how museums are central to the process of shedding new light upon the relationships within the avian Tree of Life.“If you’ve seen one little brown bird, you’ve seen them all.”As any beginning bird watcher can tell you, many bird species tend to look alike, even those that are not at all related. On the other hand, close relatives may look very different. But appearances and behaviour can be deceiving: for example, […]
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1:17 AM | What Bonobos Can Teach Us Bonobos share 98.7% of our DNA....
What Bonobos Can Teach Us Bonobos share 98.7% of our DNA. Physically, they resemble chimpanzees. But something remarkable sets them apart from their primate cousins, making them an altogether different animal. Bonobos live in almost complete absence of violence; work cooperatively toward shared goals; foster a society that values equality; and engage in prolific casual sex. Could these gentle, promiscuous creatures hold the key to a world without war? Vanessa Woods, author of Bonobo Handshake, […]

March 01, 2015

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11:10 PM | Thinking about Thinking Animals may not understand English or...
Thinking about Thinking Animals may not understand English or Chinese, but can they read our body language? Can they get inside our heads? Brian Hare demonstrates tests with dogs that assess their ability to “think about what we’re thinking about.” By: World Science Festival.
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2:42 PM | Parrot Copy Cat by animalwondersmontana: Zoe the red lored...
Parrot Copy Cat by animalwondersmontana: Zoe the red lored Amazon parrot, Amazona autumnalis, is one of our original animal ambassadors. She’s so fun to have around and makes me so happy that I’ve chosen to provide a happy and healthy life for all our amazing animals. Support on Subbable: https://subbable.com/anmlwndrs

February 27, 2015

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7:40 PM | It’s life, Charlie, but not as we know it – Charles Darwin and the search for Extraterrestrial Life
Actor Leonard Nimoy passed away today aged 83. So to remember his famous role as science-officer Spock on board of the USS Enterprise I will share some space-geology-related posts:In August 1881 the short-lived popular “Science” magazine published an article with a letter exchange by two amateur geologists – British Charles R. Darwin and the German Otto Hahn- discussing the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Just some years earlier Darwin had published a book “On […]
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3:43 PM | Ant bites inspire study of nectar organs on tropical trees
Scientific inspiration springs from many sources. In the case of Smithsonian botanist David Kenfack, ant bites were the inspiration for a recent paper he co-authored […] The post Ant bites inspire study of nectar organs on tropical trees appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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3:24 PM | Shelf Life Episode 4 - Skull of the Olinguito Ninety years after...
Shelf Life Episode 4 - Skull of the Olinguito Ninety years after it was first collected, Mammal #66753 from was finally recognized as a new species. Researcher Miguel Pinto tells the story of how a Museum specimen helped lead to the discovery of the olinguito, and Curator Nancy Simmons discusses the importance of holotypes. For more about how new species are discovered in collections—and in the field—head over to the episode website: […]
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2:57 PM | A History of the Use of Illustrations in the Geosciences: I. Seeing is Believing...
The progress made in understanding realistic landscape-views and the rediscovery of ancient encyclopedias (like the works by Pliny the Elder) inspired Renaissance naturalists to adopt an exact and systematic approach to describe the curiosities found in the natural world. As most information as possible should be associated to every studied object – compiled from the works of ancient authors, own observations, may also supposed medical and magical properties, a good description should […]
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1:17 AM | Why Do Whales Beach Themselves? Recently, 200 whales washed up...
Why Do Whales Beach Themselves? Recently, 200 whales washed up on a beach in New Zealand, and many died from dehydration before they were rescued. Why do whales do this to themselves? Read More:Almost 200 whales stranded on New Zealand beachWhy Do Whales Beach Themselves?Why Are Dolphins Beaching Themselves?Smithsonian Scientists Solve “Sudden Death at Sea” Mystery By: DNews.
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12:40 AM | Why The Aardvark May Be The Strangest Creature On Earth
The aardvark looks like a few other animals — the anteater, the armadillo, the pig — but it's closely related to none of them. It may be one of the world's few unique creatures.Read more...
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12:35 AM | Field Notes: Flamingo Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Field...
Field Notes: Flamingo Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Field Notes are a fun and informative peek into the lives of animals. By: Wild Kingdom.

February 26, 2015

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2:00 AM | Rats remember acts of kindness, and then reciprocate.
Rats remember acts of kindness, and then reciprocate. A study published this week in Biology Letters showed rats remember who is nice to them and return the favor later. National Geographic calls it "the first evidence of direct reciprocation in nonhumans." We're not so sure about that last part, but it's an impressive finding, nonetheless.Read more...

February 25, 2015

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1:00 PM | Mirroring Evolution
Biology concepts – bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry, planulozoa hypothesis, cephalization, last animal common ancestor, porifera, platyhelminth, cnidarian, echinodermataHalloween was a classic slasher film. Jamie Lee Curtis looks so young, decades before Freaky Friday or yogurt commercials. Michael Myers could cut a man in half with his machete, but could he produce two mirror image halves?Slasher movies have been around for years. The heyday of the knife-wielding madman was in the […]

Moroz, L., Kocot, K., Citarella, M., Dosung, S., Norekian, T., Povolotskaya, I., Grigorenko, A., Dailey, C., Berezikov, E., Buckley, K. & Ptitsyn, A. (2014). The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems, Nature, 510 (7503) 109-114. DOI: 10.1038/nature13400

Holló, G. & Novák, M. (2012). The manoeuvrability hypothesis to explain the maintenance of bilateral symmetry in animal evolution, Biology Direct, 7 (1) 22. DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-7-22

Wallberg, A., Thollesson, M., Farris, J. & Jondelius, U. (2004). The phylogenetic position of the comb jellies (Ctenophora) and the importance of taxonomic sampling, Cladistics, 20 (6) 558-578. DOI: 10.1111/j.1096-0031.2004.00041.x

Astley HC (2012). Getting around when you're round: quantitative analysis of the locomotion of the blunt-spined brittle star, Ophiocoma echinata., The Journal of experimental biology, 215 (Pt 11) 1923-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22573771

Citation
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1:00 PM | Mirroring Evolution
Biology concepts – bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry, planulozoa hypothesis, cephalization, last animal common ancestor, porifera, platyhelminth, cnidarian, echinodermataHalloween was a classic slasher film. Jamie Lee Curtis looks so young, decades before Freaky Friday or yogurt commercials. Michael Myers could cut a man in half with his machete, but could he produce two mirror image halves?Slasher movies have been around for years. The heyday of the knife-wielding madman was in the […]

Moroz, L., Kocot, K., Citarella, M., Dosung, S., Norekian, T., Povolotskaya, I., Grigorenko, A., Dailey, C., Berezikov, E., Buckley, K. & Ptitsyn, A. (2014). The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems, Nature, 510 (7503) 109-114. DOI: 10.1038/nature13400

Holló, G. & Novák, M. (2012). The manoeuvrability hypothesis to explain the maintenance of bilateral symmetry in animal evolution, Biology Direct, 7 (1) 22. DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-7-22

Wallberg, A., Thollesson, M., Farris, J. & Jondelius, U. (2004). The phylogenetic position of the comb jellies (Ctenophora) and the importance of taxonomic sampling, Cladistics, 20 (6) 558-578. DOI: 10.1111/j.1096-0031.2004.00041.x

Astley HC (2012). Getting around when you're round: quantitative analysis of the locomotion of the blunt-spined brittle star, Ophiocoma echinata., The Journal of experimental biology, 215 (Pt 11) 1923-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22573771

Citation
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1:00 PM | Mirroring Evolution
Biology concepts – bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry, planulozoa hypothesis, cephalization, last animal common ancestor, porifera, platyhelminth, cnidarian, echinodermataHalloween was a classic slasher film. Jamie Lee Curtis looks so young, decades before Freaky Friday or yogurt commercials. Michael Myers could cut a man in half with his machete, but could he produce two mirror image halves?Slasher movies have been around for years. The heyday of the knife-wielding madman was in the […]

Moroz, L., Kocot, K., Citarella, M., Dosung, S., Norekian, T., Povolotskaya, I., Grigorenko, A., Dailey, C., Berezikov, E., Buckley, K. & Ptitsyn, A. (2014). The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems, Nature, 510 (7503) 109-114. DOI: 10.1038/nature13400

Holló, G. & Novák, M. (2012). The manoeuvrability hypothesis to explain the maintenance of bilateral symmetry in animal evolution, Biology Direct, 7 (1) 22. DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-7-22

Wallberg, A., Thollesson, M., Farris, J. & Jondelius, U. (2004). The phylogenetic position of the comb jellies (Ctenophora) and the importance of taxonomic sampling, Cladistics, 20 (6) 558-578. DOI: 10.1111/j.1096-0031.2004.00041.x

Astley HC (2012). Getting around when you're round: quantitative analysis of the locomotion of the blunt-spined brittle star, Ophiocoma echinata., The Journal of experimental biology, 215 (Pt 11) 1923-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22573771

Citation

February 24, 2015

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9:46 PM | Amazing Bird Migrations - A Week in Science This week join some...
Amazing Bird Migrations - A Week in Science This week join some of the world’s most frequent flyers as we examine amazing bird migrations. For more information visit: http://riaus.org.au/podcast/a-week-in-science-20-february-2015/ By: RiAus TV.
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8:00 PM | The power of hunger
You’re probably aware that going to the supermarket when you’re hungry is a bad idea. Research published back in 1969 showed that people tend to buy more food if they hadn’t eaten recently and were hungry. But that’s not the only way hunger affects the choices we make.
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8:11 AM | Shelf Life: the Olinguito’s Skull
SUMMARY: Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer. Today’s video is from the American Museum of Natural History. It is the fourth episode in their year-long Shelf Life video series. Shelf Life is a bite-sized video exploration of some of the many natural treasures housed at the AMNH, how these specimens came to be there, the stories they... Read more
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8:11 AM | Shelf Life: the Olinguito’s Skull
SUMMARY: Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer. Today’s video is from the American Museum of Natural History. It is the fourth episode in their year-long Shelf Life video series. Shelf Life is a bite-sized video exploration of some of the many natural treasures housed at the AMNH, how these specimens came to be there, the stories they... Read more
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8:11 AM | Shelf Life: the Olinguito’s Skull
SUMMARY: Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer. Today’s video is from the American Museum of Natural History. It is the fourth episode in their year-long Shelf Life video series. Shelf Life is a bite-sized video exploration of some of the many natural treasures housed at the AMNH, how these specimens came to be there, the stories they... Read more
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7:38 AM | Octopus gets crabby in Yallingup | @GrrlScientist
This is the first time that this remarkable octopus behaviour has ever been captured on video.Octopus are amazing creatures in many ways, but this remarkable video, recently captured by Porsche Indrisie in Yallingup, Western Australia, serendipitously captures a tide pool octopus doing something I never knew they could do: hunting on land: Continue reading...

February 23, 2015

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8:10 PM | Gorgeous Banknotes Feature Flora, Fauna—And Skeletons Under UV Light
For her Master's project, graphic designer Barbara Bernát created a fictional currency she calls the Hungarian Euro. Instead of people or monuments, the obverse and reverse of Bernat's notes feature beautiful illustrations of European animals and plants; beneath UV light, the skeletal anatomies of the former become visible.Read more...
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2:10 PM | Shelf Life: the Olinguito's Skull | @GrrlScientist
Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer.I’m rescheduling videos that feature natural history museums and the like from the weekend to Mondays (“Museum Monday”) so a larger audience can learn more about the many varied roles that these institutions perform to benefit scientific research and public knowledge. Today’s video is from the […]
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