Posts

October 31, 2014

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1:04 AM | Welcome, Beavers
Beavers "welcomed into the landscape as defense against withering effects of a warmer drier climate" http://t.co/GZAOxs4oex #climatechange— Barbara J King (@bjkingape) October 28, 2014 "Beavers have evolved to respond to the sound of running water by trying to stop it, because their survival depends on a full pond. (A Yellowstone National Park biologist reported that when he briefly kept a beaver in his basement with plans to reintroduce it to a local stream, it kept frantically clawing […]

October 30, 2014

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7:52 PM | EPA Refines Pollution Rules
Last week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was told by a federal appeals court that it could move forward with implementing a program to curb air pollution that crosses state lines. The Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CASPR) would require 28 states to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide by power plants.…
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5:49 PM | US Solar Costs Catching Up to Conventional Energy
The cost of solar power is on the verge of catching up with conventional electricity, report two new studies. Continue reading →
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1:01 PM | Rare American warbler surprises scientists by adapting, thriving in a new ecosystem
When Gary Graves cranks up his boom box and drives remote back roads through pine plantations in Texas, Louisiana and other southern states, a few […] The post Rare American warbler surprises scientists by adapting, thriving in a new ecosystem appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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10:30 AM | Climate change and human health
by Kasra Hassani Health, Medicine & Veterinary Sciences editor *Updated (30 Oct, 2.30PM PST) to add link to PHAC’s Annual Report. Climate change is not a matter of the future: it is happening now, impacting the environment and all of us who rely on it. However, fighting climate change is not just about reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Even if all CO2-emitting engines, factories, and power plants worldwide were to stop working today, climate change effects would persist for an […]

October 29, 2014

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6:30 PM | Hydropower May Be Huge Source of Methane Emissions
What if reservoirs that store water and produce electricity were among some of the world's largest contributors of greenhouse gasses?
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3:45 PM | Is the GOP Energy Committee Chair Going Down in Michigan’s 6th?
Fred Upton is the incumbent Republican Congressional Representative for southwest Michigan’s 6th district. Upton is considered to be one of Michigan’s most powerful Republicans. He is the Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, which is an important position in relation to climate change. He has been in the House since being elected in…
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10:30 AM | Thinking about water
by Dan Kraus Guest post from the Nature Conservancy of Canada Here in Canada, it’s a luxury to not think about water. Most of us watch it come out of the tap and go down the drain without considering its source or destination. Many people in the world don’t have taps or drains; over 1.2 billion people experience critical water shortages. They think about water every day. Climate change requires that Canadians change how we think about water. It has weather and water scientists […]

October 28, 2014

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8:26 PM | Cold winters tied to drop in Arctic sea ice
But only in Asia. And by the end of the century, warming will dominate.
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6:50 PM | Bird-friendly coffee plantations are mammal friendly as well, study shows
Scientists have long known that in the tropics shade-grown coffee plantations provide critical habitat for migratory and resident birds. Now a new survey conducted in […] The post Bird-friendly coffee plantations are mammal friendly as well, study shows appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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6:16 PM | Banging the Drum on Science When It Fits Your Tune
In her last big superlative GMO story, New York Times reporter Amy Harmon wrote: Scientists, who have come to rely on liberals in political battles over stem-cell research, climate change and the teaching of evolution, have been dismayed to find themselves at odds with their traditional allies on this issue. Some compare the hostility to G.M.O.s […]The post Banging the Drum on Science When It Fits Your Tune appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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5:45 PM | Australia's Plan Won't Save Great Barrier Reef: Scientists
The government's plans to protect the Great Barrier Reef can't prevent its decline, the country's pre-eminent grouping of natural scientists said Tuesday.
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5:22 PM | Corporations Should Mean What They Say on Sustainability
Nowadays, it seems like every big company promotes an image of sustainability. A common example is the now-ubiquitous hotel-bathroom notice invoking images of ocean animals or pastoral scenery in an... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:53 PM | An Interview on Climate Change for Mobile Journalism 4 on Sound Cloud
This was technically difficult owing to internet conditions but interviewer Vijay Kishore Vaidyanathan did a great job with what he had. In particular he did a great job editing out the constant explosions in the background!
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10:30 AM | IPCC reports: between the street and the policy-makers
by Pascal Lapointe & Karine Morin Science Policy subject editors In September, the people’s climate march became New York City’s biggest political event in recent times. Why the need for a “people’s” march in the first place? Because of a feeling that something is wrong, not only in policy circles, but also in environmental circles – including the IPCC reports. Bill McKibben, the man behind the recent 350.org movement and catalyst of this march, has […]

October 27, 2014

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11:06 PM | October 26, 2014: Give a Turtle CPR, Climb Yosemite’s Most Iconic Peaks, and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb all of the world's tallest mountains, write travel stories, pack for a purpose, give a turtle CPR, set records in the Yosemite Valley, find early humans where you don't expect to, map the Earth, the oceans and Mars, and harvest GMOs.
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10:33 PM | There is something about those climate records that keep getting broken
I think we have all become used to headlines like this - Earth Just Had Its Hottest September On Record. It’s all ho-hum to us. We just don’t notice any more – we don’t bother reading the articles. This is the point … Continue reading →
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10:33 PM | There is something about those climate records that keep getting broken
I think we have all become used to headlines like this - Earth Just Had Its Hottest September On Record. It’s all ho-hum to us. We just don’t notice any more – we don’t bother reading the articles. This is the point … Continue reading →
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10:00 PM | Droughts and fish highways
"I grew up on the shores of Connecticut looking into tidal pools and wondering about the plants and animals living there: where they move to when the tide goes out, and from when the tide comes in, and why. Once I even tracked my cat out my 3rd floor window and onto the roof to see how she accessed my bedroom at night. So I’ve always been curious about movement patterns in nature. The whys and hows of nature are... Read more
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10:00 PM | Droughts and fish highways
"I grew up on the shores of Connecticut looking into tidal pools and wondering about the plants and animals living there: where they move to when the tide goes out, and from when the tide comes in, and why. Once I even tracked my cat out my 3rd floor window and onto the roof to see how she accessed my bedroom at night. So I’ve always been curious about movement patterns in nature. The whys and hows of nature are... Read more
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8:39 PM | Butterfly Indicators of Ecosystem Change
As more researchers begin studying butterflies, the links to other species and whole ecosystems will become clearer and will help guide nature conservation plans and policies. Continue reading →
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4:30 PM | Cold Winters in Europe, Asia Linked to Sea Ice Decline
Arctic sea ice decline has doubled the chances of an extreme cold winter over Europe and Asia.
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4:00 PM | Hydrometeorology and ecophysiology of cloud forests
The links between hydrometeorological conditions and vegetation distribution, functioning and survival.
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4:00 PM | Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate
Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater opens her arms to all who would learn. The plinth on which she rests sends a different message -- clues to one possible method of carbon sequestration, which could prove to be a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

October 26, 2014

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10:13 PM | Feds launch ocean biodiversity monitoring network
Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:A pelican perches along the coast in Englewood, Florida. Florida, California and Alaska sites will host pilot phase of research effort Staff Report FRISCO — Federal agencies are launching an ambitious $17 million…
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12:49 AM | Putting politicans in their place on climate change
The US is a strange country. It has some great comedians (and some great scientists) but it also has some lousy politicians. It’s a real mystery to me how the US House Committee on Science, Space and Technology can have … Continue reading →
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12:49 AM | Putting politicans in their place on climate change
The US is a strange country. It has some great comedians (and some great scientists) but it also has some lousy politicians. It’s a real mystery to me how the US House Committee on Science, Space and Technology can have … Continue reading →

October 25, 2014

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9:18 PM | Wooster Geologists return to the Cedar Creek Bog and Excavation Site
WOOSTER, OHIO–Greg Wiles and I got to experience a bit of field archaeology today at the Cedar Creek Mastodon excavation site. Greg’s Climate change class has visited the site and its associated bog twice this semester: once to do some soil probing and exploration, and then again to extract a core from the bog. This […]

October 24, 2014

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11:52 PM | Saying Good-bye to the Glaciers of Glacier National Park
The view north from Logan Pass in Glacier National ParkMake no mistake about it. Glacier National Park is one of the most spectacular parks in the United States, and indeed is one of my favorite places on planet Earth. That said, it's losing something important, and the change is profound.How many animals are in this picture?When I was a child, I loved museums, but I knew there was a big difference between seeing a stuffed animal in a quiet exhibit hall versus seeing one in the wild. A living, […]
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7:55 PM | Hair Bands and Giant Trousers: A Lesson in How Little I Know About Bees
This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Clay Bolt, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. www.claybolt.com / www.beautifulbees.org For months I have been…
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