Posts

September 17, 2014

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4:22 PM | Can the U.S. and China Find Harmony in Pursuing Climate Progress?
A close look at the intensifying dance between the United States and China over how to cut greenhouse gas emissions.
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4:21 PM | Anthony Watts Starts Up Cloud Based Anti-Science Organization
The Open Atmospheric Society Climate science pseudo-skeptic Anthony Watts recently bought and registered the domain “theoas.org” and has just announced the formation at that Internet address of a new society explicitly designed to organize people in meteorology and related areas intent on opposing the scientific consensus on climate change. And yes, there is a scientific…
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3:34 PM | What Everyone Should Know About Climate Change
Climate scientist William D’Andrea of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory asked young scientists attending a symposium last October, "What do you wish everyone knew about climate change?" He turned the responses into this video, which covers the topic pretty well.
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2:00 PM | Seeking Earth-Like Alien Worlds in the 'Venus Zone'
Exoplanet hunters have just made it easier to identify alien Venuses, in the hopes that doing so will lead to the discovery of more alien Earths.
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7:27 AM | RCPs, SSPs, SPAs, …. what????
At the latest with the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) a number of new acronyms started spilling out of the climate change research community to policy makers and the broader interested public. Centrally among them are RCPs, SSPs and SPAs, meaning Representative Concentration Pathways, Shared Socio-economic Pathways and […]
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7:27 AM | RCPs, SSPs, SPAs, …. what????
At the latest with the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) a number of new acronyms started spilling out of the climate change research community to policy makers and the broader interested public. Centrally among them are RCPs, SSPs and SPAs, meaning Representative Concentration Pathways, Shared Socio-economic Pathways and […]
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3:03 AM | AskDrMann! PennFuture’s 9/17 Twitter chat with climate scientist Michael Mann (@MichaelEMann )
Check this out: PennFuture is hosting a Twitter chat with renowned Penn State climate scientist (and our good friend!) Michael Mann aka @MichaelEMann on Wednesday, September 17, from 2pm-3pm EDT. Use the hashtag #AskDrMann to participate. You won’t wanna miss it! Mann has been at the forefront of the climate change conversation over the past…

September 16, 2014

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8:53 PM | This Rare White Possum Could Soon Be a Ghostly Memory
A ghost lives in the Daintree Rainforest in northeastern Queensland, Australia. There, on a single mountain range located 1,100 meters above sea level, scientists have recently found what may be the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:39 PM | Fore! Critically Endangered Bat Hits the Putting Green...
By Susan Cosier The Miami Bat Squad (not the Vice squad, though we wish) just found what could be the first known roost of the critically endangered Florida bonneted bat in decades. The bat is one of the rarest mammals in the world, and scientists don’t know much about them—except that only a few hundred remain, thanks to pesticides and habitat destruction (a.k.a. development). But without swampy forests and wetlands, these mysterious night […]
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1:10 PM | Good news on ozone layer should spur climate action
For the first time since 1980, the ozone layer that shields us from harmful radiation is repairing itself after being eaten away over decades by human-produced chemicals. The good news comes just in time to celebrate...

September 15, 2014

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9:41 PM | September 14, 2014: Wiring an African Wilderness, Starting a Garbage-Fueled Country and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they discover a well-dressed Italian mummy, proclaim a nation devoted to garbage, find the perfect island, find new ways to survive cancer, explore the Okavango Delta for science, relate to a solitary blue whale, celebrate the Wilderness Act, and create a canine soup.
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9:20 PM | Texas Is About to Adopt Textbooks That Lie About Climate Change
The Texas State Board of Education meets this week to discuss the adoption of controversial science textbooks that are deeply misleading about climate change. Now, two groups are working to prevent Texas kids from learning junk science.Read more...
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5:30 PM | California Is the Warmest It's Ever Been
The state is seeing a state-wide drought and its hottest year since record-keeping began.
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5:24 PM | Join the Earth Institute for Climate Week NYC
From heads of state to ordinary citizens, thousands of people will gather for more than 100 events during Climate Week NYC. They’ll be talking and debating the rights of nature, corporate leadership, the threat from rising seas, innovations for social good and innumerable other topics. The Earth Institute and its centers will be engaged in several events.
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4:49 PM | To Keep Moving is To Live
We’ve all seen the scenario in our high school biology textbooks. A single population of fish shares a large Pond. But then something drastic happens in the landscape. Perhaps a drought occurs, and the large Pond partially dries up to leave two smaller ponds separated from each other by a hill or expanse of higher, dry land. If this separation lasts long enough, combining the fish from pond A and pond B produces an interesting effect – the fish can... Read more
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4:49 PM | To Keep Moving is To Live
We’ve all seen the scenario in our high school biology textbooks. A single population of fish shares a large Pond. But then something drastic happens in the landscape. Perhaps a drought occurs, and the large Pond partially dries up to leave two smaller ponds separated from each other by a hill or expanse of higher, dry land. If this separation lasts long enough, combining the fish from pond A and pond B produces an interesting effect – the fish can... Read more
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4:49 PM | To Keep Moving is To Live
We’ve all seen the scenario in our high school biology textbooks. A single population of fish shares a large Pond. But then something drastic happens in the landscape. Perhaps a drought occurs, and the large Pond partially dries up to leave two smaller ponds separated from each other by a hill or expanse of higher, dry land. If this separation lasts long enough, combining the fish from pond A and pond B produces an interesting effect – the fish can... Read more
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4:33 PM | 117 Million Lakes Found in Latest World Count
Using satellite photos and computerized mapping technologies, an international research team counted all of the lakes on Earth. They found about 117 million lakes, covering almost four percent of the world’s land surface, not counting the glaciers on Greenland and Antarctica, according to a new study. It is the first time the world’s lakes have been…
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4:03 PM | Warmest August on Record, Global Warming Continues
According to data just updated by NASA, last August was the warmest August for the entire instrumental data record, which begins in 1881. This has been something of a mixed year but overall warm. Of the 134 years for which there are data, the coolest month this year so far was February, at 17th place,…
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12:22 PM | Hōkūle’a: Enjoying a Day Off
Getting days off is a rarity on the Worldwide Voyage. When we get the opportunity to plan an excursion, we try to make the most of it! This was how some crew members spent our day off after the UN Conference in Samoa.
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7:01 AM | Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California
California water districts are eyeing a potential new source of water: trees. After a century of fire suppression, Sierra Nevada forests are more dense than ever before. And those pine trees are taking up a lot of water that might otherwise run off into California rivers.
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12:03 AM | Environmental Earth Science News Roundup #1
Anne is teaching Environmental Earth Science this fall. Because environmental earth science is pervasive in our lives, it’s also a frequent topic of news coverage. In order to encourage students to pay attention to where environmental earth science pops up … Continue reading →

September 13, 2014

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10:32 PM | Vulnerability of biodiversity hotspots to invasive species and climate change
Cclose monitoring is now required to evaluate the biodiversity responses to invasive species and climate change and to test this study projections against observations. Continue reading →
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2:03 PM | Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?
The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…
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2:03 PM | Political and Weather Climates are Changing, But at What Speed?
The weather in Washington, D.C. finally turned hot in September, just in time for Congress to resume. We enjoyed an unusually moderate summer this year, with many days topping out in the high seventies or low eighties. Plenty of sun. San Diego weather, you might say. Before September, we were missing about two full weeks…
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12:00 PM | “Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?
"So I was wrong," scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.
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12:00 PM | “Extinct” Snail Found Alive—But for How Long?
"So I was wrong," scientist says about extinction—but cautions the purple-and-pink mollusk is still perilously close to dying out.
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12:11 AM | Judith Curry Scores Own Goal in Climate Hockey
Did you ever read a textbook on economic history, or an in-depth article on the relative value of goods over the centuries expressed in current US dollars? Have you ever encountered a graphic that shows long term trends in rainfall patterns or other climate variables, using a couple of simple lines, designed to give a…

September 12, 2014

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6:59 PM | Saving a Sea of Strange
By Jason Bittel Coral is weird stuff. Reefs can stretch for miles, but the actual animal (yes, coral’s an animal) is pretty tiny—a single polyp attaching itself to other polyps to form massive undersea ecosystems. Coral have tentacles, mouths, and exoskeletons. Some look like fans. Some look like trees. Others look like brains. And they range from the rock-hard to the soft and slimy. But many of the 6,000-plus coral species have at least one […]

September 11, 2014

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7:26 PM | U.N. Report: Carbon Dioxide Levels at Record Highs
The concentration and the rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere are spiking, according to new analysis from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Scientists believe the record levels are not only the result of emissions but also of plants and oceans’ inability to absorb the excess amounts of CO2. “We know without any doubt that our climate…
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