Posts

January 29, 2015

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3:00 AM | How Did Edgar Allan Poe Manage To Describe The Big Bang In 1848?
They mocked when Edgar Allan Poe published his prose poem "Eureka" in his last year of life, describing how the universe had begun with a single "primordial particle" that exploded outwards in "one instantaneous flash." But 80 years later, cosmologists started realizing that Poe had been on to something.Read more...
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2:00 AM | Genghis Khan's genetic legacy endures in the Y-chromosomes of millions of male descendants.
Genghis Khan's genetic legacy endures in the Y-chromosomes of millions of male descendants. Now, researchers have found evidence for the existence of ten other men who may have founded highly successful Y-chromosome lineages in Asia, beginning as early as 2100 B.C. Nature's Ewen Calloway has the details.Read more...
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1:53 AM | Questions from Jeremy Fox about the LTEE, part 1
Over at the Dynamic Ecology blog, Jeremy Fox asked me some interesting questions about the history, philosophy, and science of the E. coli long-term evolution experiment. Perhaps mistakenly—in terms of time management, not my interest!—I agreed to try to answer … Continue reading →
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1:53 AM | Questions from Jeremy Fox about the LTEE, part 1
Over at the Dynamic Ecology blog, Jeremy Fox asked me some interesting questions about the history, philosophy, and science of the E. coli long-term evolution experiment. Perhaps mistakenly—in terms of time management, not my interest!—I agreed to try to answer … Continue reading →
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12:40 AM | When Will We Stop Discovering Dinosaurs?
By recent counts, paleontologists have discovered upwards of 500 unique genera and over 1,000 different species of non-avian dinosaurs. How many have yet to be unearthed? More to the point: How many dinosaurs are left?Read more...
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12:00 AM | To commemorate 100 years of making maps, National Geographic's Cathy Newman has penned a fascinating
To commemorate 100 years of making maps, National Geographic's Cathy Newman has penned a fascinating summary of the organization's cartographic influence on not just nature journalism, but on history and science itself. To date, NatGeo has produced 438 insert maps, 10 atlases, dozens of globes, and 3,000 maps for the magazine. Read more...

January 28, 2015

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9:57 PM | othmeralia: The Othmer Library recently received a wonderful...
othmeralia: The Othmer Library recently received a wonderful donation of 17 various editions of the works of Paul De Kruif.  One of the most amazing things about this comprehensive set of books is that they all have different covers or dust jackets spanning the 1920s to the 1990s.  Two editions of Microbe Hunters and Hunger Fighters are illustrated by wood cut artist Betrand Zandig.  You can see how striking his black and white art is in this selection of covers and […]
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9:57 PM | othmeralia: The Othmer Library recently received a wonderful...
othmeralia: The Othmer Library recently received a wonderful donation of 17 various editions of the works of Paul De Kruif.  One of the most amazing things about this comprehensive set of books is that they all have different covers or dust jackets spanning the 1920s to the 1990s.  Two editions of Microbe Hunters and Hunger Fighters are illustrated by wood cut artist Betrand Zandig.  You can see how striking his black and white art is in this selection of covers and […]
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9:46 PM | Why Carrots Taste Sweeter In Winter via ucresearch: UCLA’s Liz...
Why Carrots Taste Sweeter In Winter via ucresearch: UCLA’s Liz Roth-Johnson explains why carrots have more sugar when it’s cold outside. Because plants are immobile, they must develop defense techniques against predators and the severe cold in winter. For example, carrots have developed the physiological response of increasing their sugar content when it’s cold outside. This helps stop ice crystal formations and prevents damage to the carrot’s cells. Frost can do a lot […]
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9:40 PM | Two Cyclones Dance On The Indian Ocean
Eunice (left) and Diamondra (right) are a pair of tropical cyclones currently whirling about the Indian Ocean. The latter formed on January 26 and is projected to die out presently. Eunice, which was named just hours ago, is expected to intensify in the coming days.Read more...
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9:22 PM | Facebook just suggested a ghostwriter for my PhD
Wow! Facebook just suggested me an advertisement about a ghostwriter. The pitch: “You are successful. You have embarked upon a great career. You want to achieve a doctorate.” It’s not just that I think this is spam, it also seems highly unethical. To make things even worse, Facebook did not provide the usual options to… Continue Reading
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9:20 PM | New Technique Allows Bioengineers To "Reprogram" Genetic Code
Scientists at Stanford University have found a way to program DNA in such a way that genes can be turned on or off in living cells. Incredibly, the new tool can affect two different genes at the same time, an advance that will allow scientists to treat even the most complex genetic disorders.Read more...
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9:08 PM | MicroRNAs as Circulating Biomarkers
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short strands of RNA averaging between 19-24 nucleotides in length that were first discovered in C.elegans and subsequently shown to exist in species ranging from algae to humans (1). Speculated to be merely “junk” more than a decade ago, miRNAs have emerged as powerful regulators of a wide array of cellular processes […]
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8:56 PM | Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Modified Newtonian Dynamics A fan...
Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Modified Newtonian Dynamics A fan asks if Modified Newtonian Dynamics, a theory that attempts to explain the missing mass in the Universe without resorting to the existence of dark matter, is credible, or is it pseudoscience? To answer this Cosmic Query, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains MOND, as astrophysicists call it, to co-host Chuck Nice, touching on dark matter, dark gravity, and Newton’s Laws. But is it pseudoscience? No spoilers here: watch and learn for […]
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8:30 PM | How "Second Sound" Helps the Large Hadron Collider Work
Superfluids have many extraordinary properties. One of them is called "second sound" even though it doesn't have anything to do with sound waves. It does have something to do with making the Large Hadron Collider work, though. Find out why.Read more...
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8:08 PM | Everyday chemical exposure leads to early menopause
Seems like everything is killing us these days. Well ladies, you have one more thing that is causing you problems. New research has shown that women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower […]

Grindler, N., Allsworth, J., Macones, G., Kannan, K., Roehl, K. & Cooper, A. (2015). Persistent Organic Pollutants and Early Menopause in U.S. Women, PLOS ONE, 10 (1) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0116057

Citation
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8:08 PM | Why, Exactly, Does The Sun Turn Green?
Under the right conditions, the upper edge of the setting sun will blaze bright green just before dipping below the horizon. What causes these "green flashes"? The answer is more complicated than you probably realize.Read more...
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8:05 PM | Ask a Mortician- Human Taxidermy? If human taxidermy was easy,...
Ask a Mortician- Human Taxidermy? If human taxidermy was easy, everyone would do it! (Well, maybe not everyone). By: Ask a Mortician. Support on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/thegooddeath
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8:05 PM | We're in a Technological Arms Race with Bears for Our Food
It's almost impossible to secure yourself against a food raid from bears. That's because these giant mammals are clever tool users, and they share their tech knowledge with other bears nearby. As a result, bear-proofing technology rarely works for more than a couple of decades before every bear knows how to crack it. Read more...
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7:40 PM | Anthropologists Have Mapped All 61 Tattoos On Ötzi The Iceman
By using an innovative non-invasive photographic technique, European researchers have managed to locate and map the extensive set of tattoos on the exquisitely preserved remains of Ötzi the Iceman. Remarkably, they even found a previously unknown tattoo on his ribcage. Read more...
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7:14 PM | Under The Knife, Episode 5 - Human Skin Books Dr Lindsey...
Under The Knife, Episode 5 - Human Skin Books Dr Lindsey Fitzharris discusses the dark history behind anthropodermic bibliopegy, or binding books with human skin. Why was it done? And how exactly did tanners use human skin to create covers in the past? By: Under The Knife. Support at: http://www.patreon.com/UnderTheKnife
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6:32 PM | The hands that tinker with nuts and bolts behind research (a fantastic Nature News feature)
I was alerted this morning - via Malcolm Campbell - to an excellent news feature on Nature News - titled: "Not Your Average Technician" - on four individuals who are engaged in behind-the-scenes jobs, which nevertheless support the scientific and technological research work of many in more visible fields. NOTE: An indefatigable curator of the most interesting science news, Dr. Malcolm Campbell - I am honored to be his Scilogs colleague - continues to stimulate our minds with his daily... Read […]
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6:32 PM | The hands that tinker with nuts and bolts behind research (a fantastic Nature News feature)
I was alerted this morning - via Malcolm Campbell - to an excellent news feature on Nature News - titled: "Not Your Average Technician" - on four individuals who are engaged in behind-the-scenes jobs, which nevertheless support the scientific and technological research work of many in more visible fields. NOTE: An indefatigable curator of the most interesting science news, Dr. Malcolm Campbell - I am honored to be his Scilogs colleague - continues to stimulate our minds with his daily... Read […]
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6:32 PM | The hands that tinker with nuts and bolts behind research (a fantastic Nature News feature)
I was alerted this morning - via Malcolm Campbell - to an excellent news feature on Nature News - titled: "Not Your Average Technician" - on four individuals who are engaged in behind-the-scenes jobs, which nevertheless support the scientific and technological research work of many in more visible fields. NOTE: An indefatigable curator of the most interesting science news, Dr. Malcolm Campbell - I am honored to be his Scilogs colleague - continues to stimulate our minds with his daily... Read […]
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6:30 PM | Charles Townes, One Of The Fathers Of The Laser, Dies
Townes' science achievements are evident from how frequently he shows up Popular Science's archives.
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5:32 PM | A sanctuary for the abused elephants of Thailand Tucked away in...
A sanctuary for the abused elephants of Thailand Tucked away in a quiet village in Thailand, Boon Lott’s Elephant Sanctuary is a safe home for twelve elephants rescued from the cruelty of the tourist trade and the illegal logging industry. Join us as we meet a few of the sanctuary’s lucky inhabitants and the founder Katherine Connor, who is changing the fate of some very fortunate elephants. By: Earth Touch.
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5:31 PM | We, the scientific community, have failed you…
From time to time I'll use this space to share some great pieces written by others that make me think - and feel. The following is a courageous piece by one of my friends, Dr.  Michael D L Johnson (@blacksciblog) - who works in the Department of Immunology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Michael and I met when he invited me to speak at St. Jude on the value of social media outreach for researchers. He blogs at https://blackscienceblog.wordpress.com  […]
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5:15 PM | The Bee Economy Last May, a woman slowed down for a traffic...
The Bee Economy Last May, a woman slowed down for a traffic accident on I-95 in Delaware and saw something a bit odd: a man running away from the wreck tearing his clothes off and hitting himself. It turns out that the wrecked truck was carrying some 20 million honey bees from Florida to Maine. These bee-carrying trucks are responsible for some $15 billion of the U.S. economy. Put another way, the crops that depend on bee pollination - like apples and broccoli - account for about $40 billion […]
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4:41 PM | The Brain Scoop: Ask Emily #10 by thebrainscoop: We took a...
The Brain Scoop: Ask Emily #10 by thebrainscoop: We took a break from editing Peru footage to answer some of your questions and reassure you that I’m not dead!  Some FAQ’s answered in this episode:  MORE DISSECTIONS PLZ?!?!!!  What are museums doing wrong?  Is a Brain Scoop theme park in the works for the next 5 years?  Huge thanks to tumblr users propitlikeithot,  lauvtrekin dredreidel, mlarents, and magicondragonback for your questions!
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4:40 PM | What The World Would Look Like If Countries Were Scaled By Population
Redditor TeaDranks has created a super-interesting cartogram in which the size of each country is apportioned according to population. Suddenly, the largest countries in the world don't look so mighty — Russia and Canada, we're looking at you.Read more...
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