Posts

October 01, 2014

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2:29 PM | Memory Loss From Alzheimer’s Reversed For First Time With New Approach
Nine out of ten patients with memory problems showed improvements with this novel multi-systems approach. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:This Blood Type Linked to Memory Loss Later in Life The Facial Expression That Fights Memory Loss The Surprising Impact of Weight Loss on the Emotions Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Breakthrough How Long-Term Stress Affects […]
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1:28 PM | How Dream Coordinators at Schools Help Students Reach Goals
Investing in just one staff person to help students identify their aspirations and pave the way for them to reach those goals can have a big effect on a high school. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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1:01 PM | Can Lizards Adapt to a Warming World? An Experimental Study Demonstrates Natural Selection for Performance at Warmer Temperatures
In these times of rapidly changing climates, a major question is whether species will be able to survive. Essentially, they have two options: either shift their geographic ranges to stay within their ancestral niches, or adapt to new circumstances. Or, of course, go extinct. In recent years, evolutionary biologists have come to realize that evolutionary […]
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12:49 PM | Director’s Update: Changes to the Wellcome Trust’s structure and leadership
Since he joined us this time last year, Jeremy Farrar, Director of the Wellcome Trust, has been listening – to staff, to researchers, to members of the Wellcome community, and more. In this post he explains some changes to our organisational structure and leadership team… A year ago today, I became Director of the Wellcome […]
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11:33 AM | Science haiku to communicate research and more
NOAA is doing it. Even the entire IPCC Report was boiled down to 19 illustrated haiku. Can science-themed haiku be used for education & outreach, or just for fun?
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11:00 AM | An Expanding Menu for Locavores: Tilapia on Hudson
An innovative business brings new meaning to the idea of local food by raising tilapia, salmon and year-round greens in the Hudson Valley.
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9:13 AM | Geophysical Surveys on Glaciers
Yesterday, I took a group of enthusiastic third year geologists and environmental scientists to the British Geological Survey in Keyworth for a tour of the facilities and discussion/demonstration of their geophysical […]
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9:00 AM | Readable, Accurate and Engaging: an Interview with Terry Devitt
Off the top of my head, I can list dozens of websites that offer readers science news. But in 1996, there were very few websites devoted exclusively to sharing high-quality science writing. One of the first sites to step into that niche was The Why Files, and it’s still cranking out stories almost two decades later. One of the founders of The Why Files is Terry Devitt, who is also the director of research communications at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.... Read more
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6:50 AM | Following the Water: Edward Burtynsky’s Watermark
Water is the stuff of life on Earth. And perhaps beyond—when venturing to search for life beyond our planet, NASA has sought to ‘follow the water’. Indeed, researchers recently discovered the presence of bacteria in a lake sealed hundreds of … Continue reading »The post Following the Water: Edward Burtynsky’s Watermark appeared first on At the Interface.
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6:38 AM | Ebola in USA no reason for panic
In a press conference earlier today, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced that the US has diagnosed its first case of Ebola, in a man who travelled from Liberia to Dallas, Texas, on the 20th of September. The man was asymptomatic while in transit and only developed symptoms around the 24th of September. He [...]
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6:09 AM | A Poor Description of the Monty Hall Problem
My latest book project has been coediting the proceedings of the 2013 MOVES Conference held in New York City, which has turned out to be a lot harder than I anticipated. For the last few weeks it’s been all-consuming, and spending so many hours in front of the computer staring at other people’s writing has…
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3:22 AM | I hope Judith Curry apologizes for this.
I’m not going to talk about Mark Steyn, other than to say that if you know who Rush Limbaugh is, Mark Steyn is a bit to the right and a tad more obnoxious, but not as smart. You can find out more by clicking here, using the Climate Change Science Search Engine. I’m also not…
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3:22 AM | Why are men such dicks? (2014)
‘This macho advantage of speed, strength and fierceness can be exaggerated by females’ tastes. As half of a female’s fate is tied up in her sons, she may have evolved to prefer males who are stronger, faster and who have a greater appetite for risk, since they will be more likely to father sons with […]
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1:55 AM | Time management…
I have grown to appreciate the ability of some people to manage their schedule. As should be obvious from my new posts to this blog in recent months, I have been transitioning into a new phase of life that has presented some significant challenges in managing my time. In my previous existence, I had little […]
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12:27 AM | How weird is it that three pairs of same-market teams made the playoffs this year?
The Major League Baseball postseason is starting just as I write this. From the National League, we have Washington, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. From the American League, we have Baltimore, Kansas City, Detroit, Los Angeles (Anaheim), and Oakland. These match up pretty well geographically, and this hasn’t gone unnoticed: see for […]

September 30, 2014

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9:34 PM | Who’d have thunk it? Embargo broken on announcement of first U.S. case of Ebola
People have been asking me whether I can explain why the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) has had so many embargo breaks this year (8, for those of you keeping score at home). Although I suspect that it has to do with the fact that PNAS has been publishing a lot of […]
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9:19 PM | Nothing quite like the feeling of completing your presentation: Day 2 of the International Palaeontological Congress
MENDOZA, ARGENTINA–I promise, the images will be much more interesting in the next post! Today we concentrated on talks. I finally was able to deliver mine in the same session as Leif Tapanila above. It was a crowded little room, but the presentations kept us well entertained and informed. I learned a lesson: without any […]
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8:16 PM | #Hackebola The truth about contact tracing
Contact tracing is a classic public health intervention. It's no easy task even during small outbreaks - people who had physical contact with someone with an infectious disease are called or visited every day by a public health worker. If they develop symptoms, they are isolated to prevent them from spreading the disease further. When a single case of MERS-CoV was imported into the United States, over 500 people were under followup.With an outbreak as large as Ebola, the number of contacts […]
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8:05 PM | Sauropods: Feats of Engineering
Beginning October 11th, 2014 the NC Museum of Natural Sciences will be opening its special exhibition doors for our new traveling exhibit, The World’s Largest Dinosaurs. The exhibition explores how scientists study fossils and living animals to understand sauropod biology, and what we can learn from these extinct animals about what it means to be […]
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5:40 PM | Scientists use fiber-optic cables to measure ice loss in Antarctic
Fiber-optic cables like the ones that bring television and Internet into millions of homes are now being used to measure how fast ice shelves in Antarctica are melting, according to new research. Researchers installed moorings containing fiber-optic cables hundreds of meters down into the McMurdo Ice Shelf in West Antarctica to collect temperature information about the base of the ice shelf, where the thick platform of floating ice meets the ocean. The sensors were able to measure mere […]
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4:23 PM | What is so rare as a day in… September?
With apologies to James Russell Lowell, it is the fall months that make my heart sing the most, although I’m not sure why. Perhaps because I know what’s coming? I’m playing hookey today, soaking up knowledge from one of the UK’s top sheepdog trainer/handlers, Gordon Watt, who also judged the Nippersink Trial last Friday-Sunday. Thanks […]
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4:03 PM | Up close and personal with a volcanic eruption
Thorbjorg Agustsdottir, a Ph.D. student studying seismology at the University of Cambridge, had the rare opportunity to witness a volcanic eruption up close when Iceland’s Bardarbunda volcano erupted while she and fellow researchers were servicing seismometer stations around the volcano.
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3:59 PM | IUDs and implants have checkered pasts but a pretty awesome present
This week, US pediatricians (in agreement with a previous report from US gynecologists) announced a set of recommendations on contraceptives for young women. The headline grabber: IUDs and implants should be first-line choices. After all, they’re safe, effective, and as … Continue reading »The post IUDs and implants have checkered pasts but a pretty awesome present appeared first on Public Health.
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2:52 PM | Community Genomes: From the Peoples Parrot, to “Crowdfernding”.
Despite the precipitous drop in the price of DNA sequencing, global credit crunches have shrunk the science budgets able to properly take advantage of this. At least in the case of non-medical research. With acceptance rates for some of the major funding agencies in the US declining into single digit percentages, the research community needs to look to new ways of supporting the important work they do. One potential development to redress the balance is for scientists to cut out the middleman, […]
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2:07 PM | How to Feel Good About Your Body and Worry Less About Imperfections
Develop a more positive body image with this psychological approach to the self. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Surprising Motivational Power of Self-Compassion The Body Map of Emotions: Happiness Activates the Whole Body “I Am a Lovable Person!”: Why Positive Mantras Backfire For Some Powerful People Feel Taller Than They Really Are Why […]
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1:49 PM | Metric Are… Everywhere
I’m taking a class on academic writing this semester.  It’s been quite the experience.  For the most part, the class is populated with social science majors.  Attending class each week is like taking a dip in a refreshing cold stream after the clinical dryness of my usual physics and engineering activities.  For class, we’re required [...]
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12:14 PM | Reading Diary: No place to hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. surveillance state by Glenn Greenwald
This is one scary book. Never mind The Exorcist or Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s The Strain trilogy, this is the real thing. And that’s because unlike those authors’ fevered dreams of gods and devils and vampires and plagues, the nightmare that all of our governments are spying on is really real. And we…
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12:00 PM | Invasive species, immigrant emotions and a guilty conscience
I have a confession to make: I live in Sweden and I have lupines in my garden. I didn’t plant them, they were there when I moved in, but after two seasons I haven’t removed them either. In Sweden, I see escaped lupines along roadsides and although I’m not sure how much of a problem…
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7:24 AM | The Devil In The Climate Change Details
  Greenland is melting, the oceans are warming, the sea is rising (and becoming more acidic), and the Arctic sea ice is in a serious decline (that seems to be faster than predicted). These are all things that those who work in climate science understand and accept. They also accept that they are almost certainly being caused by rising greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. Yes, large portions of the public may not …
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4:16 AM | Little Red
As always, my Microbiology class is reading Paul Offit’s Vaccinated this year. Recently, we have started into the chapters concerning Hilleman’s involvement in making vaccines against Measles, Mumps, and Rubella, each taking a chapter in the book.  Rubella is often overlooked as an unimportant disease with milder symptoms than other vaccine-preventable illnesses such as Measles, […]
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