Posts

October 31, 2014

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6:17 PM | Build-A-Monster From the Inside Out
Spongelab has taken their popular Build-a-Body educational anatomy app and given it a Halloween makeov- umm, makeover is the wrong word. Halloween skin?  No, that’s not it. Ew. Build-a-Monster!... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:15 PM | The (Zombie-)Toad-in-the-Hole
May 8, 1733 two workers, Anders Halfwarder and Olof Sigräfwer, reported excited to superintendent Johan Gråberg, who was inspecting the quarry of Nybro near the village of Wamlingebo (Gotland,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:00 PM | Unsettling Blood
Fine artist Elaine Whittaker is challenging us to see ourselves through the eyes of one of humanity’s greatest killers. Take a close look. The Swarm, a work made up of encaustic and over 1500... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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11:53 AM | One Week left to apply for Society for Wetland Scientists Undergrad Mentoring Program
Undergraduate College Students interested in Environmental Science Careers should apply this mentoring program to attend the annual science conference of Society of Wetland Scientists. Attending... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:57 AM | The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup This Fall
So much good scienceart on display… where to begin!? EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 30, 2014

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4:45 PM | How it feels to be #BlackandSTEM and a Woman
I was sitting on this post for a while now. I said I would publish it this week, but I already felt procrastination kicking in. It was going to get pushed into next week or later. Then I got a tweet... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:05 PM | Astrobiology Roundup: Planets, Moons, and Stinky Comets
Scientific discoveries across all fields just keep coming and coming. Here’s a small assortment of goodies from the past couple of weeks. How do you form planets around stars in triple systems?... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 29, 2014

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1:39 PM | New Octopus Disguise Material for the Human World [Video]
It’s no doubt that, with a repertoire of everything from colorful coral to a poisonous sea snake, the octopus could win any costume contest handily. But while most of us are picking our way... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:05 AM | Will SciArt Find a Foothold on Ello?
Ello and their “you are not a product” manifesto swept through social media discourse like an eyeless smiling tornado a few weeks ago. Clearly, people are dissatisfied enough with... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:10 AM | Quarantines: Chaos and Confusion
There has been a quantum change in the past few days as to how healthcare workers (HCW) returning from the West African countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone are being treated. This was prompted by two cases. First, Dr. Craig Spencer, a physician with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF, aka Doctors Without Borders) developed a [...]

October 28, 2014

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4:07 PM | Urban Science Adventure: Make Autumn Leaf Lanterns
It’s fall and lovely outside, but you also want to keep your students or grand/children engaged in fun activities. Well, take a look up and then down. Those beautiful autumn leaves are your... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:30 PM | In Which Omar Khayyam Is Grumpy with Euclid
My math history class is currently studying non-Euclidean geometry, which means we’ve studied quite a few “proofs” of Euclid’s fifth postulate, also known as the parallel postulate. I’ve written... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 27, 2014

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10:32 PM | African Lions Face Extinction by 2050, Could Gain Endangered Species Act Protection
The African lion (Panthera leo leo) faces the threat of extinction by the year 2050, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service director Dan Ashe warned today. The sobering news came as part of the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:39 PM | Of Dragons and Geology
Johann Jakob Scheuchzer (1672-1733) was a Swiss physician, but also quite interested in travels and natural sciences. He published his observations on the culture and natural world of the Alps as “Itinera per Helvetiae alpinas regiones facta annis 1702-1711“. In the introduction by the editor we read: “The name of Scheuchzer will be famous …[] [...]
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5:39 PM | Of Dragons and Geology
Johann Jakob Scheuchzer (1672-1733) was a Swiss physician, but also quite interested in travels and natural sciences. He published his observations on the culture and natural world of the Alps as... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 26, 2014

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9:06 PM | You Should Know: Dr. Dr. Buddhini Samarasinghe and Jargon Wall
Welcome to the thirteenth installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing…Dr. Buddhini... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 25, 2014

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9:28 AM | Physics Week in Review: October 25, 2014
Halloween is a week away, and for those in search of costume ideas, here are some Physics-Themed Halloween Costumes to make zombie Einstein proud. If Jen-Luc Piquant weren’t rocking the vampire... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 24, 2014

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10:07 PM | Is Smell the Key To an Octopus’s Heart?
We know that octopuses have awesome visual systems and super-sensitive suckers. We have even learned that they can hear. But little scientific attention has been paid to their sense of smell. And new... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:49 PM | Complex Life Owes Its Existence To Parasites?
Is complex life rare in the cosmos? The idea that it could be rests on the observation that the existence of life like us – with large, energy hungry, complicated cells – may be... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 23, 2014

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10:46 PM | Indian Vultures Are Dying for Some Good News
When a species experiences catastrophic population declines as high as 99.9 percent, any bit of good news is cause for celebration—even if the news isn’t exactly great. India’s vultures now... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:42 PM | The Ebola Outbreak: Hopeful News from the Front Lines
The coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa by U.S. media has often seemed unremittingly grim. So it was with some trepidation that I boarded a plane for Sierra Leone. I was part of a field... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:33 PM | I want to see Season 3 of The Fab Lab with Crazy Aunt Lindsey!
I began blogging – at Urban Science Adventures ! © as an outlet and tester for my bigger, bolder dream – to create and star in my own Science Television program. At the time, 2006, there were no... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:13 PM | Why Ebola Is a Wake Up for Infection Control
Just as the CDC’s and other experts’ thoughts on Ebola and infection control have evolved with experience, mine have taken a slight twist as well. Given the missteps at Dallas’s Texas Presbyterian Hospital, which could have occurred in any community, I now agree with the current recommendations to centralize care in specialty centers. My perspective [...]

October 22, 2014

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6:42 PM | Whistleblower Who Exposed White House Tampering with Climate Science Dies
Rick Piltz passed away last Saturday. He spent decades working in the federal government and state government in Texas, and was a prominent whistleblower during the Bush administration. He later... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:36 PM | Wordless Wednesdays: Pouched Rats enjoying treats
I was preparing a post and suddenly realized I prepared the EXACT same post 6 months ago! So here it is. A sentiment so nice, I present it to you twice: Wordless Wednesday: Pouched Rat having a... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 21, 2014

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8:04 PM | Geologizing in the Realm of the Beast
September 8, 1762 the young son of the Yolle‘s, herding the flock of sheep, disappeared near the village of Laval in the province of Dauphiné (France). Only the poor remains of the boy, partially eaten by a mysterious creature, were recovered. The pastor of Laval, named Raphaël, later described an encounter with this creature: “the [...]
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8:04 PM | Geologizing in the Realm of the Beast
September 8, 1762 the young son of the Yolle‘s, herding the flock of sheep, disappeared near the village of Laval in the province of Dauphiné (France). Only the poor remains of the boy,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:10 PM | Aren’t Cancer Cells the Worst?
I try to find humor in some unfunny places, but I was never sure how to approach cancer. I first did a comic about cancer genes for my book What’s in Your Genes?, which seems to find the happy... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:32 PM | The Top 10 Martin Gardner Scientific American Articles
The “Mathematical Games” column in Scientific American that began in January 1957 is a legend in publishing, even though it’s been almost 30 years since the last one appeared. The... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:05 PM | Interview: The New Moon
Think you know about the Moon? I did, but then I started reading ‘The New Moon: Water, Exploration, and Future Habitation‘ (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and realized that my... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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