Posts

July 21, 2014

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11:42 PM | Most Wearable Technology Has Been a Commercial Failure, Says Historian
Given the hype around wearable technology like Google Glass, you might be surprised to learn that the wristwatch is still the most successful example of modern wearable tech. Over the past century, wearables have mostly been commercial failures. A new book from MIT Press explores this forgotten history.Read more...
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11:40 PM | ​New Poll Reveals The U.S. Is Number One In Climate Change Denial
The British survey company Ipsos Mori has released its first ever Global Trends Survey, summarizing views from 20 countries on issues ranging from privacy and technology to health and the environment. On the subject of climate change, U.S. citizens revealed themselves to be more divided than any other nation.Read more...
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10:31 PM | Behold: The Beauty of Solar Magnetism NEW VIDEO! As massive...
Behold: The Beauty of Solar Magnetism NEW VIDEO! As massive magnetic fusion reactors go, the sun is pretty awesome. This week’s video features all the violence and beauty that erupt from that big bright thing at the center of our solar system. We’ve got sunspots, coronal loops, solar flares, coronal mass ejections! Even an aurora or two! And thanks to the fine people of NASA and their fancy satellites, this one is dripping with #spaceporn. Watch below: (via pbsdigitalstudios)
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10:20 PM | For the First Time, We've Found an Exoplanet at the "Frost Line"
Astronomers have documented thousands of exoplanets to date, but they have yet to find one near the "frost line" — an important boundary in understanding how planets form. The discovery of Kepler-421b now changes that.Read more...
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10:02 PM | explore-blog: As if we needed another reason to appreciate how...
explore-blog: As if we needed another reason to appreciate how amazing bees are: Artist and beekeeper Ren Ri makes breathtaking sculptures using plastic, salvaged wood, and a swarm of bees. Well, to be fair, the bees did half the work :)
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9:38 PM | Why Are Lego Washing Up on the Beaches of Cornwall?
The beaches at Cornwall in England are beautiful, majestic ... and the repository for some seriously weird plastic garbage. For years, Lego pieces with nautical themes have been washing up on these shores. But why?Read more...
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9:33 PM | Living in world without antibiotic drugs
The public lecture and panel discussion on anti-microbial resistance co-organized with the Biochemical Society, Society for General Microbiology, and Society of Biology sought to open debate about living in world without antibiotic drugs. The crux of the matter is that anti- microbial resistance is a continuous force that we must counteract. This is due to […]
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8:23 PM | Why Do We Have Blood Types?
More than a century after their discovery, we still don't really know what blood types are for. Do they really matter? Reporter Carl Zimmer investigates.Read more...
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8:21 PM | Thoughts on QED+20
The potential of the comprehensive formalization of mathematics has fascinated me for quite some time - even though I am a working mathematician whose research is not part of the area conventionally known as “formal methods”. Last week, I took the opportunity to attend the QED+20 workshop which was part of the Vienna Summer of Logic and which celebrates anniversary of the original QED workshops and manifesto. 20 years ago, the QED project set out to create “a computer system […]
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7:40 PM | This Lovely Music Video Is Also a Lesson in How Cells Grow
British digital artist Andy Lomas has created a virtual model of cellular growth, allowing us to watch as intricate bio-inspired sculptures slowly take shape. Recently, he collaborated with techno-producer Max Cooper to create a music video titled Seething, named for the unstoppable and unrelenting propagation of life.Read more...
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7:30 PM | Good Chocolate, Like Good Steel, Must Be Tempered
The process of tempering, in both steel and chocolate, is the same. The material is heated and cooled until its internal structure is such that it can be carried by a warrior with honor. Here's how to make chocolate, or a sword, or a chocolate sword.Read more...
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7:00 PM | History of Imaging – Part 2
                              We previously discussed light and the study of optics. From understanding how rays of light react with different materials and the human eye, the microscope was invented – a groundbreaking discovery for scientific progress. Think …
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7:00 PM | What Did Doctors Learn By Scaring Toddlers in the "Risk Room"?
Remember the twisted experiment to see what happens when kids think they've broken a treasured toy ? The doctor in charge of that study also studied children's responses to a creepy "Risk Room." Their behavior in the room revealed surprising things about the child's future behavior.Read more...
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6:40 PM | Sixth Grader's Science Fair Project Rattles Ecologists
By showing that lionfish can live in fresh water, 12 year-old Lauren Arrington has alerted ecologists to the potential for these fish to migrate upstream in rivers where they would pose a threat to the ecosystem.Read more...
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6:00 PM | It's Time to Destroy Corporate Personhood
The United States in the only country in the world that recognizes corporations as persons. It's a so-called "legal fiction" that's meant to uphold the rights of groups and to smooth business processes. But it's a dangerous concept that's gone too far — and could endanger social freedoms in the future.Read more...
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5:48 PM | New study suggests HIV seeds early as virus returns in ‘cured’ baby
The "Mississippi baby" - a child who generated a great deal of excitement last year after being seemingly cured of HIV - now has detectable levels of HIV in the blood, according to doctors and health officials. Descrier - news and culture magazine
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5:30 PM | New 'Quantum Bounce' Theory Explains How Black Holes Become White
Some cosmologists speculate that black holes end their lives by transforming into their exact opposite — so-called 'white holes ' that pour all the material they gobbled up back into space. A new theory based on quantum gravity could explain how this is possible.Read more...
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5:27 PM | Autism and Parents: Reducing stress
Raising an autistic child can be a gift. Unfortunately it can also be challenging and stressful. Let’s be real, it’s stressful just being a parent, throw in a disability that […]

Dykens E.M. & Fisher M.H. (2014). Reducing Distress in Mothers of Children With Autism and Other Disabilities: A Randomized Trial, Pediatrics , DOI: doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-3164

Citation
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5:12 PM | The first ever picture of the Mandelbrot set, from this 1978...
The first ever picture of the Mandelbrot set, from this 1978 paper by Robert Brooks and J. Peter Matelski. For comparison, here’s a more modern representation of this fractal wonder:  (via Cliff Pickover)
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4:48 PM | americanguide: MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA The...
americanguide: MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. … “I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” […]
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4:13 PM | "I meet many people offended by evolution, who passionately prefer to be the personal handicraft of..."
“I meet many people offended by evolution, who passionately prefer to be the personal handicraft of God than to arise by blind physical and chemical forces over aeons from slime…What they wish to be true, they believe is true. Only 9 percent of Americans accept the central finding of modern biology that human beings (and all other species) have slowly evolved by natural processes from a succession of more ancient beings with no divine intervention needed along the way.” - […]
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3:54 PM | Hot Weather Science
Too hot to bike? Pool too crowed?  Try some hot weather science! Just find a shady spot in the driveway, pull out the garden hose and you can experiment with siphons, water rockets, and fire-proof water balloons. Click on the experiment names to read directions and learn more about the science. Have fun!
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2:13 PM | Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe
Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.
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2:00 PM | You have to learn how to die
…if you want to want to be alive. The rock band Wilco already said it back in 2002 when they released the much-acclaimed album […] Read more The post You have to learn how to die appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:New hope against tuberculosis: spectinamides The perfume of chemokines: how cancer manipulates our defenses We can learn a lot from a walk with real numbers
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1:01 PM | #HIBAR: Why Using Age as a Proxy for Testosterone is a Bad Deal.
This is a post-publication peer review (HIBAR: “Had I Been A Reviewer”) of the following paper: Levi, M., Li, K., & Zhang, F. (2010). Deal or no deal: Hormones and the mergers and acquisitions game. Management Science 56, 1462 -1483. A citeable version of this post-publication peer review can be found at SSRN: Schönbrodt, Felix […]
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1:00 PM | Organizing a Gender Balanced Conference
There is a lot of discussion on the internet about highly skewed speaker lists at symposia and conferences. For the past year, I’ve been co-organizing a small conference (~110 people) with Michael Angilletta where we’ve been practicing some of the approaches I developed and blogged about earlier for organizing a seminar series. However, in ecology […]
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1:00 PM | Thank The Moon, Think of Mars #Apollo45
Image Credit: NASA When US astronauts successfully walked on the moon 45 years ago, it was the culmination of years of science being leveraged to do something that most thought was impossible. Unfortunately, this was not done solely for the sake of science - it was also to have a leg up on the Soviet Union. The US was "behind" in the Cold War space race, since the Soviet Union launched the first satellite (Sputnik) and the first man in space (Yuri […]
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12:00 PM | Climate Change Already Having Profound Impacts on Lakes in Europe
For perspective on how climate change is affecting lakes, those of us here in the U.S. can just look across the pond, where scientists and the agencies involved in meeting the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic. Not only are extreme weather events such as droughts…
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10:49 AM | What Makes Us Laugh?
Scientists ask people what makes them laugh, and share the answers they collected in a fun video.
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10:31 AM | Summertime Science
by Kimberly Moynahan Science in Society subject editor Going on a picnic this summer or to the beach? How about fishing? Or do you prefer to stay home and garden? Let’s take a look at this summer’s Science Borealis blog feed to see the ways in which science overlaps with your summer fun. Science in Your Picnic Basket Dirke Steinke (@dirch3) points out that all this time you might have been eating undiscovered species, particularly fungus.  Through DNA analysis, “last year […]
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