Posts

April 18, 2015

+
4:31 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 17/04/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
9:17 AM | Physics Week in Review: April 18, 2015
In honor of Tax Day in the US, here is a piece on the IRS’s Favorite Mathematical Law: Armed with Benford’s law, “the IRS can sniff out falsified returns just by looking at the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

April 17, 2015

+
11:50 PM | Ask Ethan #84: Where did light first come from? (Synopsis)
“Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.” -Terry Pratchett If you want, you can imagine back in the Universe to a time before it looked anything like ours did. Before there…
+
9:34 PM | Le masse che fanno la differenza
La differenza di massa tra neutrone e protone è decisamente molto piccola. Le ultime notizie la danno a circa 2.53 volte la massa dell'elettrone, che è qualcosa come poco più di 0.5 MeV. Questa differenza di massa tra le due particelle nucleari è fondamentale per il nostro universo: esso, infatti, sarebbe profondamente diverso da come appare se, per esempio, questa differenza fosse di circa un terzo del valore attuale, ovvero di poco inferiore alla massa […]

Wilczek F. (2015). Particle physics: A weighty mass difference, Nature, 520 (7547) 303-304. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14381

Borsanyi S., Durr S., Fodor Z., Hoelbling C., Katz S.D., Krieg S., Lellouch L., Lippert T., Portelli A., Szabo K.K. & Toth B.C. (2015). Ab initio calculation of the neutron-proton mass difference, Science, 347 (6229) 1452-1455. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1257050

Lenz F. (1951). The Ratio of Proton and Electron Masses, Physical Review, 82 (4) 554-554. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrev.82.554.2

Citation
+
9:34 PM | Le masse che fanno la differenza
La differenza di massa tra neutrone e protone è decisamente molto piccola. Le ultime notizie la danno a circa 2.53 volte la massa dell'elettrone, che è qualcosa come poco più di 0.5 MeV. Questa differenza di massa tra le due particelle nucleari è fondamentale per il nostro universo: esso, infatti, sarebbe profondamente diverso da come appare se, per esempio, questa differenza fosse di circa un terzo del valore attuale, ovvero di poco inferiore alla massa […]

Wilczek F. (2015). Particle physics: A weighty mass difference, Nature, 520 (7547) 303-304. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14381

Borsanyi S., Durr S., Fodor Z., Hoelbling C., Katz S.D., Krieg S., Lellouch L., Lippert T., Portelli A., Szabo K.K. & Toth B.C. (2015). Ab initio calculation of the neutron-proton mass difference, Science, 347 (6229) 1452-1455. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1257050

Lenz F. (1951). The Ratio of Proton and Electron Masses, Physical Review, 82 (4) 554-554. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrev.82.554.2

Citation
+
9:34 PM | Le masse che fanno la differenza
La differenza di massa tra neutrone e protone è decisamente molto piccola. Le ultime notizie la danno a circa 2.53 volte la massa dell'elettrone, che è qualcosa come poco più di 0.5 MeV. Questa differenza di massa tra le due particelle nucleari è fondamentale per il nostro universo: esso, infatti, sarebbe profondamente diverso da come appare se, per esempio, questa differenza fosse di circa un terzo del valore attuale, ovvero di poco inferiore alla massa […]

Wilczek F. (2015). Particle physics: A weighty mass difference, Nature, 520 (7547) 303-304. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14381

Borsanyi S., Durr S., Fodor Z., Hoelbling C., Katz S.D., Krieg S., Lellouch L., Lippert T., Portelli A., Szabo K.K. & Toth B.C. (2015). Ab initio calculation of the neutron-proton mass difference, Science, 347 (6229) 1452-1455. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1257050

Lenz F. (1951). The Ratio of Proton and Electron Masses, Physical Review, 82 (4) 554-554. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrev.82.554.2

Citation
+
3:14 PM | The downfall of coal: job trends in a changing energy landscape
Recent years have not been good to the coal industry. Through the 20th century, the industry had a strong clamp on electricity generation with coal-fired power plants littering the US landscape. Electricity demand had been growing steadily, and coal executives … Continue reading →

Haerer, D. & Pratson, L. (2015). Employment trends in the U.S. Electricity Sector, 2008–2012, Energy Policy, 82 85-98. DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2015.03.006

Citation
+
2:43 PM | Einstein: Travelling through Spacetime
60th anniversary of the death of Albert Einstein: How his general relativity theory changed the world. Albert Einstein was a true revolutionary: he challenged Newtonian physics, and won. “Space” and “time” are not considered absolute anymore, but can be “curved” or “dilated” in the four dimensional fabric of spacetime. And gravitation is not a force, […]
+
1:40 PM | SteelyKid, Galactic Engineer
“Hey, Daddy, did you know that in five or six million years the Sun is going to explode.” “It’s five or six billion years, with a ‘b.'” “Right, in five or six billion years, the Sun’s going to explode.” “Well, a star like our Sun won’t really explode. It’ll swell up really big, probably swallow…
+
2:05 AM | Uncovering the mystery of stellar nurseries
Want to know how baby stars are born? So does the winner of the CSIRO Alumni 2015 Scholarship in Physics award, Claire-Elise Green. Her PhD research looks at molecular clouds and how they act as stellar nurseries during star formation. Find out more about Claire-Elise, her research and her passion for science.
+
12:56 AM | Throwback Thursday: Is the Universe fine-tuned for us? (Synopsis)
“There is a voice inside of you That whispers all day long, ‘I feel this is right for me, I know that this is wrong.’” -Shel Silverstein It’s pretty obvious that the Universe exists in such a way that it admits the possibility of intelligent life arising. After all, we’re here, we’re intelligent life, and…

April 16, 2015

+
11:40 PM | What Happens To Someone Standing Next To Plutonium That Goes Critical?
A horrible accident at Los Alamos in 1958 illustrates what happens to a person's body when they stand next to plutonium during a chain reaction. Read more...
+
9:51 PM | 3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Terrible! Nuclear energy might...
3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Terrible! Nuclear energy might be a failed experiment. In over sixty years the technology has not only failed to keep its promise of cheap, clean and safe energy, it also caused major catastrophes and enabled more nuclear weapons while the nuclear waste problem is still not solved. By: Kurz Gesagt - In a Nutshell. Support at: https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt
+
9:13 PM | 3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Awesome! Nuclear energy might...
3 Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Is Awesome! Nuclear energy might have a lot of unused potential. Not only is it one of the best mid term solutions for global warming bit despite what gut feeling tells us, it has saved millions of lives. By investing more into better technologies we might be able to make nuclear energy finally save and clean forever. By: Kurz Gesagt - In a Nutshell. Support at: https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt
+
8:35 PM | What’s It Like In A Black Hole? Have you ever wondered...
What’s It Like In A Black Hole? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be inside a Black Hole? What would you see? How would your body react? Let’s find out! By: Life Noggin.
+
7:04 PM | How It Works: The Large Hadron Collider
The world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), famously upended physics with the discovery of the long-sought Higgs boson in 2012. But it was only operating at half power. Since then, the LHC has undergone a massive upgrade, and this spring, it will ramp back up for a second run at near full strength. For the next three years, more than 12,000 scientists will use the LHC to explore the deepest and weirdest questions in particle physics. What they […]
+
5:40 PM | Ep. 373: Becquerel Experiment (Radiation)
Antoine Henri Becquerel discovered radioactivity completely by accident when he exposed a chunk of uranium to a photographic plate. This opened up a whole new field of research to uncover the source of the mysterious energy. Download the show [MP3] | Jump to Shownotes | Jump to Transcript This episode is sponsored by: Swinburne Astronomy Online, […]
+
2:54 PM | How did a curious mind like Richard Feynman’s become the curious...
How did a curious mind like Richard Feynman’s become the curious mind of Richard Feynman? via jtotheizzoe: This video, the last in the wonderful “The Experimenters” series from Blank on Blank (which also features rare interviews with Jane Goodall and Buckminster Fuller), draws a picture of Feynman’s childhood and the early scientific inspiration passed on from his father, a man with no formal science education, but who possessed an infectious and overarching curiosity […]
+
2:00 PM | The era of organo-plasmonic devices
One of the greatest inventions of the 20th century, if not the greatest, was the transistor. It revolutionized the electronics industry and changed the way […] Read more The post The era of organo-plasmonic devices appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Plasmonic response depends on the shape of the gap Polymers are not standard glasses A planar pentacoordinate carbon
+
1:38 PM | The Large Hadron Collider Returns | Breaking Science The...
The Large Hadron Collider Returns | Breaking Science The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has reopened the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC returns to service after technological improvements and will continue to aid scientists in further study of our universe, including the Higgs boson particle and beyond. By: General Electric.
+
4:00 AM | The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics
By Roger Penrose Synopsis: For decades, proponents of artificial intelligence have argued that computers will soon be doing everything that a human mind can do. Admittedly, computers now play chess at the grandmaster level, but do […]
+
2:00 AM | How To Do Particle Physics On The Cheap
Particle physics normally goes hand-in-hand with giant subterranean research facilities and data-processing measured in petaflops. But if you don’t have a research grant the size of Latvia’s GDP, investigating the wonders of subatomic particles can be kinda difficult. Read more...

April 15, 2015

+
11:59 PM | What the hell are Baryon Acoustic Oscillations? (Synopsis)
“If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.” -Philip K. Dick When it comes to measuring the expansion history of the Universe, the concept is simple enough: take something you know about an object, like a mass, a size, or a brightness, then measure what the mass, size or brightness appears…
+
11:44 PM | Neil deGrasse Tyson: Tears in space and other things “Gravity”...
Neil deGrasse Tyson: Tears in space and other things “Gravity” got right Neil deGrasse Tyson’s tweets about science mysteries in the movie “Gravity” made the news, but there were “hundreds of things” they got right. Neil talks about a few of his favorites in this video from Business Insider and StarTalk Radio. You’ll hear about the depiction of tears and liquid surface tension in space, the use of the fire extinguisher as a rocket, the total […]
+
10:29 PM | Center of Mass By: Bozeman Science. Support at:...
Center of Mass By: Bozeman Science. Support at: http://www.bozemanscience.com/donate/
+
7:30 PM | Why Do Knuckles Go Pop? Researchers May Finally Have The Answer.
There's some disagreement among physiologists about knuckle-cracking and how it produces its characteristic popping sound. Now, Canadian scientists have used MRI scans to watch what happens inside a cracking finger joint in real time – and their observations may have settled this longstanding debate for good.Read more...
+
6:00 PM | Complex cognition shaped the Stone Age hand axe, study shows
Even with extensive training, the modern mind finds it challenging to make an Acheulean hand axe. "We should have respect for Stone Age tool makers," says experimental archeologist Dietrich Stout. Photo by Carol Clark.By Carol ClarkThe ability to make a Lower Paleolithic hand axe depends on complex cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex, including the “central executive” function of working memory, a new study finds.  PLOS ONE published the results, which knock another […]
+
5:15 PM | What Does The Higgs Boson Sound Like? [Video]
Sometimes for fun I'll watch a movie, or if I'm feeling industrious maybe I'll knit a scarf. When you're a physicist at CERN, the things you do for fun are apparently a…
+
2:43 PM | My Quantum Alarm Clock
One of the things I struggle with a bit when it comes to writing about cool modern physics is how much to play up the weirdness. On the one hand, people just can’t get enough of “spooky action at a distance,” but on the other hand, talking too much about that sort of thing makes…
+
1:38 PM | How Does Coal Walking Work? While some claim walking on hot...
How Does Coal Walking Work? While some claim walking on hot coals is mind over matter, there’s actually a science to not burning yourself, involving conductivity and insulation. Learn more at HowStuffWorks.com: http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/arts/circus-arts/firewalking.htm By: Brain Stuff.
12345678
237 Results