X

Posts

April 22, 2014

+
9:20 PM | Brain Stimulator Offers Hope for Individuals With Uncontrolled Epilepsy
A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures […]
+
6:41 PM | Mantis Shrimp Stronger than Airplanes
Inspired by mantis shrimp, researchers design composite material stronger than […]
+
2:50 PM | Speed-Reading Apps Impair Reading Comprehension
Are you on the go a lot? Is your time so limited even moving your eyeballs is putting you behind? If so, there is an app for that. If not, app developers are looking to create a market for that kind of personalized optimization, so they have devised speed-reading software that eliminates the time we supposedly waste by moving our eyes as we read. Are eyes just passive conduits getting in the way of the modern world with their ancient biological mechanism?  A paper in Psychological […]
+
1:24 PM | Full Frontal Nerdity
I was once caught staring at energy efficiency guru Amory Lovins’ pocket protector, and without blinking he said, “Yes, it’s full frontal nerdity.” There was something refreshing about that... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
12:25 PM | Video: How scientists test marijuana for potency and safety
Marijuana is in the headlines as more and more states […]
+
12:15 PM | Old tires become material for new and improved roads
Americans generate nearly 300 million scrap tires every year, according […]
+
12:00 PM | Potentially Habitable Earth-Size Planet Discovered
Just last week, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced the discovery of the first Earth-sized planet we’ve found that may be habitable. Specifically, the planet is called Kepler-186f and it’s thought to be potentially habitable because it’s within the “habitable zone” of its solar system, or just the right distance from the star … Continue reading »
+
11:46 AM | First brain images of African infants aids research into cognitive effects of nutrition
Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored […]
+
8:00 AM | How losing my smart phone made me smarter
A few weekends ago, I hiked a deep canyon with a couple of friends. As has become my habit, I toted my smart phone along. I set it to mute so that I’d remain undisturbed by pings and rings, and I pulled it out of my pack only to take a few photos. After the […]
+
8:00 AM | How losing my smart phone made me smarter
A few weekends ago, I hiked a deep canyon with a couple of friends. As has become my habit, I toted my smart phone along. I set it to mute so that I’d remain undisturbed by pings and rings, and I pulled it out of my pack only to take a few photos. After the […]

April 21, 2014

+
2:03 PM | Better Donor Transport - Organ Care System FDA Pivotal Trial
At the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) 34th Annual Meeting in San Diego, TransMedics announced results of the PROCEED II heart transplant Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pivotal trial results using the Organ Care System (OCS™) platform.PROCEED II Trial is a large international, multi-center, clinical trial designed to evaluate the ability of the OCS Heart Technology to preserve donor hearts compared with cold storage.read more
+
1:18 PM | Shaving nanoseconds from racing processors
The computer is one of the most complex machines ever […]
+
1:00 PM | ReferralPlus Increases Match Rate For Clinical Trial Volunteers By Over 66%
ReferralPlus is a tool to match patients who disqualify for one study with others they might qualify for, using a geo-therapeutic matching algorithm with other studies, similar to how OpenTable matches people with the restaurants they are interested in by using demographic and time availability algorithms. It was created because 95% of patients who respond to a trial recruitment advertisement do not qualify and/or enroll in that study. Most of those patients never enroll in another […]
+
11:30 AM | EyeBox CNS - National Space Biomedical Research Institute Funds Eye Tracking Technology
The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), based at Baylor College of Medicine, is a consortium of biomedical institutions that study the health risks related to long-duration spaceflight and developing the technologies and countermeasures needed for human space exploration missions.The EyeBoxCNS, a diagnostic device developed to assess brain health through tracking eye movement, and eFormulations, software enabled therapeutics which combine prescription medicines with customized […]

April 20, 2014

+
11:09 PM | NASA Discovers Most Earth-Like Planet Yet
NASA’s half a billion dollar Kepler telescope mission launched in March of 2009, with the primary goal being to answer the question: “What fraction of the stars you see in the night sky have planets that are not only Earth-sized, but also lukewarm in temperature, allowing water to exist in liquid form?” (liquid water is one of the biological prerequisites […]
+
6:40 PM | Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and...
Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”. Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran […]
+
5:39 PM | Bezos’ Law
The future of cloud computing is the availability of more computing power at a much lower cost; Moore’s law thus gives way to Bezos’ law: Over the history of cloud, a unit of computing power price is reduced by 50% approximately every three years.   The cost of cloud computing should naturally track Moore’s law […]
+
2:00 PM | MI weekly selection #71
Slow shaking under Tokyo could mean a giant earthquake. Slow-motion earthquakes beneath Tokyo are becoming more common, raising concerns of another megaquake like the […] Read more The post MI weekly selection #71 appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Life and deeds of RNA (I): William Wallace and the fate of the cell Nanohazards How to tear the cell membrane and do not kill it trying: a door to a new in vivo biochemistry.

April 19, 2014

+
8:25 PM | Brains Anti-Distraction System Found
So once my Grandmother… oh wait sorry, I was distracted while typing. As it turns out I’m not the only one. But there is hope, two Psychologists at Simon Fraser University […]

Gaspar J.M. & McDonald J.J. (2014). Suppression of Salient Objects Prevents Distraction in Visual Search, Journal of Neuroscience, 34 (16) 5658-5666. DOI:

Citation
+
7:15 PM | The Pathological Potential of the Prep Pad
New York Times health columnist Catherine Saint Louis recently covered the many upsides of a spanking new food analyzing device called the Prep Pad. In addition to weighing just how much food you’re about to consume, this unassuming 9-inch-by-6.25 gadget syncs easily with an iPad (generation 3 or higher) to tabulate the grams of carbohydrates, […]
+
6:33 PM | Copy vs Dropbox
Copy is a new cloud storage service that may be a serious competitor to Drobbox. I just installed it and I like it. Dropbox gives 2 Gigabytes for free, 100 Gigabytes for 9.99 a month, 200 Gigabytes for 19.99 a month, and 500 Gigabytes for 49.99 a month. Copy gives 15 Gigabytes for free, 250…
+
3:28 PM | Move Over Dubai! Saudi Arabia’s Kingdom Tower Will Dwarf the Burj Khalifa By Over 500 Feet
Next week, Saudi Arabia will begin work on a new skyscraper in the city of Jeddah. When completed, the Kingdom Tower will be the world’s tallest building by far at 3,280 feet (that’s a full kilometer, by the way).The Burj Khalifa is the current record-holder at 2,716 feet (827m). Kingdom Tower will have 200 floors […]
+
1:52 PM | Wonks create thinnest feasible membrane
Researchers have produced a stable porous membrane that is thinner […]
+
5:01 AM | It's Algorithmic Indulgence for the Masses (or the niche market)
Introducing the latest addition to the Synthetic Daisies blog: Popular Algorithmics. Popular Algorithmics (a takeoff on Popular Mechanics) is a collection of posts originally presented as a series on Tumbld Thoughts. Each entry is a take-off on an established algorithmic approach from the scientific literature. Of particular interest are lesser known algorithmic approaches from the standpoint of both theory and application.

April 18, 2014

+
10:05 PM | Meet Barbara Cartland, the record breaking sex and romance novelist who invented the long distance...
Meet Barbara Cartland, the record breaking sex and romance novelist who invented the long distance aeroplane towed glider. Her concept revolutionised the aero industry and was implemented by armies on all sides of WWII. Aerotow gliders had been used in Germany but only to travel short distances and perform tricks – that wasn’t good enough for Barbara. She worked with two RAF soldiers to build her own long distance glider craft and flew it over 200 miles delivering a sack of […]
+
9:36 PM | danah boyd, Randall Munro, and netizens.
danah boyd, author of 'It's Complicated' just gave a tech talk at Google. Her book has been in the news a lot lately, so I'll skip the details (although Facebook ought to be at least slightly worried).But what I enjoyed the most about her talk was the feeling that I was listening to a true netizen: someone who lives and breathes on the internet, understands (and has helped build) modern technology extremely well (she is a computer scientist as well as an ethnographer), and is able to deliver a […]
+
4:02 PM | Artificial Intelligence Programs Go Head To Head
Most academics don't like competition but in the field of artificial intelligence, everyone wants to square off against the best in their discipline.In June, the International Planning Competition held every two years will take place in  New Hampshire. It  is divided into four categories, the most significant of which is considered the “deterministic track”. This is for programs designed to eliminate any element of chance from automated planning in a wide range of […]
+
2:04 PM | Next big idea in forest conservation? Maps for the masses
Mark Mulligan makes maps for the masses. In his work on tropical forests, Mulligan uses GIS, modeling, remote sensing, and lab experiments to turn research into datasets and policy support systems, which are available online for use in development, decision-making, and education.
+
1:47 PM | ‘Dressed’ laser aimed at clouds may be key to inducing rain, lightning
The adage “Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does […]
+
11:30 AM | The biotech industry with Rob Carlson
In this interview, I speak to Dr. Rob Carlson, a Principal at Biodesic, an engineering and strategic consulting firm in Seattle that provides services to governments and corporations around the globe. At the broadest level, Dr. Carlson is interested in the future role of biology as a human technology. He is the author of the book Biology is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life, published in 2010 by Harvard University Press; it received the […]
123456789
308 Results