Posts

July 31, 2014

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8:51 PM | Report, Initiatives Aim to Take Action on Climate Change
Editor’s Note: While Tim Profeta is on vacation, Jeremy Tarr, policy associate in the Climate and Energy Program at Duke’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, will author The Climate Post. Tim will post again August 28. A new report from the White House Council of Economic Advisers finds that for each decade of delay, policy actions on climate…
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6:32 PM | CSU Forecasters Reaffirm Forecast for Quiet Hurricane Season
With the peak of the 2014 hurricane season approaching, researchers at Colorado State University reaffirmed their June forecast for a relatively quiet summer. CSU meteorologists Phil Klotzbach and William Gray said today they think nine tropical storms will form in the Atlantic Basin — which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea —…
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6:00 PM | Why Would Evolution Favor These Insane Adaptations?
Life has been evolving on Earth for approximately 3.5 billion years. And in that time, to quote Jurassic Park's chaos theorist Ian Malcolm, "Life, uh… finds a way." Life has found ways to flourish in an incredible number of habitats, and this has led to some almost unbelievable adaptations.Read more...
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5:33 PM | Mitochondria and Anti Aging
I’m sure you can all relate, you go to fix the sink and in the process you build a new kitchen on accident. Anyone… no? Well that is sort of […]

Lisanti, S., Tavecchio, M., Chae, Y., Liu, Q., Brice, A., Thakur, M., Languino, L. & Altieri, D. (2014). Deletion of the Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 Uncovers Global Reprogramming of Metabolic Networks, Cell Reports, DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.06.061

Citation
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4:15 PM | Here's Our Best Look Yet At Rosetta's "Rubber Ducky" Comet
The Rosetta spacecraft has been chasing comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for more than a decade. Now, with arrival less than a week away, the distance between the spacecraft and its quarry is rapidly shrinking. Meanwhile, Rosetta continues to return clearer and clearer images of the double-lobed "rubber ducky comet." Read more...
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3:40 PM | The Most Accurate Model Yet Of Jupiter's Bizarre Magnetic Field
It may look like a giant ball oozing with earthworms, but it's actually a simulation of Jupiter's massive and complex magnetosphere — a magnetic field that extends more than four million miles from its surface.Read more...
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3:27 PM | #Brain article of interest: Reward and Punishment in the Brain
From NeuroLogica BlogRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/UIhu53
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2:52 PM | Science fiction for science communication
Editor's Note: This is a guest blog post by Madeleine Stone. Madeleine is an environmental science PhD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania and an avid science communicator. She blogs regularly at The Lonely Spore and The Science of Fiction. Follow her on Twitter. Hey there, science communicators! Do you like science fiction? You might say I had a nerdy childhood. While most girls my age were playing with Barbies and Polly Pockets, my free time was spent watching […]
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2:30 PM | Microwaving Light Bulbs Is Genuinely Useful (And Entertaining)
I love finding new things to put in the microwave. Say, for instance, an incandescent light bulb, which can test your microwave for a number of issues, besides just looking awesome. Even a non-functioning bulb can work, so dig out the dusty old bulbs you have at the back of the closet. Read more...
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2:08 PM | Modern Polar Explorers on the Hunt For Ancient Sea Monsters
In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. Now, the team is planning yet another project, and are getting ready for another season on the Arctic slopes.
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2:00 PM | The Representative Disapproves
Representative Jackie Speier (CA, 14th District) has taken Science Magazine to task (PDF of full letter here) for their controversial cover and controversial response to criticism of that cover. The July ll issue of Science Magazine featured a lurid cover photograph of transgender women in … Continue reading →
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1:30 PM | The fantasy of cryonics in an unexpected place
We all seek immortality in some way. Death has been a terror of nearly all since humans first started realizing that everybody dies. After all, no one wants to face the end of everything that one has been, is, and will be, so much so that a key feature of many religions is a belief…
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12:05 PM | 7 things you should know about Ebola virus
7 things you should know about Ebola virus Continue reading →
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11:21 AM | Not quite Monday Micro – which nasty microbes would you rank in the top 10?
On Monday I was asked to go on the radio and comment on an article that appeared in the NZ Herald (syndicated from The Independent) entitled “What’s the world’s biggest health risk?”. The article lists an infectious diseases ‘Top Ten’ which looks like this: 1. Ebola – as of 23 July 2014, there have been [...]
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11:00 AM | Fun with science blogging (two Flapping years) | Dean Burnett
The Brain Flapping blog is two years old today. In that time, it has caused many bizarre things to occur. Here are some of themTwo years ago today, this blog appeared on the Guardian website. The fact that youre reading this should be pretty conclusive proof that its still there. There was no real fanfare or buildup beforehand, it was just there suddenly. It came about after the Guardian Science people put out an open call for proposals for new blogs to expand their science blog network. Seeing […]
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8:07 AM | July linkfest
It's linkfest time again. All the links, in one handy post. First up — I've seen some remarkable scientific visualizations recently. For example, giant ocean vortices spiralling across the globe (shame about the rainbow colourbar though). Or the trillion-particle Dark Sky Simulation images we saw at SciPy. Or this wonderful (real, not simulated) video by the Perron Group at MIT: Staying with visuals, I highly recommend reading anything by Mike Bostock, especially if you're into web […]
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3:17 AM | More Than Just Black… Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is...
More Than Just Black… Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is considered the first known painting to accurately depict the stars of the night sky and the Milky Way. Can you find Ursa Major? Interestingly, this painting is said to date from around 1609, yet that means it predates Galileo’s first published telescope observations by a year (Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius was published in 1610, although he made observations in 1609), and he likely […]
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3:00 AM | Long-Term Couples Develop Interconnected Memory Systems
New research from Macquarie University in Australia reveals that intimate couples become part of an interpersonal cognitive system where each is dependent on the other to fill in certain memory gaps. Read more...
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2:54 AM | I think of all the -ographies, “selenography” is my...
I think of all the -ographies, “selenography” is my favorite. Enjoy these historical atlases of the moon, the earliest studies of the moon’s surface features (AKA “selenography”). The above were drawn by: Michel van Langren (1645) Johannes Hevelius (1647) Giovanni Cassini (1679) Tobias Mayer (1749) Richard Andree (1881) Henry White Warren (1879) Previously: Check out Galileo’s watercolor illustrations of the moon, and find out how a few simple sketches
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2:23 AM | We set a record for “turning Joe strange colors and...
We set a record for “turning Joe strange colors and setting him on fire” in this week’s OKTBS video.  Normal skin tones and sleeves will return next week!
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1:00 AM | New measurements, published today in Nature, indicate the moon is shaped "like a lemon with a small
New measurements, published today in Nature, indicate the moon is shaped "like a lemon with a small bulge in the middle." That's okay, of course; Earth isn't perfectly round, either . The Sun, on the other hand, may be the most perfect natural sphere in the known Universe . Read more...

July 30, 2014

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11:26 PM | Declan Waugh continues his distortion of Finnish fluoride research
In my last post (Another fluoridation whopper from Declan Waugh) I described how Declan Waugh (a self-professed “scientist and fluoride researcher”) badly misrepresented data from a Finnish study which had concluded the prevalence of ailments attributed to fluoridation were “likely connected … Continue reading →
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11:26 PM | Declan Waugh continues his distortion of Finnish fluoride research
In my last post (Another fluoridation whopper from Declan Waugh) I described how Declan Waugh (a self-professed “scientist and fluoride researcher”) badly misrepresented data from a Finnish study which had concluded the prevalence of ailments attributed to fluoridation were “likely connected … Continue reading →
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10:51 PM | ellliot: gnostic-forest: emkaymlp: mj-the-scientist: invaderx...
ellliot: gnostic-forest: emkaymlp: mj-the-scientist: invaderxan: Mars. In true colour. Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like. Why does this not have more notes?!? YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET If you don’t think that’s the […]
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10:38 PM | Earth is definitely warming… thanks to this sick burn! I know...
Earth is definitely warming… thanks to this sick burn! I know what you’re thinking. There’s no way you’re gonna watch seven minutes of C-SPAN2. You wouldn’t even watch seven minutes of C-SPAN1, amirite?! What if I told you that contained within this seven minutes is the most epic smackdown of congressional climate science denial ever uttered in the halls of the U.S. Capitol? Perhaps the most sick and depressing call-out of those who refuse to accept science since […]
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9:40 PM | Danish Archaeologists Find Four Human Pelvic Bones Attached To A Stick
Researchers working near the Alken Enge wetlands in East Jutland have unearthed a rather gruesome artifact dating back to the First Century A.D. — a wooden stick bearing the pelvic bones of four fallen warriors. Read more...
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9:38 PM | Quick Heads Up For Some Spooky Action At A Distance Talk
Late, late, late I am in getting this out to you, but I’m doing another webcast/podcast for Virtually Speaking Science today. I’ll be talking to my MIT colleague, David Kaiser, who is a physicist and a historian of science in our Science Technology and Society program.  He’s also an excellent popular science writer, and we’ll […]
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9:38 PM | Quick Heads Up For Some Spooky Action At A Distance Talk
Late, late, late I am in getting this out to you, but I’m doing another webcast/podcast for Virtually Speaking Science today. I’ll be talking to my MIT colleague, David Kaiser, who is a physicist and a historian of science in our Science Technology and Society program.  He’s also an excellent popular science writer, and we’ll […]
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9:22 PM | 3D Fractals ^_^
I my last post I told you that in Stuttgart at HFT we had an interesting presentation of some nice fractals in 3D, so I decided to Google it to find some nice photos, and I found THIS. Absolutely wonderful things, I … Continue reading →
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9:09 PM | 5 Extreme Animals That Can Take the Heat—And Cold
The Alaska wood frog has set a new record for cold endurance. See what other species can handle extreme temperatures.
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