X

Posts

April 17, 2014

+
8:02 PM | Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct
A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.
+
7:57 PM | 2.7-Million-Year-Old Forested Landscape Discovered under Greenland Ice Sheet
U.S. geologists have discovered what they say is a Pleistocene landscape preserved about 3 km beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet. “We found organic soil that has been frozen to the bottom of the ice sheet for 2.7 million years,” said Dr Paul Bierman, a geologist with the University of Vermont and the lead author of [...]
+
7:33 PM | Geo 730: April 17, Day 473: Whale Cove Sandstone
Looking more or less north from the southern end of the city of Depoe Bay, in the foreground we see the basalt of Depoe Bay. The buff cliffs under the buildings in the distance are composed of sandstone, referred to as the sandstone of Whale Cove (a small cove just to the south), and the darker rocks out on the point are made of Cape Foulweather basalt. Overall, this represents a pair of Columbia River Basalt flows separated by an interval of sedimentation. It wouldn't surprise me to find that […]
+
7:31 PM | A Visit To The Science Museum
Last Friday, budding paleontologist O, his mother and I visited the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Its paleo hall walks you through geologic time and is one of the best in the world! The gems and minerals exhibit isn’t bad either, but can use a larger variety of minerals and better labels. Speaking of labels, take some […]
+
7:31 PM | A Visit To The Science Museum
Last Friday, budding paleontologist O, his mother and I visited the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Its paleo hall walks you through geologic time and is one of the best in the world! The gems and minerals exhibit isn’t bad either, but can use a larger variety of minerals and better labels. Speaking of labels, take some […]
+
2:11 PM | Mountainous Fib: Andes Lie About Their Age
New research into the height of a very remote Andean plateau reveals just the latest surprise from the Earth's second-greatest mountain belt.
+
5:06 AM | A Few Deep-Seated Bedrock Landslides in Whatcom County
Shortly after the Oso/Hazel slide John Stark with the Bellingham Herald contacted me and asked if Whatcom County has any comparable landslide risks. In terms of likely imminent threat, there are no sites in Whatcom County that are directly comparable to the Hazel Slide in terms of size and pending risk. The Clay Banks (nooksack-river-temporarily-blocked-by-landslide, nooksack-river-blocking-landslide-notes, further-update-on-nooksack-river/clay-banks-via-DT, and […]

April 16, 2014

+
7:22 PM | The Chemical Secrets Found In Ancient Mars Rocks
Geologists have analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars those chemical signatures have revealed some secrets of the early Martian atmosphere. The atmospheres of Mars and Earth diverged in important ways very early in the 4.6 billion year history of our solar system. Of course, what everyone wants to know is if life ever existed there and how water flowed in the past. Those answers are still waiting to be found but researchers are learning where to look. read more
+
5:57 PM | Geo 730: April 16, Day 472: Depoe Bay, Abridged
Looking south-southwest from fnder the Depoe Bay Bridge, you can see the narrow notch the fleet must navigate to get into and out of the harbor. As hair-raising a prospect as that sounds to me, the lack of major currents- even those of tides, due to the restricted size of the basin- means that it's probably a less complicated and risky proposition than in larger estuaries. I'm pretty much guessing here, but I've heard stories about "crossing the bar" from several other Oregon locations, […]
+
1:41 PM | Deep-Sea Rocks May Make Smartphones
A new method extracts high-tech metals from common seafloor ores.
+
12:03 PM | Smithsonian Welcomes “Nation’s T. rex” to Washington, D.C.
On April 15 the National Museum of Natural History took delivery of a nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. Called the Nation’s T. rex, it will be the centerpiece of the […] The post Smithsonian Welcomes “Nation’s T. rex” to Washington, D.C. appeared first on Smithsonian Science.

April 15, 2014

+
6:25 PM | Dust is pretty amazing stuff. Check out more dusty science in...
Dust is pretty amazing stuff. Check out more dusty science in this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart: (Apologies for not including dusts of the pixie, angel, and bowl varieties in the video)
+
4:07 PM | Geo 730: April 15, Day 471: Trolling Depoe Bay
Under the Highway 101 bridge, at the southern end of the Depoe Bay metropolitan area, one can see the narrow neck of the channel into the eponymous bay. I can't tell, at the resolution of the photos I have, what form the basalt is taking here. I suspect it's predominantly breccia, perhaps with some isolated pillows, based on the patchy white spots. The latter are almost certainly composed of zeolites and/or calcite, which are signature accessory/secondary minerals with mafic to intermediate […]
+
2:00 PM | Geologic Wonder: See Grand Canyon from Space
In a new image taken from orbit, the Grand Canyon is visible slicing through the Kaibab Plateau.
+
1:58 PM | Soil colors – what more could you want?
Nuno Simões University of Algarve, Portugal E-mail: nuno_simoes58@hotmail.com We can easily see that soil color varies from one site to another, with depth, with topographic position and composition. Even color may be light brown in one side of the road and dark brown in the other. Whether for scientific purposes, or just curious, you study the colorimetric […]
+
12:30 PM | Major Life Extinctions Events Shows a computer simulation of our...
Major Life Extinctions Events Shows a computer simulation of our planet during its five major life extinctions events. via Habitability Lab.
+
4:27 AM | Perspective on Rain and Oso/Hazel Landslide
Rain gets a bum wrap when it comes to landslides. Heavy rain caused the landslide is a common statement. Record breaking rain caused landslide or landslides. Yes, there is a correlation of when landslides happen and rain events, but you can not blame the rain for making steep mountain slopes, steep shoreline bluffs or steep river valley bluffs. The blame the rain gets added to by forestry types as well. Any suggestion that a landslide was caused by logging leads to […]

April 14, 2014

+
9:04 PM | Geo 730: April 14, Day 470: Depoe Bay Geology
Not much "geology" to be seen in this photo, aside from a knob of basalt in the lower left. But make no mistake, there's a lot of geology going on here. I had long assumed (due to pillow basalts I'll show in coming days) that in this area, it was Siletz River Volcanics, the basement rock of the Coast Range. However, given the proximity of this area to Otter Rock and the ring dikes there, it should come as no surprise that this is actually Columbia River Basalt, of Miocene rather than Eocene […]
+
3:00 PM | Why Are There No Snakes In Ireland? Saint Patrick was actually...
Why Are There No Snakes In Ireland? Saint Patrick was actually the saint who banished all snakes from Ireland. There are no wild snakes in Ireland to this day! via Animalist.
+
12:00 PM | Life on Antarctic volcanoes Prof. Pete Convey talks about new...
Life on Antarctic volcanoes Prof. Pete Convey talks about new research suggesting that life survived past ice ages with the help of volcanoes. Read the full story at http://bit.ly/1kHnw10 via Antarctic Survey.

April 13, 2014

+
8:55 PM | What the Great Barrier Reef is Made Of [Australia]
Intro: When given the opportunity… or when in Rome… actually, I don’t think either of these really work too well, but what I’m trying to do is segway into my blog post about my stop-over in Cairn, Queensland, Australia; gateway the Great Barrier Reef! Having come via New South Wales and a month at my research field site […]
+
6:12 PM | The Harmony of Colors
The first "geological" maps used symbols to characterize single outcrops; later maps introduced shaded areas to display the distribution of specific rock-types, but due the high printing-costs these maps were printed only in black & white, making them hard to read - so let´s put some colors on that map...
+
5:08 PM | Geo 730: April 13, Day 469: Depoe Bay
Depoe Bay lays claim to the title of "the world's smallest navigable harbor," though as always, I'm skeptical of any claim to the world's most extreme anything. Not sayin' it ain't so, just sayin' I want evidence and definitions of terms. It was also one of the Oregon harbors (along with Brookings) that suffered substantial damage from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. A dramatic short video clip (several others are linked on this page) of the torrent into the bay can be seen at YouTube. I'd guess it's […]
+
12:40 PM | Professor Pete Convey talks about life around volcanic...
Professor Pete Convey talks about life around volcanic vents via Antarctic Survey.
+
5:32 AM | A Last Gasp for Coal Mining In Washington
  John Henry 1 coal mine and processing in Black DiamondCoal mining came to an end in Washington State with the closure of the Centralia Coal Mine in 2006. The John Henry 1 Mine in aptly named Black Diamond has not operated since 1997 but has recently applied to reopen and in the process finish some reclamation. The Environmental Assessment (JHM_EA.pdf) is currently in the public comment period. The John Henry 1 Mine has a contract to supply coal for concrete production to a […]
+
3:48 AM | My TEDx Talk: We Are Perfect, With a Hefty Asterisk
I propose a shift in goals from numbers to traits that can help us shape a "good" Anthropocene.
+
1:00 AM | MagLab Science Cafe: Extreme Weather Meteorologist Jeff Evans of...
MagLab Science Cafe: Extreme Weather Meteorologist Jeff Evans of the National Weather Service on extreme weather at the MagLab’s Science Cafe in March 2014. Duration: 01:04:38 via MagLab.

April 12, 2014

+
5:53 PM | Geo 730: April 12, Day 468: Motion Blur
Not the best photo, but that's one of the risks of drive-by geology. It appears that this slump started slowly, and that maintenance crews initially didn't realize the entire base was mobile. You can see the attempts to patch the cracks in the old road surface, now completely torn asunder.Photo unmodified. July 10, 2012. FlashEarth location.

April 11, 2014

+
8:29 PM | Unstirring the Himalayan Pot of Mashed Mountains
New work shows how the highest mountain range in the world is not so much a tectonic train wreck as a shuffled pile of crumbly crustal dominoes.
+
7:28 PM | Every devil I meet becomes a friend of mine
It’s not the Devil’s land, you know it’s not that kind Every devil I meet becomes a friend of mine Every devil I meet is an angel in disguise —”Jonas and Ezekiel“, The Indigo Girls The American West is rife with hellish nomenclature. Settlers pushing west from the organized United States into the Plains and […]
12345
142 Results