Posts

September 02, 2014

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3:14 PM | Call to Canadian Science Bloggers: Fill the Media Gap
by Kimberly Moynahan Science in Society subject editor As many of you already know, the Council of Canadian Academies released an assessment last week entitled, “Science Culture: Where Canada Stands.” The report is the result of an in-depth, independent assessment to investigate the state of Canada’s science culture.  It was initiated in 2012 at the request of the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, Industry Canada, and Natural Resources Canada. The […]
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11:00 AM | Speak for yourself
Arguably the most unique ability of humans is the ability to communicate highly complex concepts, for which we need language. But language can mean many things, from sign language to writing, although the most efficient form of language we have is speech – a skill unique today to living modern humans. The apes have a […]

September 01, 2014

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10:00 PM | Meet the scientists…Who? Me?
By Kelly Just recently I was given a healthy reminder that some stereotypes are really hard to break. I am very open about the fact that I was always interested in science, however when I hit 16 I was more … Continue reading →
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9:43 PM | A Shot in the Dark – The Perils of Sharing Vaccine Science
One of Wikipedia’s most interesting articles is simply titled “List of common misconceptions.” The contents range from the invention of baseball (Alexander Cartwright, not Abner Doubleday, first codified the rules) to elephant graveyards (which do not actually exist), covering the kind of “folk knowledge” that might be erroneously relayed in a grade-school classroom. Most of […]
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3:25 AM | August lives up to its definition: respected and impressive
The things we noticed in and around canine science over the past two weeks, Storified in one neat location for your convenience:[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16-31 August 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Feuerbacher E.N. (2014). Shut up and pet me! Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer petting to vocal praise in concurrent and single-alternative choice procedures, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2014.08.019 Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of […]

Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of statistics for testing cognitive judgement bias, Animal Behaviour, 95 59-69. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.06.013

Arnott E.R., Claire M. Wade & Paul D. McGreevy (2014). Environmental Factors Associated with Success Rates of Australian Stock Herding Dogs, PLoS ONE, 9 (8) e104457. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0104457

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August 30, 2014

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10:35 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 29/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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10:35 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 29/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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12:06 AM | ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond
The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

August 29, 2014

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3:27 PM | Making People Laugh About Science. It’s a Good Thing.
Why was Schrödinger afraid of his cat? Because it was both dead and alive at the same time!  Alright, so admittedly I’m no quantum theory comedian. But if you brushed up on your science communication strategies recently, attended a talk at a local science museum or read a Brain Flapping post by Dean Burnett at The Guardian, you might have noticed that science comedy is a hot thing. And for good reason. It turns out that using humour and even... Read more
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3:27 PM | Making People Laugh About Science. It’s a Good Thing.
Why was Schrödinger afraid of his cat? Because it was both dead and alive at the same time!  Alright, so admittedly I’m no quantum theory comedian. But if you brushed up on your science communication strategies recently, attended a talk at a local science museum or read a Brain Flapping post by Dean Burnett at The Guardian, you might have noticed that science comedy is a hot thing. And for good reason. It turns out that using humour and even... Read more
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3:27 PM | Making People Laugh About Science. It’s a Good Thing.
Why was Schrödinger afraid of his cat? Because it was both dead and alive at the same time!  Alright, so admittedly I’m no quantum theory comedian. But if you brushed up on your science communication strategies recently, attended a talk at a local science museum or read a Brain Flapping post by Dean Burnett at The Guardian, you might have noticed that science comedy is a hot thing. And for good reason. It turns out that using humour and even... Read more
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2:45 PM | Who is a science writer?
August 28 was Orientation Day at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University, where I’ve enrolled with the Science, Health & Environmental Reporting Program (SHERP) for the 2014 fall term. It was an exciting day for many reasons. The first such moment was meeting the wonderful people who are to be my classmates for the […]

August 28, 2014

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1:00 PM | A summer of science journalism with the Wellcome Trust-New Statesman scholarship
 Earlier this year the Wellcome Trust and New Statesman announced a joint programme offering paid internships to aspiring science writers from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. The recipients of the first two scholarships spent eight weeks working at New Statesman. Ajit Niranjan, tells us about the experience… This summer I worked as a science writer for the […]
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2:54 AM | THE Darwin Fish.
Looks like this guy: Is the cartoon version of this guy: It walks. It breathes air. And apparently it can adapt to terrestrial life relatively “easily”. The scientists raised groups of bichir on land for eight months to find out how they would differ from bichir raised in the water. They found that the land-raised fish […]

August 27, 2014

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4:23 PM | Help Stop Ebola with this One Simple Trick!*
I mean, other than donating to aid organizations that desperately need help, that is. See, yesterday, it was revealed there was yet another Western person being treated with ZMapp. Yep, that experimental drug that the world supposedly ran out of … Continue reading →
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3:02 PM | On the back of the beast
We’ve joined scientists atop a frozen debris lobe, a slow-moving landslide in permafrost. They say we’re ‘on the back of the beast’. In the heavy rain and among fog-shrouded mountains, the scientists are making these uphill treks to record how temperature, water pressure, and local geological properties determine the slope movement of the massive lobes. These repeat measurements obtained at incredible accuracy can one day help us decode the secrets of the many massive […]
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3:02 PM | On the back of the beast
We’ve joined scientists atop a frozen debris lobe, a slow-moving landslide in permafrost. They say we’re ‘on the back of the beast’. In the heavy rain and among fog-shrouded mountains, the scientists are making these uphill treks to record how temperature, water pressure, and local geological properties determine the slope movement of the massive lobes. These repeat measurements obtained at incredible accuracy can one day help us decode the secrets of the many massive […]
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9:00 AM | Climate Change Communication: Taking the Temperature (Part 1)
Editor's Note: This is a guest blog post by Kirk Englehardt (@kirkenglehardt). Kirk is Director of Research Communication and Marketing for the Georgia Institute of Technology. He blogs about strategic communication & #scicomm on LinkedIn and The Strategy Room.  He also curates and shares #scicomm content, which can be found on Flipboard, Pinterest, Google+ and Facebook.  Introduction: A few weeks ago, I was chatting with a college friend who now works as a […]

August 25, 2014

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2:51 PM | Pikas on Ice
Another fine guest post from Holly Menninger and the ESA2014 EcoCommCrew: Adorable and fuzzy, American pikas have become the spokes-critter for the consequences of climate change in alpine areas. Pika sketch by biological illustrator, Jennifer Landin.

August 24, 2014

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2:54 PM | Organisms before questions: a case for restructuring talks at academic conferences
I’m a relatively novice conference-goer, having been to a total of five conferences in my time in academia. Three were when I was an undergrad, and found everything interesting. Two have been as a third/fourth year grad student, where I’ve … Continue reading →

August 23, 2014

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10:47 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 22/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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10:47 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 22/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

August 22, 2014

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8:56 PM | If I’m Gonna Drop Anything, It’ll be Bricks, Not Names
I really hate having to justify myself. I hate having to roll out “credentials” and be constantly challenged on whether or not I have the “right” to discuss philosophy or ethics, or why I am actually offering a bit more … Continue reading →
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7:30 PM | Within and Beyond Academia – Science Communications Intro for Graduate Students
Natasha and I had often chatted about me running a science communication workshop/presentation for graduate students in the department. A few months ago this became a reality – and it worked quite well since there had been some interests among the students to learn about career paths alternative to an academic one. I put together a […]
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11:30 AM | GeoTalk: Meet Anna Rabitti, winner of I’m a Geoscientist, Get me out of here!
Earlier this year we ran the first ever I’m a Geoscientist, Get me out of here! event, an online chat-based game show in which school kids vote for their favourite geoscience communicators. In this week’s GeoTalk, Sara Mynott  talks to Anna Rabitti, an oceanography PhD student and winner of this year’s I’m a Geoscientist…   […]
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1:46 AM | Hollywood Science is Getting Better
There was a time when scientists in the movies were consistently made into villains, odd-balls or crazy-haired geeks. Think Frankenstein, Back to the Future, or even Nightmare Before Christmas. I’ve long been fascinated by science fiction and science in Hollywood. If anyone can remember back far enough, I began this very blog with a pitch to Nature Network (now SciLogs.com) to cover science in film. One of my first ever blog posts explored genetic sequencing and genetic profiling […]
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1:46 AM | Hollywood Science is Getting Better
There was a time when scientists in the movies were consistently made into villains, odd-balls or crazy-haired geeks. Think Frankenstein, Back to the Future, or even Nightmare Before Christmas. I’ve long been fascinated by science fiction and science in Hollywood. If anyone can remember back far enough, I began this very blog with a pitch to Nature Network (now SciLogs.com) to cover science in film. One of my first ever blog posts explored genetic sequencing and genetic profiling […]
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1:46 AM | Hollywood Science is Getting Better
There was a time when scientists in the movies were consistently made into villains, odd-balls or crazy-haired geeks. Think Frankenstein, Back to the Future, or even Nightmare Before Christmas. I’ve long been fascinated by science fiction and science in Hollywood. If anyone can remember back far enough, I began this very blog with a pitch to Nature Network (now SciLogs.com) to cover science in film. One of my first ever blog posts explored genetic sequencing and genetic profiling […]

August 20, 2014

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10:30 AM | GeoEd: The Future’s Bright
What got you hooked to science in the first place? More importantly, what or who persuaded you that making science your career was, not only worth considering, but should be actively pursed? I’m sure, I am preaching to the converted; we all think science is not only cool, but a worthwhile and rewarding career path; […]

August 19, 2014

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8:15 AM | Farewell lab bench, hello writing desk
Friday was my last day at the John Innes Centre. Although I’m happy to be moving on to new things, I’m going to miss the place and the wonderful people I’ve been working with over the last 5 years. In the past … Continue reading →
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