Posts

March 26, 2015

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9:14 AM | 10 tortuous psychology studies you'll be glad you didn't participate in
Many psychology studies involve nothing more challenging for participants than sitting down with a short paper questionnaire and ticking off agreement or not with a series of anodyne statements. This post is not about that kind of research. Here, we take a tour of some rather more arduous and quirky experiments from the psychology archives. Participants in these studies were prodded, embarrassed, disgusted, scared, teased, bored and more (though not at once). It was all in the name of science, […]

March 23, 2015

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2:45 PM | Carefully timed questions can bias moral decisions
But most moral decisions are still influenced by prior commitments

March 16, 2015

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9:06 PM | Secular community groups are just as effective as religious ones in stimulating concern for others
Researchers around the world have found that subliminal reminders of religion can have some fairly profound effects (for example, encouraging honesty, obedience, revenge and staying power – and, as we saw in the previous post – even risk taking). But is this specifically about religion? Perhaps being reminded about god makes people virtuous – but [Read More...]

Thomson, N. (2015). Priming social affiliation promotes morality – Regardless of religion, Personality and Individual Differences, 75 195-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2014.11.022

Citation
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9:06 PM | Secular community groups are just as effective as religious ones in stimulating concern for others
Researchers around the world have found that subliminal reminders of religion can have some fairly profound effects (for example, encouraging honesty, obedience, revenge and staying power – and, as we saw in the previous post – even risk taking). But is this specifically about religion? Perhaps being reminded about god makes people virtuous – but [Read More...]

Thomson, N. (2015). Priming social affiliation promotes morality – Regardless of religion, Personality and Individual Differences, 75 195-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2014.11.022

Citation
+
9:06 PM | Secular community groups are just as effective as religious ones in stimulating concern for others
Researchers around the world have found that subliminal reminders of religion can have some fairly profound effects (for example, encouraging honesty, obedience, revenge and staying power – and, as we saw in the previous post – even risk taking). But is this specifically about religion? Perhaps being reminded about god makes people virtuous – but [Read More...]

Thomson, N. (2015). Priming social affiliation promotes morality – Regardless of religion, Personality and Individual Differences, 75 195-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2014.11.022

Citation
+
9:06 PM | Secular community groups are just as effective as religious ones in stimulating concern for others
Researchers around the world have found that subliminal reminders of religion can have some fairly profound effects (for example, encouraging honesty, obedience, revenge and staying power – and, as we saw in the previous post – even risk taking). But is this specifically about religion? Perhaps being reminded about god makes people virtuous – but [Read More...]

Thomson, N. (2015). Priming social affiliation promotes morality – Regardless of religion, Personality and Individual Differences, 75 195-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2014.11.022

Citation

March 02, 2015

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10:35 AM | "I did it for the team" – How outsiders cheat in pursuit of popularity
If you would do anything to stay popular with your team-mates, what might follow? Bending the rules? Cheating? Sabotage of rivals? An international team led by Stefan Thau of INSEAD investigated “pro-group” unethical behaviours, and they suggest the people most likely to connive to boost the team are those at its margins, fearful of exclusion.The experiment gave participants an easy opportunity to cheat at an anagram task, as the setup meant they themselves reported how […]
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