Posts

April 14, 2015

+
4:48 PM | Global Temperature Rise and Human Health - How is the World Coping?
Global temperatures have been on the rise since the Industrial Age due to human activity such as the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel burning, large-scale deforestation, expansion of urban areas where vegetation cover is replaced by artificial heat retaining materials such as asphalt and concrete, some agricultural practices, and waste management activities. Data from the National Climatic Data Centre that  maintains the world's largest climate data archive indicate that the […]

Madrigano, J., Ito, K., Johnson, S., Kinney, P. & Matte, T. (2015). A Case-Only Study of Vulnerability to Heat Wave–Related Mortality in New York City (2000–2011), Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1408178

Kim, C., Lim, Y., Woodward, A. & Kim, H. (2015). Heat-Attributable Deaths between 1992 and 2009 in Seoul, South Korea, PLOS ONE, 10 (2) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118577

Bobb, J., Peng, R., Bell, M. & Dominici, F. (2014). Heat-Related Mortality and Adaptation to Heat in the United States, Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1307392

Citation
+
4:48 PM | Global Temperature Rise and Human Health - How is the World Coping?
Global temperatures have been on the rise since the Industrial Age due to human activity such as the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel burning, large-scale deforestation, expansion of urban areas where vegetation cover is replaced by artificial heat retaining materials such as asphalt and concrete, some agricultural practices, and waste management activities. Data from the National Climatic Data Centre that  maintains the world's largest climate data archive indicate that the […]

Madrigano, J., Ito, K., Johnson, S., Kinney, P. & Matte, T. (2015). A Case-Only Study of Vulnerability to Heat Wave–Related Mortality in New York City (2000–2011), Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1408178

Kim, C., Lim, Y., Woodward, A. & Kim, H. (2015). Heat-Attributable Deaths between 1992 and 2009 in Seoul, South Korea, PLOS ONE, 10 (2) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118577

Bobb, J., Peng, R., Bell, M. & Dominici, F. (2014). Heat-Related Mortality and Adaptation to Heat in the United States, Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1307392

Citation
+
4:48 PM | Global Temperature Rise and Human Health - How is the World Coping?
Global temperatures have been on the rise since the Industrial Age due to human activity such as the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel burning, large-scale deforestation, expansion of urban areas where vegetation cover is replaced by artificial heat retaining materials such as asphalt and concrete, some agricultural practices, and waste management activities. Data from the National Climatic Data Centre that  maintains the world's largest climate data archive indicate that the […]

Madrigano, J., Ito, K., Johnson, S., Kinney, P. & Matte, T. (2015). A Case-Only Study of Vulnerability to Heat Wave–Related Mortality in New York City (2000–2011), Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1408178

Kim, C., Lim, Y., Woodward, A. & Kim, H. (2015). Heat-Attributable Deaths between 1992 and 2009 in Seoul, South Korea, PLOS ONE, 10 (2) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118577

Bobb, J., Peng, R., Bell, M. & Dominici, F. (2014). Heat-Related Mortality and Adaptation to Heat in the United States, Environmental Health Perspectives, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1307392

Citation
+
3:35 PM | As HIV investigators continue the campaign to control and...
As HIV investigators continue the campaign to control and conceivably eradicate HIV worldwide, certain strategies reflecting myths or misconceptions about this infectious disease have been embraced, while other concepts with merit have been left relatively unexplored. The issues include: a focus on individuals who have warded off the disease and even infection the primary emphasis on adaptive immunity and not also innate immunity; the specific antiviral role of CD8+ cells; the […]

April 13, 2015

+
9:48 PM | Evidence supports rotavirus vaccine effectiveness – vaccines save lives
The Skeptical Raptor, stalking pseudoscience in the internet jungle. The CDC recently published robust evidence that supports rotavirus vaccine effectiveness. There is nothing more powerful than epidemiological studies that show a correlation (and causality) between the drop in the incidence of a vaccine preventable disease immediately after wide introduction of a the vaccine itself in a relatively closed population. What is rotavirus? According to the … Continue reading Evidence […]

April 12, 2015

+
8:47 PM | The science of the HIV virus – how it evolved into what we know it as today
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus (genus of viruses of the Retroviridae family, characterised by a long incubation period) that can cause acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).  HIV is easily spread through infected bodily fluids such as semen, blood and breast milk. If someone is diagnosed as HIV positive, the HIV virus is in […]
+
6:51 PM | The Tobacco debate…
Originally posted on Balu's musings:An important but unheard voice died a few days ago. While Sunita Tomar’s death did not go unnoticed, other more powerful voices with the vested interest of protecting the tobacco industry will probably silence her voice. Sunita was a 28-year-old mother of two who died due to oral cancer.…
+
6:43 PM | @olzhu like I said, I don’t think shared prenatal environment is...
@olzhu like I said, I don’t think shared prenatal environment is even the biggest issue. Shared environment up to 11 years old is much more significant, especially for something as socially constructed as political standing. Check out the paper (open access preprint here). There are plenty of confounding biological factors to choose from though, see for example this table (van Dongen 2012): That paper pushed for ‘the continuing value of twin studies in the omics […]

April 09, 2015

+
7:20 PM | Cancer rates are increasing in the USA–another myth debunked
The Skeptical Raptor, stalking pseudoscience in the internet jungle. Updated 9 April 2015. One of the enduring zombie tropes of the junk science world is that cancer rates are increasing in the USA (and across the world), and that deaths from cancers are higher today than it was in the past. Depending on the one screaming this myth, this rate of cancer increase is a result … Continue reading Cancer rates are increasing in the USA–another myth debunked →Continue […]
+
7:06 PM | Do you have the genes of a rapist?
Rape, it’s so taboo that victims are sometimes shamed for “letting” it happening. It’s a dirty word, no one likes the word rape so we come up with other names for it — sexual assault for example. Well new research shows that close relatives of men convicted of sexual offences commit similar offences themselves more frequently […]

Langstrom, N., Babchishin, K., Fazel, S., Lichtenstein, P. & Frisell, T. (2015). Sexual offending runs in families: A 37-year nationwide study, International Journal of Epidemiology, DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyv029

Citation
+
4:20 PM | How Does A Guinea Worm Reproduce? HORRIBLY and INSIDE YOU.
"Gross Science" is a new science show from PBS Digital Studios that's all about what show host Anna Rothschild calls science's "slimy, smelly, creepy underbelly." In this episode, Rothschild describes the utterly repulsive (but fascinating – really!) life cycle of the Guinea worm.Read more...

April 07, 2015

+
3:27 PM | An ‘apple a day’ keeps the prescription medications away?
  Last week, a research article titled “Association between apple consumption and physician visits: appealing the conventional wisdom than an apple a day keeps the doctor away” was published online in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. A great premise for … Continue reading »The post An ‘apple a day’ keeps the prescription medications away? appeared first on Public Health.
+
3:27 PM | An ‘apple a day’ keeps the prescription medications away?
  Last week, a research article titled “Association between apple consumption and physician visits: appealing the conventional wisdom than an apple a day keeps the doctor away” was published online in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. A great premise for … Continue reading »The post An ‘apple a day’ keeps the prescription medications away? appeared first on Public Health.
+
1:43 AM | I believe the epidemiologists: Boise restaurant linked to Salmonella cases
Last week I spent some time with an old friend who owns a funeral home. Fifteen years ago we spent our time and extra money in the local pub drinking pints and talking trash. As we’ve gotten older our taste has changed; we … Continue reading →

April 06, 2015

+
10:20 PM | Check out Germination, A New Blog On 'Diseases, Drugs, Farms, and Food'
The supremely talented Maryn McKenna – who writes on public health, infectious diseases, food policy, and more – has some new digs over at National Geographic. Her new blog, which launched last Thursday, is called Germination, and is well worth adding to your feed reader of choice.Read more...

March 31, 2015

+
10:44 AM | African-Americans Receive Heart Transplants at Hospitals With Poor Performance Track Records
About five million people in the US suffer from heart failure, and approximately half of them die within five years of being diagnosed. Only about 2,500 people a year receive a heart transplant – the treatment of last resort. A new heart can be life-saving, but it is also life-changing. Even under the best conditions, the surgery is complex, and recovery carries a heavy physical and emotional burden. And not all heart transplant recipients fare equally well after the surgery.... Read more

Kilic, A., Higgins, R., Whitson, B. & Kilic, A. (2015). Racial Disparities in Outcomes of Adult Heart Transplantation, Circulation, 131 (10) 882-889. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.011676

Citation
+
10:44 AM | African-Americans Receive Heart Transplants at Hospitals With Poor Performance Track Records
About five million people in the US suffer from heart failure, and approximately half of them die within five years of being diagnosed. Only about 2,500 people a year receive a heart transplant – the treatment of last resort. A new heart can be life-saving, but it is also life-changing. Even under the best conditions, the surgery is complex, and recovery carries a heavy physical and emotional burden. And not all heart transplant recipients fare equally well after the surgery.... Read more

Kilic, A., Higgins, R., Whitson, B. & Kilic, A. (2015). Racial Disparities in Outcomes of Adult Heart Transplantation, Circulation, 131 (10) 882-889. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.011676

Citation

March 30, 2015

+
1:30 PM | Games That Teach You Something About Public Health
Reading is great, but sometimes it’s more fun to learn by playing. Here are a few games that will end up teaching you something about public health: Spent: This game is for anybody who feels like they know how they … Continue reading »The post Games That Teach You Something About Public Health appeared first on Public Health.

March 29, 2015

+
4:27 PM | Plasmodium knowlesi: A New Ancient Malaria Parasite
There are over a hundred different species of the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites in reptiles, birds and mammals. Being so widespread among terrestrial vertebrates, zoonotic transfer of Plasmodium has come at humans from multiple different sources. Plasmodium knowlesi had been known for some time as a parasite of long-tailed macaques but was not considered a significant human … Continue reading Plasmodium knowlesi: A New Ancient Malaria Parasite →

March 26, 2015

+
8:24 AM | Problems public health investigators face: It’s a tough job (but we love ya for it)
In Ontario, Canada (that’s in Canada), enteric case investigators perform a number of functions when conducting telephone interviews including providing health education, collecting data for regulatory purposes ultimately to prevent further illness, enforcement, illness source attribution and outbreak detection. Information … Continue reading →

March 21, 2015

+
8:12 PM | Paris Is Halving the Number of Cars on the Road to Battle A Recent Spike In Pollution
For the past few days, the Eiffel Tower has been shrouded in a smoky haze. That’s because the city of Paris has experiencing a sharp rise in air pollution, even topping the world air pollution charts for a brief period earlier this week. Now, Paris is taking drastic measures to combat the smog spike. On Saturday (3/21), the office of Mayor Anne Hidalgo announced that Paris would be cutting the number of cars on the road in half beginning next week. On Monday,
1
21 Results