Posts

July 23, 2014

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12:00 PM | The Shocking Failure of British Rail Travel to Respect the Triangle Inequality
I spent about a month in the UK earlier this summer, and that meant I took a lot of train trips. I love riding trains: the feeling of endless possibility I get when I look at the departure boards,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:58 AM | Why is the grass always greener on social media?
Are you on social media? I’m willing to bet you’re on at least one channel (and it’s probably Facebook). In December 2013, 73% of adults online were using a social networking site... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:58 AM | Why is the grass always greener on social media?
Are you on social media? I’m willing to bet you’re on at least one channel (and it’s probably Facebook). In December 2013, 73% of adults online were using a social networking site... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 22, 2014

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9:26 PM | Wild Births are Big Steps for Rare California Condors and Mexican Wolves
Two species that couldn’t be more different have had similarly good news this week. First we go to Utah’s Zion National Park, where a pair of California condors (Gymnogyps californianus)... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:43 PM | Under the Dome: Scientific American Editor Talks to the Senate
Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation about the value of scientific research and development. Also... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:43 PM | Under the Dome: <i>Scientific American</i> Editor in Chief Talks to the Senate
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation about the value of scientific research and development. Also... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:27 PM | Female Octopus Strangles Mate, Then Eats Him
Octopuses do the darndest things. Like kill their mate during mating—by strangling him with three arms, according to new observations from the wild. Enterprising scientists Christine Huffard and Mike... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:40 AM | Largest aquatic insect in the world found in China
Hello, giant friend, and welcome. Please step through the hallowed gates of “World’s Biggest” and join your freakishly long, abnormally bulky peers. Now if you could all just arrange yourselves from... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 21, 2014

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10:28 AM | (Near) Garden of the Gods Reprise: Jackson Falls
Remember when we visited the Shrooms of the Gods at Garden of the Gods? That’s not the only wondrous place formed by the Pounds Sandstone. Reader Heliconia got to visit the area in early... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 20, 2014

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1:05 PM | Urease: an anti-microbial target in bacteria and fungi
Urea is a small molecule formed as proteins are broken down. It’s excreted in urine, but isn’t particularly toxic at low levels so it’s found in cells throughout the body. The... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 19, 2014

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6:32 PM | Green Thumbery: Water, Sunlight, and Data
All of those concerns I had at the beginning of the season have disappeared. My plants are healthy and flowering—and they’re slowly taking over the backyard, much to my delight. Now, if only I... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:32 PM | Green Thumbery: Water, Sunlight, and Data
All of those concerns I had at the beginning of the season have disappeared. My plants are healthy and flowering—and they’re slowly taking over the backyard, much to my delight. Now, if only I... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:07 AM | Physics Week in Review: July 19, 2014
It’s been a busy week on the physics front, so let’s get the shameless self-promotion out of the way upfront. I chatted with NPR’s Arun Rath on Weekend Edition about my recent New... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:23 AM | GUEST POST: Adjunct Instructors Petition for Change
Note: We’re pleased to feature a guest post by former Cocktail Party Physics co-blogger Ann (Lee) Kottner. Jennifer has graciously given me space to ask for some help from the science writing... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 18, 2014

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4:42 PM | Fraud, Deception And Lies: How Discovery’s Shark Week Became The Greatest Show On Earth
In 1842, the infamous showman P.T. Barnum unveiled a truly bizarre creature. In his autobiography, Barnum described it as “an ugly, dried-up, black-looking, and diminutive specimen… its arms thrown up, giving it the appearance of having died in great agony.” The Feejee mermaid, as the mummified remains were called, possessed the torso of a monkey with […]The post Fraud, Deception And Lies: How Discovery’s Shark Week Became The Greatest Show On Earth appeared […]
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4:17 AM | Scientific American Editor Testifies at U.S. Senate
At a hearing on the future of federal research investment, a science magazine editor and three noted scientists asked the U.S. Senate to support basic research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 17, 2014

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8:20 PM | When your cover photo says less about the story and more about who you imagine you’re talking to.
The choice of cover of the most recent issue of Science was not good. This provoked strong reactions and, eventually, an apology from Science‘s editor-in-chief. It’s not the worst apology... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:00 PM | “Gene Drives” and CRISPR Could Revolutionize Ecosystem Management
A note from the authors: With this guest blog post we want to share the key features of an innovative method for the high-precision genome editing of wild populations that has been outlined by our... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:02 PM | If you build it, they will come: designing microbial ecosystems in cheese
Microbes live in dense and diverse communities. There are billions of bacteria from thousands of species living together in your gut or in the soil. Sequencing the total DNA of these communities can... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:10 AM | Grown in Hot Rock Depths: The Geology of the Seahawks Super Bowl Rings Part I
The 184 diamonds in the Seahawks Super Bowl Championship rings can tell us a thing or three about Earth’s inner self. We’re still interrogating those valuable, shiny rocks (which... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 16, 2014

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9:14 PM | Baby Mountain Gorillas Celebrated by 40,000 People in Rwanda
Well I just found something to add to my bucket list. Earlier this month 40,000 people gathered in Rwanda for the 10th Kwita Izina, the annual ceremony that celebrates and names all of the known... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:02 PM | Successful science outreach means connecting with the people you’re trying to reach.
Let’s say you think science is cool, or fun, or important to understand (or to do) in our modern world. Let’s say you want to get others who don’t (yet) see science as cool, or fun,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:07 PM | What can teeth tell us about our prehistoric ancestors?
Our distant past is just that: the distant past. It’s this murky place that science is slowly filling in but the landscape still largely exists just on the periphery of our imagination, and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:07 PM | What can teeth tell us about our prehistoric ancestors?
Our distant past is just that: the distant past. It’s this murky place that science is slowly filling in but the landscape still largely exists just on the periphery of our imagination, and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:00 PM | Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again
This week, the only dedicated science illustration conference in the country is taking place in Boulder, CO. The Guild of Natural Science Illustrators’ annual gathering is in full swing and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:35 PM | Geologist’s Nightmares
Adventurer Roy Chapman Andrews mentions in an article published in 1922 in the “Asia Magazine” and later in his book “On the Trail of Ancient Man” (1926), a strange creature,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:35 PM | Geologist’s Nightmares
Adventurer Roy Chapman Andrews mentions in an article published in 1922 in the “Asia Magazine” and later in his book “On the Trail of Ancient Man” (1926), a strange creature, said to inhabit the Gobi-desert in Mongolia: “Then the Premier asked that, if it were possible, I should capture for the Mongolian government a specimen [...]
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4:34 PM | Amazing new Eminem Parody Music Video from A Capaella Science
The genius that is Tim Blais has come up with a fantastic new parody video to the tune of Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’. Called ‘Eminemium – Choose Yourself’, the video... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:00 AM | Wild Sex: Beyond the Birds and the Bees
Joy Reidenberg, comparative anatomist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, talks about her new PBS series Sex in the Wild, about the sex lives of elephants, orangutans, kangaroos and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

July 15, 2014

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7:57 PM | Tiger Skins Are Like Fingerprints—Could That Help Stop Smugglers and Poachers?
Last month forest rangers in India arrested a 21-year-old engineering student and his friend who had been caught carrying a tiger skin that they intended to sell for nearly $25,000. A few days... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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