Posts

October 30, 2014

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6:07 PM | Living With Cancer: Not Talking About Medical Mistakes
Doctors make mistakes, but they don't like to talk about them, writes Susan Gubar, who suffered from medical mistakes made during surgery to remove ovarian cancer.
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4:56 PM | Cancer series part II: Targeted therapy
When I first studied cancer medicine as an undergraduate, my lecturer described chemotherapy as “beating up the patient with a baseball bat in the hope that you get the cancer on the way.” Chemotherapy has benefits, but the side effects can be traumatic. These side effects arise because of what we pharmacologists call “off-target toxicity,” […] The post Cancer series part II: Targeted therapy appeared first on HeadStuff.
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2:44 PM | Peritoneal Carcinosis and HIPEC: A second chance for patients, thanks to animal research
When we hear the phrase ‘animal research’ we tend to think about the development of new drugs for the clinical practice, or studying molecular pathways involved in the progression of disease; but we must also remember that the techniques used … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Public health agencies should prioritize public health based on evidence, not fear
The Editorial: The complexity of health requires an expansion of the areas covered by public health agencies Ed note: This post comes to us from our PLOS Blogs friend Dr Travis Saunders. Travis Saunders has a PhD in Human Kinetics … Continue reading »The post Public health agencies should prioritize public health based on evidence, not fear appeared first on Public Health.
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12:00 PM | Public health agencies should prioritize public health based on evidence, not fear
The Editorial: The complexity of health requires an expansion of the areas covered by public health agencies Ed note: This post comes to us from our PLOS Blogs friend Dr Travis Saunders. Travis Saunders has a PhD in Human Kinetics … Continue reading »The post Public health agencies should prioritize public health based on evidence, not fear appeared first on Public Health.
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7:50 AM | R.I.P., McKenzie Lowe. Stanislaw Burzynski failed you.
R.I.P., McKenzie Lowe. Unfortunately, Stanislaw Burzynski was no more able to save you than anyone else, his claims of great success treating pediatric brain tumors notwithstanding: HUDSON — Thirteen-year-old Hudson resident McKenzie Lowe died Friday evening after a 2-year-battle against an aggressive and inoperable brain stem tumor. McKenzie died at 10:27 p.m. in her own…
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7:50 AM | R.I.P., McKenzie Lowe. Stanislaw Burzynski failed you.
R.I.P., McKenzie Lowe. Unfortunately, Stanislaw Burzynski was no more able to save you than anyone else, his claims of great success treating pediatric brain tumors notwithstanding: HUDSON — Thirteen-year-old Hudson resident McKenzie Lowe died Friday evening after a 2-year-battle against an aggressive and inoperable brain stem tumor. McKenzie died at 10:27 p.m. in her own…
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5:00 AM | “Quackery: A $10 Billion Scandal”
Who would you guess authored a 250-page report which begins with this Preface? This report marks the culmination of an intensive four-year review of quackery and its impact on the elderly. . . As this report details, quackery has traveled far from the day of the pitchman and covered wagon to emerge as big business. […]

October 29, 2014

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7:11 PM | Knowing Cancer Risk May Not Affect Screening Rates
Telling people of their potential increased risk of colon cancer did not spur them to get the recommended screening.
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4:13 PM | Cancer series part 1: The history of chemotherapy
“Gas! Gas!….flound’ring like a man in fire or lime… guttering, choking, drowning… blood come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs.” Few things evoke the horror of battle as powerfully as Wilfred Owens’ Dulce et Decorum Est. Even though the phrase, “war on cancer” has entered common parlance, few of us realize that one of the first […] The post Cancer series part 1: The history of chemotherapy appeared first on HeadStuff.
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11:28 AM | Barcelona BioMed Conference: Drosophila as a model in cancer (15 Jun 2015 to 17 Jun 2015)
Barcelona BioMed Conference: Drosophila as a model in cancer 15 - 17 Jun 2015 Cancer is a multi-hit process involving mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, as well as interactions between the tumour cells and the surrounding normal tissue. The fruit fly, Drosophila, is an excellent, genetically-tractable system for modelling the development of cancer, due to the […]

October 28, 2014

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2:00 PM | Ebola, “right-to-try,” and placebo legislation
One of the biggest medical conspiracy theories for a long time has been that there exist out there all sorts of fantastic cures for cancer and other deadly diseases but that you can’t have them because (1) “they” don’t want you to know about them (as I like to call it, the Kevin Trudeau approach)…
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2:00 PM | Ebola, “right-to-try,” and placebo legislation
One of the biggest medical conspiracy theories for a long time has been that there exist out there all sorts of fantastic cures for cancer and other deadly diseases but that you can’t have them because (1) “they” don’t want you to know about them (as I like to call it, the Kevin Trudeau approach)…
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4:25 AM | Faces of Breast Cancer: Find Your Story, Join the Conversation
An enhanced interactive feature allows readers to join a global community of women and men whose lives have been touched by breast cancer. Share your story, find someone like you or join the conversation at the Faces of Breast Cancer project.
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12:11 AM | Leveraging the immune system to fight cancer – Biotech’s...
Leveraging the immune system to fight cancer – Biotech’s future Inventors are using small-scale biology and engineering to find ways to use the body’s natural defenses to effectively treat cancer. NSF-funded small business GigaGen uses microfluidics, bioinformatics and genome sequencing to look for antibodies that may be good candidates for new therapies. GigaGen’s David Johnson explained how at the 2014 BIO International Convention. By: National Science Foundation.

October 27, 2014

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11:20 PM | This Town Did Halloween A Week Early for A 4-Year-Old With Leukemia (Video)
For four-year-old Ethan van Leuven, every new day is a blessing. At 22 months old, Ethan was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a form of bone-marrow cancer most common in children between the ages of two and five. After years of exhaustive treatment, Ethan’s doctors informed the family that his battle will likely soon be over. “His Leukemia has gone out of control and is no longer treatable, so he was given a few days to several weeks left,” said […]
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9:54 PM | Join us for the second cancer center open house – November 6
Sanford-Burnham’s NCI-Designated Cancer Center and the Cancer Center’s Community Advisory Board will host the second annual Cancer Center open house for cancer survivors, their families and friends, and research advocates on November 6 at 4:30 p.m. in La Jolla, Calif. The open house, titled “The Science Behind Melanoma,” will focus on revealing the latest discoveriesRead More
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9:54 PM | Join us for the second cancer center open house – November 6
Sanford-Burnham’s NCI-Designated Cancer Center and the Cancer Center’s Community Advisory Board will host the second annual Cancer Center open house for cancer survivors, their families and friends, and research advocates on November 6 at 4:30 p.m. in La Jolla, Calif. The open house, titled “The Science Behind Melanoma,” will focus on revealing the latest discoveriesRead More
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9:55 AM | Wellcome Trust Research Round-Up: 27.10.14
Our fortnightly round-up of research news from the Wellcome Trust community… Treating diabetes with light-activated drugs A new method of treating type 2 diabetes has been developed by researchers at Imperial College London and LMU Munich. They have adapted currently used drugs so that they can be selectively activated using blue light. The hope is […]
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2:36 AM | Public Health in the News – October 26, 2014
Global The latest Ebola updates: As you have probably heard by now, a doctor in New York is now battling a case of Ebola. They have been treating him by giving him a blood transfusion donated by someone who survived … Continue reading →

October 26, 2014

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3:30 AM | Stem cells, branching processes and stochasticity in cancer
When you were born, you probably had 270 bones in your body. Unless you’ve experienced some very drastic traumas, and assuming that you are fully grown, then you probably have 206 bones now. Much like the number and types of internal organs, we can call this question of science solved. Unfortunately, it isn’t always helpful […]

Traulsen, A., Pacheco, J. & Dingli, D. (2010). Reproductive fitness advantage of BCR–ABL expressing leukemia cells, Cancer Letters, 294 (1) 43-48. DOI: 10.1016/j.canlet.2010.01.020

Citation

October 25, 2014

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3:18 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 24/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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3:18 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 24/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

October 24, 2014

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1:24 PM | Right Turn: New StemCellShorts illuminates cancer stem cells
> Just over one year ago, we launched the pilot phase of an animation project titled StemCellShorts here on Signals blog. Funded by a Stem Cell Network Public Outreach Award, the project was very much an experiment for us to see what would happen when you tasked a team of talented creatives, expert faculty and...Read more

October 22, 2014

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6:00 PM | Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
The drug, developed with the help of Yusuke Nakamura and his lab, inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types, including lung and breast.
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5:20 PM | Breakthrough: Scientists Use Sound To Breach The Blood-Brain Barrier
For the first time ever in humans, neuroscientists have penetrated the stubborn barrier that protects the brain from toxins in the bloodstream. The breakthrough means that doctors can now deliver drugs to previously inaccessible parts of the brain, making it easier to treat cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Read more...
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9:14 AM | An anonymous Canadian foundation grants $4 million to study “integrative oncology”
Supporters of science-based medicine and keeping pseudoscience out of medicine have a few years to prepare for an onslaught of crappy studies “proving” the value of “integrative” oncology. No doubt at this point you’re wondering just what the heck Orac is talking about. I will tell you. It involves an institution we’ve encountered before and…

October 21, 2014

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5:10 PM | Aren’t Cancer Cells the Worst?
I try to find humor in some unfunny places, but I was never sure how to approach cancer. I first did a comic about cancer genes for my book What’s in Your Genes?, which seems to find the happy... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:42 PM | HPV and HepB vaccines are not associated with multiple sclerosis
I didn’t know it was an issue, but apparently there was some concern that there was a small possibility that vaccines, specifically the hepatitis B (HepB) and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, might increase the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) or some other acquired central nervous system demyelinating syndrome (CNS ADS). Apparently, there have been numerous studies […]Continue reading «HPV and HepB vaccines are not associated with multiple sclerosis»
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3:20 AM | Genetic Variant May Shield Latinas From Breast Cancer
A new study’s findings may explain why Hispanic women have lower rates of breast cancer than other Americans.
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