Posts

October 01, 2014

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2:01 PM | Emergence: The Remarkable Simplicity Of Complexity
Patterns of emergence are all around us. Credit: Feliciano Guimarães/Flickr, CC BYBy Andy Martin, University of Melbourne and Kristian Helmerson, Monash UniversityFrom the fractal patterns of snowflakes to cellular lifeforms, our universe is full of complex phenomena – but how does this complexity arise? read more
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8:00 AM | The Price of a Spherical Cow
The Value of Idealized Models I’m going to take some exception to something, again. Superficially, it might seem like a good thing if our theoretical models can match real-world data. But is it? If I succeed in making a computer spit out accurate numbers from a model that is too complex for my meagre mortal [...]
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2:33 AM | CMB Part 1: The “Smoking Gun” of the Big Bang (Synopsis)
When you think about it, it wasn’t all that long ago — just 50 years — that we didn’t know where our Universe came from. A hot, dense early state? A cyclical, swirling past? Or perhaps a time-independent one, where the Universe back then was not so different from our own today? All that changed in…
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12:11 AM | Angular Momentum Paul Andersen explains rotating object have...
Angular Momentum Paul Andersen explains rotating object have angular momentum. The angular momentum of a point object is the product of the distant from the center of rotation and the linear momentum. The angular momentum of an extended object is a product of the rotational inertia and the angular velocity. The change in angular momentum is equal to the product of the net torque and the change in time. Uploaded by: Bozeman Science.

September 30, 2014

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8:13 PM | How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses
Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might […]

Ade P.A.R., M. Amiri, D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock & G. Davis & (2014). BICEP2. II. EXPERIMENT AND THREE-YEAR DATA SET, The Astrophysical Journal, 792 (1) 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/792/1/62

Ade P.A.R., D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock, C. D. Dowell & L. Duband & (2014). Detection of B-Mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales by BICEP2, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.112.241101

Planck Collaboration, R. Adam, P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, J. G. Bartlett & N. Bartolo (2014). Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.5738v1

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8:13 PM | How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses
Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might […]

Ade P.A.R., M. Amiri, D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock & G. Davis & (2014). BICEP2. II. EXPERIMENT AND THREE-YEAR DATA SET, The Astrophysical Journal, 792 (1) 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/792/1/62

Ade P.A.R., D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock, C. D. Dowell & L. Duband & (2014). Detection of B-Mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales by BICEP2, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.112.241101

Planck Collaboration, R. Adam, P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, J. G. Bartlett & N. Bartolo (2014). Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.5738v1

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8:13 PM | How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses
Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might […]

Ade P.A.R., M. Amiri, D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock & G. Davis & (2014). BICEP2. II. EXPERIMENT AND THREE-YEAR DATA SET, The Astrophysical Journal, 792 (1) 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/792/1/62

Ade P.A.R., D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock, C. D. Dowell & L. Duband & (2014). Detection of B-Mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales by BICEP2, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.112.241101

Planck Collaboration, R. Adam, P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, J. G. Bartlett & N. Bartolo (2014). Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.5738v1

Citation
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8:13 PM | How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses
Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might […]

Ade P.A.R., M. Amiri, D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock & G. Davis & (2014). BICEP2. II. EXPERIMENT AND THREE-YEAR DATA SET, The Astrophysical Journal, 792 (1) 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/792/1/62

Ade P.A.R., D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock, C. D. Dowell & L. Duband & (2014). Detection of B-Mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales by BICEP2, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.112.241101

Planck Collaboration, R. Adam, P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, J. G. Bartlett & N. Bartolo (2014). Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.5738v1

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6:51 PM | Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?
On the roof of the world in Tibet, Natalie Kehrwald and her colleagues have made a surprising discovery about climate and glaciers.
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6:27 PM | Teleportation or Travel at the Speed of Light? When a fan asks...
Teleportation or Travel at the Speed of Light? When a fan asks whether teleportation or travel at the speed of light is more likely to happen sooner, guest host Bill Nye the Science Guy points out the practical problems with both to co-host Eugene Mirman. After a careful consideration of the physics of light speed and the incredible amount of energy required for teleportation, Bill grudgingly chooses teleportation, but Astro Mike Massimino is holding out for FTL travel so we can get someplace […]
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5:10 PM | If matter falls down, does antimatter fall up? If you could make...
If matter falls down, does antimatter fall up? If you could make a ball out of antimatter, what would happen if you dropped it? The common physics wisdom is that matter and antimatter behave the same under gravity, so it would fall under earth’s gravity just as a ball of matter would. (That is, as long as you make sure you keep that ball away from any matter in the vicinity. Otherwise you’ll have a little uh-oh on your hands: when matter and antimatter meet they annihilate.) But […]
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4:17 PM | Metaphors and Style
Two language-related items crossed in the Information Supercollider today: the first was Tom’s commentary on an opinion piece by Robert Crease and Alfred Goldhaber, the second Steven Pinker on the badness of academic writing. All of them are worth reading, and I only have small dissents to offer here. One is that, unlike Tom and…
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3:40 PM | At Long Last, An Invisibility Cloak We Can Believe In
By using simple, inexpensive, and readily available materials, researchers at at the University of Rochester have developed an optical system that can actually hide objects in the visible spectrum of light. Read more...
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2:20 PM | Yes, Some Rainbows Only Have One Color
Not all rainbows are as colorful as their reputation suggests. There are some spectacular monochrome rainbows, when the conditions are right. The cooler shades drop out of the rainbow, leaving bands of yellow, orange, and red. Sometimes the rainbow narrows down to a bright red streak of light.Read more...
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10:47 AM | Top Mass: CMS Again On Top!
I wonder how interesting can be to an outsider to learn that the mass of the sixth quark is now known to 0.38% accuracy, thanks to the combination of measurements of that quantity performed by the CMS experiment at CERN. In fact, the previously best measurement was the one recently published by the DZERO collaboration at Fermilab, which has a relative 0.43% accuracy. "So what" - you might say - "this 14% improvement does not change my life". That's undeniably true.read more
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8:23 AM | A Real Tractor Beam
In this weeks’ news, Weizmann Institute scientists and researchers in Australia have invented a sort of tractor beam. In essence, a tractor beam is a wave that propagates outwards but pulls objects toward its point of origin, rather than pushing them out. Like the science fiction versions, such “beams” might be designed in the future…
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8:00 AM | It Shows
So You’re Not a Physicist … I’m a tad conflicted here. On the one hand, there’s technical accuracy. On the other, there’s poetic license, and on the third hand there’s “Meh”. I do think there is a danger in this. People will end up perceive the wrong idea of a physics concept if their exposure [...]
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8:00 AM | Combing the Sky … for a Good Explanation
Finding Extrasolar Planets with Lasers This ought to be better, and the fact that it isn’t reflects very poorly on the writer, and on the Planetary Society for not demanding better. I find this particularly annoying because it has this “all these big words! Optical physics is Hard!” vibe to it. It would be easy [...]
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4:00 AM | The Book of Universes: Exploring the Outer Limits of the Cosmos
By John D Barrow Synopsis: An unforgettable tour of the strange and wonderful universes that modern physics posits might-just might-be out there. Einstein’s theory of general relativity opens the door to other universes, and weird universes […]
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2:57 AM | The Physics of Time Travel
Is it real or not? We’ve seen in many movies and novels that characters travel back or forth in time. But can it ever be achieved? Most of you would think that time travel is impossible and only fictional. After all, Newton stated that time travels like an arrow, which never comes back again. However, […]
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12:52 AM | There’s nothing quite like renewables: Modeling indicates natural gas production will not reduce future greenhouse gas emissions as hoped
Appropriate and useful climate policy-making requires accurate and reliable data about the future.  Nowhere is this more important than when setting carbon emission standards and projecting percentages of each energy source to match energy needs (coal, natural gas, nuclear, renewables, etc.). … Continue reading →

Steven J Davis and Robert H Socolow (2014). Commitment accounting of CO2 emissions, Environmental Research Letters, 9 (084018)

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12:11 AM | Rotational Motion Paul Andersen explains how a net torque...
Rotational Motion Paul Andersen explains how a net torque acting on an object will create rotational motion. This motion can be described by the angular displacement, angular velocity, and angular acceleration. The linear velocity can be calculated by determining the distance from the axis of rotation. The net torque is equal to the product of the rotational inertia and the angular acceleration. Uploaded by: Bozeman Science.

September 29, 2014

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11:26 PM | A Molecular Microphone Scientists have made a microphone out of...
A Molecular Microphone Scientists have made a microphone out of a molecule. The tiny sensor is capable of picking up vibrations the size of a proton, physicists report in the journal Physical Review Letters.  The researchers measured the vibrations of atoms in a crystal by embedding molecules of dibenzoterrylene, or DBT, within. The colors of light emitted by a DBT molecule as it undergoes jumps between different energy levels can be used to identify vibration in the […]
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8:05 PM | Cloudy climate change: How clouds affect Earth’s...
Cloudy climate change: How clouds affect Earth’s temperature As the Earth’s surface temperature gradually rises, it has become vital for us to predict the rate of this increase with as much precision as possible. In order to do that, scientists need to understand more about aerosols and clouds. Jasper Kirkby details an experiment at CERN that aims to do just that. View full lesson: […]
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7:40 PM | Listen to the Strange Phenomenon of "Singing Stones"
Around the world there are strange fields of boulders that "sing" when they are tapped. We'll let you listen to some stones singing, and tell you why scientists think these rocks make music.Read more...
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7:04 PM | Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees
Survival tip: don’t hang around machines that have giant spinning blades. It’s a lesson bats have been slow to learn, judging by the large numbers of their corpses found beneath wind turbines. New video footage suggests some bats are attracted to wind farms because they can’t tell turbines apart from trees. If it’s true, this […]The post Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees appeared first on Inkfish.

Paul. M. Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen, Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher, Robert H. Diehl, Manuela M. Huso, David T. S. Hayman, Paul D. Fricker, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Douglas H. Johnson & Kevin Heist (2014). Behavior of bats at wind turbines, PNAS, Other:

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7:04 PM | Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees
Survival tip: don’t hang around machines that have giant spinning blades. It’s a lesson bats have been slow to learn, judging by the large numbers of their corpses found beneath wind turbines. New video footage suggests some bats are attracted to wind farms because they can’t tell turbines apart from trees. If it’s true, this […]The post Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees appeared first on Inkfish.

Paul. M. Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen, Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher, Robert H. Diehl, Manuela M. Huso, David T. S. Hayman, Paul D. Fricker, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Douglas H. Johnson & Kevin Heist (2014). Behavior of bats at wind turbines, PNAS, Other:

Citation
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7:04 PM | Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees
Survival tip: don’t hang around machines that have giant spinning blades. It’s a lesson bats have been slow to learn, judging by the large numbers of their corpses found beneath wind turbines. New video footage suggests some bats are attracted to wind farms because they can’t tell turbines apart from trees. If it’s true, this […]The post Wind Turbines Kill Bats by Impersonating Trees appeared first on Inkfish.

Paul. M. Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen, Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher, Robert H. Diehl, Manuela M. Huso, David T. S. Hayman, Paul D. Fricker, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Douglas H. Johnson & Kevin Heist (2014). Behavior of bats at wind turbines, PNAS, Other:

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6:40 PM | A Simple Optical Phenomenon That No One's Figured Out Yet
Most of us have seen halos around the sun. We know why they happen. And then there are Bottlinger's Rings. No one has figured out why they exist.Read more...
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2:09 PM | The Invisibility Cloak You've Been Waiting For
This device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects in plain sight. Continue reading →
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