Posts

December 21, 2014

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2:07 PM | G'boro Parks & Rec Offers Zoologic Op
Greensboro offers waterfowl boat tours on lake http://t.co/YS8aXtMhDA— Greensboro Taste (@GreensboroTaste) December 21, 2014 "Greensboro Parks and Recreation is offering pontoon boat rides to watch for migrating and wintering waterfowl on Lake Townsend." Lake Townsend is a great place to spot birds and wildlife within Greensboro's limits.
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1:56 PM | Shelf Life: Turtles and taxonomy | @GrrlScientist
For most people, individual plants or animals can be very beautiful, but for scientists, the real wonder lies in understanding the interrelationships between species and how they fit into the tapestry of life.It might surprise you to learn that every week, scientists are discovering new plant and animal species -- even species that are big enough to be seen with the naked eye. With each now discovery comes the same question: how is this new species related to all the others that we already know […]

December 20, 2014

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9:54 PM | Ants: Super Soldiers Take a microscopic look at an army of tiny...
Ants: Super Soldiers Take a microscopic look at an army of tiny but ruthless creatures: ants. Chemical warfare and aggressive military-style strategies help them accomplish their one mission in life: ensure the survival of the colony at all costs. By: Earth Touch.

December 19, 2014

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7:27 PM | Deep Sea Fish Farming in Geodesic Domes: Upgrade In this...
Deep Sea Fish Farming in Geodesic Domes: Upgrade In this episode of Upgrade, Motherboard goes to Baja California, Mexico to get a firsthand look at these free floating pods, and to get an understanding for why we need better ways to cultivate our future food sources. Whether it’s found on a plate of sushi, grilled in our backyard, or thrown on pasta, seafood is a staple for many diets around the world, and demand is growing. And as the commercial seafood industry booms, fish stocks […]

December 18, 2014

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9:55 PM | 13 Amazing Slow Motion Animals Some of the BBC’s best...
13 Amazing Slow Motion Animals Some of the BBC’s best slow motion animal shots. Which is your favourite? By: Earth Unplugged.
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7:27 PM | Cheetahs use film vehicle as look-out post The Earth Touch crew...
Cheetahs use film vehicle as look-out post The Earth Touch crew filming in the Serengetti got much more than they bargained for when some cheetahs decided to use the roof of the vehicle as a lookout post. This is an unforgettable close encounter of the big cat kind on this latest episode of Crazy Cameramen. By: Earth Touch.

December 17, 2014

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10:44 PM | The Brain Scoop: The Fer-de-Lance by thebrainscoop: I love...
The Brain Scoop: The Fer-de-Lance by thebrainscoop: I love snakes. I love their physiology and anatomy, their behavior, their beauty, their deep integration into human mythology, culture, and folklore. You can guarantee if there’s a reptile hall at a museum or zoo, I make a beeline for the snakes. So, when it came to meeting Pablo Venegas - a man who I previously had only known from a larger-than-life photo in our Restoring Earth exhibit holding a massive bushmaster by its tail - […]
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12:11 PM | Humpback Whales Sing Tick-Tock Songs For Supper
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are known to employ group foraging techniques, however details on how individuals coordinate with each other still remain a mystery. A new study by Susan Parks, assistant professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers examined the importance of specific auditory cues that these whales emit

Parks SE, Cusano DA, Stimpert AK, Weinrich MT, Friedlaender AS & Wiley DN (2014). Evidence for acoustic communication among bottom foraging humpback whales., Scientific reports, 4 7508. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25512188

Citation
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12:11 PM | Humpback Whales Sing Tick-Tock Songs For Supper
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are known to employ group foraging techniques, however details on how individuals coordinate with each other still remain a mystery. A new study by Susan Parks, assistant professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers examined the importance of specific auditory cues that these whales emit

Parks SE, Cusano DA, Stimpert AK, Weinrich MT, Friedlaender AS & Wiley DN (2014). Evidence for acoustic communication among bottom foraging humpback whales., Scientific reports, 4 7508. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25512188

Citation

December 15, 2014

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8:16 PM | Why Sea Stars Are Literally Tearing Themselves Apart Sea Stars...
Why Sea Stars Are Literally Tearing Themselves Apart Sea Stars (or starfish) or literally tearing themselves apart, with their limbs detaching from their bodies in horrifying ways. It’s called Sea Star Wasting Disease and its decimating populations, and could affect other biomes and groups of sea stars. Can we actually stop this? Kim Horcher, Marisha Ray (Persona Q, Pen & Paper & Lazer Guns), and Bryan Forrest (Video Game High School, Man at Arms) discuss! Read more: […]
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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12:00 PM | The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog
Pseudis paradoxa in a pond Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Amphibia Order: Anura Family: Hylidae Genus: Pseudis Species: Pseudis paradoxa Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened) Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down

EMERSON, S. (1988). The giant tadpole of Pseudis paradoxa, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 34 (2) 93-104. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.1988.tb01951.x

Abdel-Wahab YH, Power GJ, Ng MT, Flatt PR & Conlon JM (2008). Insulin-releasing properties of the frog skin peptide pseudin-2 and its [Lys18]-substituted analogue., Biological chemistry, 389 (2) 143-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163889

Arias, M., Peltzer, P. & Lajmanovich, R. (2002). Diet of the giant tadpole Pseudis paradoxa platensis (Anura, Pseudidae) from Argentina, Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 1 (2) 97. DOI: 10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v1i2p97-100

Citation
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1:11 AM | GoPro Lion - Lion Steals & Chews GoPro - Animal Action...
GoPro Lion - Lion Steals & Chews GoPro - Animal Action Cam In this episode of Animal Action Cam we go for a walk on the wild side with Africa’s apex predator. A lioness makes off with a GoPro and we’re treated to a journey into the heart of the pride. This GoPro lion picks up the mini camera and carries it in her mouth similar to a chew toy. By: Earth Touch.
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12:22 AM | How do mosquitoes hunt you? Ever wondered what’s going on...
How do mosquitoes hunt you? Ever wondered what’s going on when you feel that stinging bite of a mosquito? Take a closer look as we magnify them by epic proportions. To learn how Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) work click here: http://science.howstuffworks.com/scan By: Earth Unplugged.

December 14, 2014

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10:44 PM | How Dogs Really Listen to Us, and How Pufferfish Puff This week...
How Dogs Really Listen to Us, and How Pufferfish Puff This week on SciShow News: Animals! New research has found how dogs actually listen to us in more complex ways than you probably thought, and also figured out how a kind of pufferfish gets its puff up. By: SciShow. Support on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow
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9:05 PM | Ravens Bully in a Way Only Before Seen in Humans Ravens have...
Ravens Bully in a Way Only Before Seen in Humans Ravens have shown social abilities that haven’t even been apparent in primates besides humans! According to a recent study from Researched form the University of Vienna recently published a study on how the birds interact…and a lot of it is actually bullying! How do they maintain their social structure, and how can other birds challenge it? Kim Horcher discusses with science educator and actress, Christina Ochoa! (Know Brainer […]
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2:43 PM | Bare bones, rare bones: London's stegosaur | @GrrlScientist
A most excellent Christmas gift for Londoners, courtesy of the Natural History Museum.As the Christmas holidays stampede relentlessly down upon us, the Natural History Museum has given Londoners the best holiday gift that anyone could possibly wish for: a Stegosaur! Dubbed “Sophie” after the daughter of the wealthy hedge fund manager whose donation made this acquisition possible, she is now on public display for you to enjoy.Stegosaurus are mini-bus sized herbivorous dinosaurs that […]
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12:00 AM | Introducing Amy Wild, adventurer
I’d like to introduce Amy Wild to Fireside Science and Bedtime Science. Amy will bring us some exciting adventures from the Australian bush. Amy was born in December, 1989. From a toddler, she was exposed to the wilderness; learning to climb trees, snorkel, pitch a tent and catch a lizard before entering primary school. The […]

December 13, 2014

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11:33 PM | Ten Steps of Tortoise Taxidermy with Lonesome George Go behind...
Ten Steps of Tortoise Taxidermy with Lonesome George Go behind the scenes to learn about the process of preserving Lonesome George, the iconic Pinta Island tortoise from the Galapagos who was the last of his species. Lonesome George is on view at the Museum through January 4, 2015. Preserving Lonesome Georgehttp://youtu.be/AZKbO2B7po0 Museum Helps Preserve Iconic Tortoise Lonesome Georgehttp://youtu.be/xLAuG_ms7QE Lonesome George and the Galapagos Today: What the Tortoise Taught […]

December 12, 2014

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7:58 AM | Researchers Discover Well-Endowed Bone Eating Worm
Male Osedax priapusThe entire body of males has evolved as a tool for mating Osedax is a genus of weird, deep-sea polychaetes worms, commonly known as boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms. The story of these creatures began twelve years ago, when researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) first discovered them, using the submarine ROV Tiburon in Monterey

Rouse, G., Wilson, N., Worsaae, K. & Vrijenhoek, R. (2014). A Dwarf Male Reversal in Bone-Eating Worms, Current Biology, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.11.032

Rouse GW, Worsaae K, Johnson SB, Jones WJ & Vrijenhoek RC (2008). Acquisition of dwarf male "harems" by recently settled females of Osedax roseus n. sp. (Siboglinidae; Annelida)., The Biological bulletin, 214 (1) 67-82. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258777

Vrijenhoek RC, Johnson SB & Rouse GW (2008). Bone-eating Osedax females and their 'harems' of dwarf males are recruited from a common larval pool., Molecular ecology, 17 (20) 4535-44. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18986498

Citation
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7:58 AM | Researchers Discover Well-Endowed Bone Eating Worm
Male Osedax priapusThe entire body of males has evolved as a tool for mating Osedax is a genus of weird, deep-sea polychaetes worms, commonly known as boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms. The story of these creatures began twelve years ago, when researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) first discovered them, using the submarine ROV Tiburon in Monterey

Rouse, G., Wilson, N., Worsaae, K. & Vrijenhoek, R. (2014). A Dwarf Male Reversal in Bone-Eating Worms, Current Biology, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.11.032

Rouse GW, Worsaae K, Johnson SB, Jones WJ & Vrijenhoek RC (2008). Acquisition of dwarf male "harems" by recently settled females of Osedax roseus n. sp. (Siboglinidae; Annelida)., The Biological bulletin, 214 (1) 67-82. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258777

Vrijenhoek RC, Johnson SB & Rouse GW (2008). Bone-eating Osedax females and their 'harems' of dwarf males are recruited from a common larval pool., Molecular ecology, 17 (20) 4535-44. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18986498

Citation
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7:58 AM | Researchers Discover Well-Endowed Bone Eating Worm
Male Osedax priapusThe entire body of males has evolved as a tool for mating Osedax is a genus of weird, deep-sea polychaetes worms, commonly known as boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms. The story of these creatures began twelve years ago, when researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) first discovered them, using the submarine ROV Tiburon in Monterey

Rouse, G., Wilson, N., Worsaae, K. & Vrijenhoek, R. (2014). A Dwarf Male Reversal in Bone-Eating Worms, Current Biology, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.11.032

Rouse GW, Worsaae K, Johnson SB, Jones WJ & Vrijenhoek RC (2008). Acquisition of dwarf male "harems" by recently settled females of Osedax roseus n. sp. (Siboglinidae; Annelida)., The Biological bulletin, 214 (1) 67-82. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258777

Vrijenhoek RC, Johnson SB & Rouse GW (2008). Bone-eating Osedax females and their 'harems' of dwarf males are recruited from a common larval pool., Molecular ecology, 17 (20) 4535-44. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18986498

Citation
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7:58 AM | Researchers Discover Well-Endowed Bone Eating Worm
Male Osedax priapusThe entire body of males has evolved as a tool for mating Osedax is a genus of weird, deep-sea polychaetes worms, commonly known as boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms. The story of these creatures began twelve years ago, when researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) first discovered them, using the submarine ROV Tiburon in Monterey

Rouse, G., Wilson, N., Worsaae, K. & Vrijenhoek, R. (2014). A Dwarf Male Reversal in Bone-Eating Worms, Current Biology, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.11.032

Rouse GW, Worsaae K, Johnson SB, Jones WJ & Vrijenhoek RC (2008). Acquisition of dwarf male "harems" by recently settled females of Osedax roseus n. sp. (Siboglinidae; Annelida)., The Biological bulletin, 214 (1) 67-82. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258777

Vrijenhoek RC, Johnson SB & Rouse GW (2008). Bone-eating Osedax females and their 'harems' of dwarf males are recruited from a common larval pool., Molecular ecology, 17 (20) 4535-44. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18986498

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