Posts

October 17, 2014

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9:11 PM | Panic Over Ebola Echoes 19th Century Fear Of Cholera
Fears of cholera coming shared a lot in common with fear of Ebola. Graetz 1883 © Historical Society of PennsylvaniaBy Sally Sheard, University of LiverpoolOn October 19 an inspector sent north from London to Sunderland reported a long-awaited arrival: the first British case of cholera. It was 1831 and as part of a second pandemic cholera had again progressed from its Bengal heartland through Europe, before reaching the Baltic ports. It was only a matter of time. read more
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12:00 PM | Ebola: Bats Get A Bad Rap When It Comes To Spreading Diseases
Credit: Diana Ranslam, CC BY-NCBy Alexandra Kamins, Colorado Hospital Association; Marcus Rowcliffe, Zoological Society of London, and Olivier Restif, University of Cambridge read more
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5:30 AM | Conventional Medical Centers May Be Unable Stop Ebola
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October 16, 2014

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12:01 AM | How Are Nurses Becoming Infected With Ebola?
Lab scientists working with Ebola use respirators, while surgical masks are deemed adequate for nurses at the front line. Credit: EPA/Anne-Marie Sanderson/DOH By C Raina MacIntyre read more

October 15, 2014

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12:00 PM | Frankenstein Meets Genetic Modification
Biology concepts – Frankenstein, asystole, ethics, genetically modified organisms, genetically modified foods, synthetic biology, decomposers, electroconvulsive therapyMary Shelly was wedded to Lord Byron, one of the great poets of the early 19th century. But she was fair writer on her own. Note the bolts on the monster’s neck. These were added by make-up artist Jack P. Pierce. He said they were electrodes, not bolts, even though Mary Shelly never actually wrote that the good doctor […]

Goldstein, D. (2014). Tempest in a Tea Pot: How did the Public Conversation on Genetically Modified Crops Drift so far from the Facts?, Journal of Medical Toxicology, 10 (2) 194-201. DOI: 10.1007/s13181-014-0402-7

Tufarelli V & Laudadio V (2013). Genetically Modified Feeds in Poultry Diet: Safety, Performance and Product Quality., Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24915369

Van Eenennaam AL & Young AE (2014). Prevalence and impacts of genetically engineered feedstuffs on livestock populations., Journal of animal science, 92 (10) 4255-78. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25184846

Snell C, Bernheim A, Bergé JB, Kuntz M, Pascal G, Paris A & Ricroch AE (2012). Assessment of the health impact of GM plant diets in long-term and multigenerational animal feeding trials: a literature review., Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 50 (3-4) 1134-48. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22155268

McCall WV, Andrade C & Sienaert P (2014). Searching for the mechanism(s) of ECT's therapeutic effect., The journal of ECT, 30 (2) 87-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24755719

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12:00 PM | Frankenstein Meets Genetic Modification
Biology concepts – Frankenstein, asystole, ethics, genetically modified organisms, genetically modified foods, synthetic biology, decomposers, electroconvulsive therapyMary Shelly was wedded to Lord Byron, one of the great poets of the early 19th century. But she was fair writer on her own. Note the bolts on the monster’s neck. These were added by make-up artist Jack P. Pierce. He said they were electrodes, not bolts, even though Mary Shelly never actually wrote that the good doctor […]

Goldstein, D. (2014). Tempest in a Tea Pot: How did the Public Conversation on Genetically Modified Crops Drift so far from the Facts?, Journal of Medical Toxicology, 10 (2) 194-201. DOI: 10.1007/s13181-014-0402-7

Tufarelli V & Laudadio V (2013). Genetically Modified Feeds in Poultry Diet: Safety, Performance and Product Quality., Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24915369

Van Eenennaam AL & Young AE (2014). Prevalence and impacts of genetically engineered feedstuffs on livestock populations., Journal of animal science, 92 (10) 4255-78. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25184846

Snell C, Bernheim A, Bergé JB, Kuntz M, Pascal G, Paris A & Ricroch AE (2012). Assessment of the health impact of GM plant diets in long-term and multigenerational animal feeding trials: a literature review., Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 50 (3-4) 1134-48. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22155268

McCall WV, Andrade C & Sienaert P (2014). Searching for the mechanism(s) of ECT's therapeutic effect., The journal of ECT, 30 (2) 87-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24755719

Citation

October 09, 2014

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1:00 PM | Are Ebola Drug Researchers Developing ‘Death Drugs’ That Could Wipe Out Humanity?
Credit: Institute of Responsible TechnologyBy Jon Entine, Genetic Literacy Project It’s perplexing that strident anti-GMO critics who regularly harp on the “danger” of harvesting a “foreign” gene from one species and inserting into another to improve crop performance or nutrition are mostly silent when the exact same process is used to engineer new drugs. The Ebola crisis and the desperate search for viable treatments highlights that […]
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1:00 PM | Herpesvirus, Not Zoos, Implicated In Baby Elephant Deaths
Elephants are among the most intelligent non-humans, arguably on par with chimpanzees, and both African and Asian elephants are endangered.  In 1995, 16-month old Kumari, the first Asian elephant born at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, died of a mysterious illness. In 1999, Gary Hayward of Johns Hopkins University and collaborators published their results identifying a novel herpesvirus, EEHV1 as the cause of Kumari's sudden death. They now show that severe cases like this one are […]

October 08, 2014

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1:00 PM | Universal Screening For Superbugs Too Costly
Though numerous experts and policy makers have called for hospitals to screen patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and isolate anyone testing positive to prevent the spread "Superbugs" in healthcare settings, it's too economically burdensome. Several states have enacted laws requiring patients be screened for MRSA upon admission but  two new abstracts, scheduled for presentation on Friday at IDWeek, the annual scientific meeting for infectious […]

October 07, 2014

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10:01 PM | Peptide Mimic: A Universal Ebola Drug Target
Researchers have created a molecule known as a peptide mimic that displays a functionally critical region of the virus that is universally conserved in all known species of Ebola. This new tool can be used as a drug target in the discovery of anti-Ebola agents that are effective against all known strains and likely future strains.  Ebola is a lethal virus that causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a 50 percent to 90 percent mortality rate. There are five known species of the virus. […]
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7:00 AM | Why Does This Immunologist Reject Vaccinations?
Vaccination is arguably medicine’s greatest success. It has eradicated smallpox and has saved millions from death and suffering from a growing list of preventable diseases. It’s surprising that it has so many critics. Most of them are either not educated in medical science (like Jenny McCarthy) or are educated but prefer to reject science in […]

October 06, 2014

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6:45 PM | Bits from HIV + Aging conference
Missed diagnoses and medical journeys The post Bits from HIV + Aging conference appeared first on Lab Land.

October 05, 2014

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2:08 PM | Cell Conversion And How DNA 'Bias' May Keep Some Diseases In Circulation
It's an early lesson in genetics: we get half our DNA from Mom, half from Dad. But that straightforward explanation does not account for a process that sometimes occurs when cells divide. Called gene conversion, the copy of a gene from Mom can replace the one from Dad, or vice versa, making the two copies identical. In a new study, researchers investigated this process in the context of the evolution of human populations. They found that a bias toward certain types of DNA sequences during […]

October 03, 2014

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12:30 PM | Blackflies Implicated In Nodding Syndrome
Though it has been researched for decades, the cause of nodding syndrome, a disabling disease affecting African children, is unknown. A new report suggests that blackflies infected with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus may be capable of passing on a secondary pathogen responsible for the spread of the disease. Concentrated in South Sudan, Northern Uganda, and Tanzania, nodding syndrome is a debilitating and deadly disease that affects young children between the ages of 5 and 15. […]

October 02, 2014

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4:36 PM | Gut bacteria are protected by host during illness
Sick mice divert internal resources to feed and protect beneficial gut bacteria, which appear to help fight infection, study finds.

September 30, 2014

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4:25 PM | This Month in Blastocystis Research (SEP 2014)
Before leaving for Venice and Padova to introduce Blastocystis to the XXX National Congress of The Italian Society of Protistology (ONLUS), allow me to kick in just a few words for the September issue of 'This Month in Blastocystis Research'.I will highlight two papers.The first is a study from the US (Yes, - US data! How rare is that?). The team investigated the prevalence and subtype distribution of Blastocystis among client-owned and shelter-resident cats and dogs. Studies of Blastocystis in […]

Krogsgaard LR, Engsbro AL, Stensvold CR, Vedel Nielsen H & Bytzer P (2014). The Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites is not Greater Among Individuals with IBS: a Population-Based Case-Control Study., Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25229421

Krogsgaard LR, Engsbro AL & Bytzer P (2013). The epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome in Denmark. A population-based survey in adults ≤50 years of age., Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology, 48 (5) 523-9. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23506174

Ruaux CG & Stang BV (2014). Prevalence of Blastocystis in Shelter-Resident and Client-Owned Companion Animals in the US Pacific Northwest., PloS one, 9 (9) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25226285

Wang W, Cuttell L, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H, Inpankaew T, Owen H & Traub RJ (2013). Diversity of Blastocystis subtypes in dogs in different geographical settings., Parasites & vectors, 6 215. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883734

Wawrzyniak I, Poirier P, Viscogliosi E, Dionigia M, Texier C, Delbac F & Alaoui HE (2013). Blastocystis, an unrecognized parasite: an overview of pathogenesis and diagnosis., Therapeutic advances in infectious disease, 1 (5) 167-78. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25165551

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September 29, 2014

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8:08 PM | From Berlin to Yerkes
Yerkes immunologist Guido Silvestri and colleagues have a paper in PLOS Pathogens shedding light on the still singular example of Timothy Brown, aka "the Berlin patient", the only human cured of HIV. The post From Berlin to Yerkes appeared first on Lab Land.
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6:14 PM | HIV vaccine insight via Rwanda
Rebuilding a shattered society is compatible with HIV vaccine research The post HIV vaccine insight via Rwanda appeared first on Lab Land.
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2:34 PM | Wellcome Trust Research Round-up: 29/09/14
Our fortnightly round-up of research news from the Wellcome Trust community… Immune system of newborn babies is stronger than previously thought The immune system of a newborn baby, although very different to an adult’s, may still be able to mount a strong immune defense, according to new findings that go against the received wisdom on […]

September 26, 2014

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1:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Idan Ben-Barak
Special thanks to Idan Ben-Barak for answering 5 questions about his recently featured book – Why Aren’t We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System Idan Ben-Barak holds a BSc in medical science and […]

September 25, 2014

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3:30 PM | Downstream effects: Comment on retracted narcolepsy paper retracted
The recent retraction of a paper in Science Translational Medicine reporting “one of the biggest things to happen” in narcolepsy research has claimed a bystander: A letter that commented on the no-longer-landmark article. The authors of the letter are with GlaxoSmithKline’s vaccine division. Here’s the new notice: Our Letter “Comment on ‘CD4+ T cell autoimmunity […]

September 22, 2014

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3:36 PM | Researcher Spotlight: Professor Helen McShane
Professor Helen McShane is a Professor of Vaccinology and Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow at Oxford University, where she leads a programme of research to develop a new vaccine for Tuberculosis (TB).  Here she gives an insight into the international nature of TB research and her motivations for starting, and continuing, research in this field. What are you working […]
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1:30 PM | Researcher who broke into lab up to nine retractions
Karel Bezouška, a researcher who broke into a lab refrigerator to tamper with an investigation into his work, has nine retractions. Here’s the retraction notice in Biochemistry for 2010’s “Cooperation between Subunits Is Essential for High-Affinity Binding of N-Acetyl-d-hexosamines to Dimeric Soluble and Dimeric Cellular Forms of Human CD69:” We wish to retract this article […]
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