Posts

September 22, 2014

+
6:24 PM | Where Did The Thoughtful Animal Go?
If you’ve been paying attention, you’ve no doubt noticed that things have been a little quiet around here. While this blog isn’t dead, per se, it’s on an extended hibernation.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:51 AM | Manh(a)ttan Recap: Sex, Lies, and Subterfuge [SPOILERS]
In physics, “spooky action at a distance” is a colloquial term for the famous EPR paradox, devised by Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen in the 1930s to describe the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 21, 2014

+
11:42 PM | Physicists on Ice: Exploring the Physics of Curling
Last Friday I joined a contingent of Caltech physicists (including the Time Lord) for an afternoon of curling — yeah, you heard me, curling — in honor of Caltech theoretical physicist... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
10:48 PM | A Rather Important Anniversary
I’m terrible at remembering anniversaries and worse at communication, so this post commemorating an important anniversary is a day late. Lockwood reminded me that yesterday marked our fourth... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:53 PM | Crab Moves in Under Chrysler Building; Refuses to Budge
Japanese artist Aki Inomata created a series of 3D-printed hermit crab homes after learning that the land under the French Embassy in Tokyo changed from being French to being Japanese in 2009 and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
4:43 PM | Putting Science in Action in Swaziland
In 2012, the Scientific American Science in Action award became part of Google Science Fair. Last month, one of the judges for both, T.H. Culhane, traveled to Swaziland to work with our 2012 winners... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 20, 2014

+
12:31 PM | Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens
As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:40 AM | Physics Week in Review: September 20, 2014
On the latest episode of the Know Brainer Podcast, I chatted with host Christina Ochoa about Self- Experimentation, Time and Identity, and Body Fluids in Art. It’s available on iTunes or via... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:03 AM | If Neurons Could Talk
Immy Smith does it all – cartooning, fine art, neuroscience and taking part in the art+science “collaborative of polymathic artists”, Imagining Science.  Smith is even visiting... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 19, 2014

+
5:26 PM | Why did Pirates Fly the Jolly Roger?
The “pirate brand” has long been tied to the skull and crossbones—the Jolly Roger—as a symbol of terror on the high seas. The Times hails the ominous design as a magnificent exercise in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
5:26 PM | Why did Pirates Fly the Jolly Roger?
The “pirate brand” has long been tied to the skull and crossbones—the Jolly Roger—as a symbol of terror on the high seas. The Times hails the ominous design as a magnificent exercise in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:06 PM | These adorable giant African rats detect land mines and TB for a living
So yesterday, I adopted an unborn land-mine-detecting African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus) from Tanzania. Did I spend 20 minutes figuring out what I was going to call it, as one of my... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:52 AM | Under the Deep Sea (A Little Mermaid Parody)
Those of you following this blog know that I love me a great science music video parody. This awesome one from College Humor does not disappoint! Marine biologists will celebrate this awesome video... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:34 AM | Shields and Spears
I love when this group of Alaskan paleoartists has a show – I even have one of their past postcards framed and decorating my sons’ robot-and-dinosaur themed bedroom. Scott Elyard, Raven... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 18, 2014

+
2:28 AM | Symphony of Science Turns 5 Years Old Today!
Who doesn’t love the first, the original “Symphony of Science” tune, “Carl Sagan – ‘A Glorious Dawn’ ft Stephen Hawking”? This song was posted five... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 17, 2014

+
8:59 PM | In Case You’re Tempted to Think 3D Modeling All Looks the Same
I initially contacted Bryan Christie to request permission to feature his spectacular cheetah illustration in this year’s blitz. He agreed, and so here it is, in all its glory: But he also... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
7:41 PM | Chinese Sturgeon Give Up, Stop Breeding in Polluted Yangtze River
When an endangered species stops breeding, you know its days are probably numbered. In China the countdown has apparently begun for the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis).... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:35 PM | Quantum Short 2014 Film Contest Accepting Entries
When the 2008 Bond film came out with the title Quantum of Solace, science fans may have been hoping for a plot that hinged on quantum physics. Bond didn’t deliver, but there are some pretty... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 16, 2014

+
8:53 PM | This Rare White Possum Could Soon Be a Ghostly Memory
A ghost lives in the Daintree Rainforest in northeastern Queensland, Australia. There, on a single mountain range located 1,100 meters above sea level, scientists have recently found what may be the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
6:46 PM | A Delicate Army of Franken-Fairies
When tallying up a list of materials to use in assembling delicate fairy sculptures, bug parts might not be first on your average list. But for sculptor Cedric Laquieze, who is fascinated with... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 15, 2014

+
6:54 PM | Book Review: Island on Fire
Island on Fire: The extraordinary story of Laki, the volcano that turned eighteenth-century Europe dark By Witze, A. & Kanipe, J. PROFILE-BOOKS 224 pages | Hardcover 1st edition | April... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
6:54 PM | Book Review: Island on Fire
Island on Fire: The extraordinary story of Laki, the volcano that turned eighteenth-century Europe dark By Witze, A. & Kanipe, J. PROFILE-BOOKS 224 pages | Hardcover 1st edition | April 2014 ISBN 978-178125-0044   Volcanoes are no unusual sight on Iceland and yet the eruption that started June 8, 1783 in the southern district of [...]
+
4:42 PM | Playing What-If With Parasites
Who could be better positioned for a bit of speculative biology than a parasitologist? Artist and parasitologist Tommy Leung has a mind for puzzling out species networks, and he puts it to – no... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:01 AM | Manh(a)ttan Recap: Dead in the Water [SPOILERS]
The British are coming! The British are coming! To Manh(a)ttan, that is. This week’s episode (“The Second Coming”) finds our intrepid community of physicists eagerly awaiting their... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
1:40 AM | A Wondrous Look Inside a Tuft of Grass
500 years ago, artist and engraver Albrecht Dürer took the time to carefully and meticulously paint the >Great Piece of Turf. In both the Northern and Southern European Renaissance, studies in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 14, 2014

+
10:09 AM | Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast
The German naturalist F. W. H. Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769-1859) is remembered as great geographer and explorer (maybe his name is even the most common on topographic maps), but... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
10:09 AM | Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast
The German naturalist F. W. H. Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769-1859) is remembered as great geographer and explorer (maybe his name is even the most common on topographic maps), but his early education focused on mining engineering (and economy, as wished by his mother) and he made some important contributions to geology, for [...]

September 13, 2014

+
9:51 PM | Paper Dragons Redefine an Ancient Art
Paper cutting as an art form is almost as old as paper itself. Traditionally, though, paper cuts are 2-dimensional, almost cartoonish depictions of scenes because of the nature of the process: either... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:15 AM | Physics Week in Review: September 13, 2014
This week on Virtually Speaking Science, I chatted with Caltech’s Spiros Michalakis about quantum computing, quantum information, and when we might expect Google to have a quantum computer... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 12, 2014

+
7:54 PM | 5 Ways to Thwart Illegal Drug Dealing Online
Recent reports from ABC News and the UK’s Daily Mail suggest eBay is providing a platform for sellers engaged in an illegal prescription drug trade. An ecommerce pioneer now ranked number 250 on the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1234
93 Results