Posts

January 28, 2015

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3:13 PM | An homage to the writing style of Dr. Peter Adler -Or- How to write good science well.
Although I’ve been a graduate student for more than four years, I’ve been a peer-reviewed author for just a few . . .

January 27, 2015

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7:59 PM | A Different View of a Museum
I’ve always loved museums, especially natural history museums, but I’ve never managed to spend as much time wandering through them …Continue reading →
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7:34 AM | Blizzard Juno – Y U COME 2 NYC?
Just as you can’t just call any whisky ‘Scotch’ or any wine ‘Champagne’, you can’t just call any ‘ol storm a blizzard. No, dear reader. The blizzard is the storm all storms aspire to be. Unlike a ‘severe’ storm, a ‘blizzard’ is decidedly hardcore. To earn the official title of ‘blizzard’, a storm must have three things: Severe snow […]

January 25, 2015

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2:53 AM | Creating a Basic Webpage
Ever wanted to learn to code? Well, I did, but never took the time to until now. Today, I, along with other Future Science Leaders students, attended HTML 500, a coding event where 500 people sat together and learned the very basics of how to code. This experience was very hands-on and satisfying, thanks to […]

January 24, 2015

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11:49 PM | One Big Wave, and Millions of Lost Legos
On Feb. 13, 1997, about 20 miles off the coast of England, a massive wave hit the freighter Tokio Express, toppling 62 giant containers into the rough north Atlantic seas. Trapped inside one of them: nearly 5 million Legos. Many floated to the surface. Carried by currents, they’re still being found on beaches around the world […]
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3:36 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 23/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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3:36 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 23/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

January 23, 2015

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4:56 PM | On Beauty in Technical Science Writing
Via Chris Woolston at Nature, I ran across last week’s discussion about the role of beauty in technical scientific prose. Writing over at The Tree of Life, Stephen Heard offers several examples of beauty in scientific writing, and he calls … Continue reading →

January 22, 2015

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11:30 PM | Ask me about my banana
This afternoon I was lucky enough to chat to Peter Griffith, founding director of NASA’s Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office. We were discussing the difficulties of talking abut carbon to the general public. Peter lamented; We were at a conference, in our little booth and I looked around me. Everyone else there, in all the […]
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5:58 PM | Climate Communication: Your Audience & Your Message
Recap of the @AAAS Climate Comm. Workshop - Friday, January 16th 2015 at Georgia Tech in Atlanta
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4:00 PM | Thirsty? Then suck on a stone!
Whilst it is claimed that only the taxman can get blood out of a stone, it seems that some plants can abstract water from stone-like minerals. Arguably, ahead of light, water is the most important abiotic factor that plants need and obtain from the environment. Although water is essential to plant life, it is not […]

January 21, 2015

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5:58 PM | Could Deoxyribonucleic Acid Be in Your Food?
My colleague Arjan, who's much wittier than I am, suggested the label go something like this: Product may contain trace amounts of DNA; DNA has been linked with cancers and other disorders; There is a high probability pregnant mothers will pass DNA to their unborn children Continue reading →
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11:30 AM | Communicate Your Science Video Competition at EGU 2015!
Want to communicate your research to a wider audience and try your hand at video production? Now’s your chance! Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition! The aim is to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public. The winning entry will receive a free registration to the General Assembly in 2016. Your video can include scenes of you out in […]
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11:30 AM | Communicate Your Science Video Competition at EGU 2015!
Want to communicate your research to a wider audience and try your hand at video production? Now’s your chance! Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition! The aim is to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public. The winning entry will receive a free registration to the General Assembly in 2016. Your video can include scenes of you out in […]

January 20, 2015

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10:00 PM | The Kardashian Index: A not so scientific measure
By Kate How might you measure a scientist’s ‘scientific worth’? Today I will cover three indices developed to rank just how effective scientists are! In alphabetical and best to last order. The h-index This index attempts to capture both the … Continue reading →
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6:15 PM | “Why aren’t they listening to us?” The problem of climate change.
I was fortunate enough to write this post from Conway, Arkansas, where today I got to see The Master aka Randy Olson discuss science narrative with the students of Hendrix College. For those of you wondering: Conway is here: At the talk, we learned that Climate Change – the greatest pending catastrophe in the history of the world […]

January 19, 2015

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6:06 PM | The Best and Worst of Times in The Age of Wisdom and Foolishness
This is a guest post by an anonymous science blogger, edited by Paige Brown Jarreau. I’m pretty unremarkable, all things considered. A year ago especially, I was just a guy with a weird twitter chatting about what caught my interest as well as trying to find my niche and audience. At the time, the hashtag “#ThatShirt” probably wouldn't have piqued my interest beyond people posting newspaper articles about it. The ensuing blizzard of opinions came from Dr. Matt Taylor’s […]
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10:00 AM | To tweet or not to tweet?
Here at GARNet, we’re pretty big fans of social media, and Twitter in particular. You can find me, for example @GARNetweets, Charis is @weedinggems, and Ruth has the enviable Twitter handle @plantscience. We regularly post links to news, journal papers, job posts etc., tweet from conferences, and encourage live-tweeting at our own events too. Left[...] The post To tweet or not to tweet? appeared first on Weeding the Gems.
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5:26 AM | The Universality of Facial Expressions: Do You See What I See?
After looking at a quick overview of my past science communication posts, I’ve written about some scientific topics ranging from biology/public health (the West African Ebola epidemic, GMO foods), astronomy (comets), technology (electricity-generating shoes, a guide to circuits) and ecology/environmental science (impending extinction of certain species). However, I realize that I’ve barely written at all […]
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4:06 AM | Why I’m Not a Time Traveller…
(Image from here, licensed under  “Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Germany“) Well, there’s of course the obvious fact that it isn’t remotely possible with today’s technology. But even if some of my more crazy, mad scientist-isque colleagues (cough.. cough… Jesse, Parker) were to one day build a time machine, I would be the first to nope out of climbing into […]

January 18, 2015

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9:21 AM | The Skateboard Reimagined!
I remember the first time I read Diary of a Wimpy Kid, I was in grade 3, had Harry-Potter-glasses, and my hair cut did me no justice. As I read, I remember laughing really hard at this one sketch of an old man shooing children off his lawn who were riding hoverboards. This image was […]

January 17, 2015

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2:14 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 16/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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2:14 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 16/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

January 15, 2015

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10:28 PM | Restrictive Publishing Policies Guiding Self-archival of Articles by Authors are Not Helpful
Publishing policies of scientific journals - especially, the closed-access journals - often leave me scratching my head. Seriously. I am a member of ResearchGate; it is supposed to be a scientist-only social network, perhaps a "Facebook for Science" (as Eli Kintisch wrote in 2014 in Science's Career Magazine), in which scientists can upload and share their research papers, track citations, follow the work of - and even request papers from - colleagues and fellow scientists across the world. […]
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10:28 PM | Restrictive Publishing Policies Guiding Self-archival of Articles by Authors are Not Helpful
Publishing policies of scientific journals - especially, the closed-access journals - often leave me scratching my head. Seriously. I am a member of ResearchGate; it is supposed to be a scientist-only social network, perhaps a "Facebook for Science" (as Eli Kintisch wrote in 2014 in Science's Career Magazine), in which scientists can upload and share their research papers, track citations, follow the work of - and even request papers from - colleagues and fellow scientists across the world. […]
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10:28 PM | Restrictive Publishing Policies Guiding Self-archival of Articles by Authors are Not Helpful
Publishing policies of scientific journals - especially, the closed-access journals - often leave me scratching my head. Seriously. I am a member of ResearchGate; it is supposed to be a scientist-only social network, perhaps a "Facebook for Science" (as Eli Kintisch wrote in 2014 in Science's Career Magazine), in which scientists can upload and share their research papers, track citations, follow the work of - and even request papers from - colleagues and fellow scientists across the world. […]
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4:00 PM | Classical texts re-imagined/re-imaged…
Do you remember the good old days when students read for a degree? Well, I don’t know how much proper reading they do these days – i.e. that which involves actually touching and turning the pages of a book or research article (but which is probably nowadays forbidden on health and safety grounds – well, […]

January 14, 2015

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8:48 PM | Undergraduate Research Highlights from #SICB2015
Happy New Year! I hope you all had a restorative holiday break. I spent nearly two weeks with family and friends and it was glorious. I capped off the break attending the annual meeting Society for... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:25 PM | How Often Do Books Mention Scientists and Researchers?
Here is a graphic showing the usage of the words "scientists", "researchers", "soldiers" in English-language books published in 1900-2008. The graphic was generated using the Google N-gram Viewer which scours all digitized books in the Google database for selected words and assesses the relative word usage frequencies.   (You can click on the chart to see a screen shot or on this link for the N-gram Viewer) It is depressing that soldiers are mentioned more frequently than scientists or […]
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4:25 PM | How Often Do Books Mention Scientists and Researchers?
Here is a graphic showing the usage of the words "scientists", "researchers", "soldiers" in English-language books published in 1900-2008. The graphic was generated using the Google N-gram Viewer which scours all digitized books in the Google database for selected words and assesses the relative word usage frequencies.   (You can click on the chart to see a screen shot or on this link for the N-gram Viewer) It is depressing that soldiers are mentioned more frequently than scientists or […]
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