Posts

July 31, 2014

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9:40 PM | New Research Traces Evolution of Theropod Dinosaurs into Flying Birds
A new study published in the journal Science highlights the dramatic evolutionary transformation of carnivorous, ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs into flying birds. “Birds out-shrank and out-evolved their dinosaurian ancestors, surviving where their larger, less evolvable relatives could not,” said study lead author Dr Michael Lee of the University of Adelaide and South Australian Museum. Dr Darren [...]
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8:50 PM | Massive Collection of Ancient Amber Finally Gives Up Its Secrets
In the late 1950s, an entomologist named Milton Sanderson collected some 160 pounds of 20 million year old amber in the Dominican Republic. Now, 50 years later, that amber is finally giving up its secrets, including a fascinating insect named for David Attenborough. Read more...
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6:39 PM | Dinosaurs that led to birds were shrinking for millions of years
They also added the most new anatomical features.
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2:57 PM | Dinosaurs Had the Worst Luck
Dinosaurs aren’t dead. Not completely. Birds carry on their Mesozoic legacy. But all the forms that inspire our …
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2:08 PM | Modern Polar Explorers on the Hunt For Ancient Sea Monsters
In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. Now, the team is planning yet another project, and are getting ready for another season on the Arctic slopes.

July 30, 2014

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4:08 PM | Ancient Mystery: European Mosquitos Trapped In Asian Amber
A comparison of Baltic Sea region amber with amber from Asia could be significant - rather than being found just in Mecklenburg, Poland or Belarus, European species have been found almost 10,000 kilometers away in Fushun, even though Europe and Asia were divided by the Strait of Turgay, a wide arm of the ocean, 50 million years ago.   The pieces from the Baltic region are younger than the ones from Fushun and the assumption has been that this body of saltwater prevented species […]

July 29, 2014

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4:42 PM | Extramural Activities: Paint and Fossils
Emily Hughes brings us tales of adventure and discovery from the Australian Outback as she and her mother search for unbelievably ancient fossils. Paleontologists learn to do more than just paleontology when necessary; for them, useful skills can include making murals.

July 28, 2014

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7:42 PM | Study Sheds New Light on Extinction of Dinosaurs
According to a study published in the journal Biological Reviews, non-avian dinosaurs might have survived the impact of a large bolide about 66 million years ago if it had happened a few million years earlier or later. “There has long been intense scientific debate about the cause of the dinosaur extinction,” said Dr Richard Butler [...]
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3:00 PM | "Colossally Poor Timing" of Asteroid Caused Dinosaur Extinction
Researchers from the University of Edinburgh say the dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out had it happened slightly later or earlier in history.Read more...

July 26, 2014

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11:00 PM | Pit Filled With Thousands Of Ice Age Bones Will Be Opened To Scientists
A sinkhole in Wyoming where countless Ice Age animals fell to their deaths is finally being opened to scientists. A veritable paleontological trove, the 85-foot-deep pit contains the bones of tens of thousands of animals – some of which lived more than 100,000 years ago.Read more...

July 25, 2014

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7:48 PM | Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus: Feathered Herbivorous Dinosaur Discovered
Dr Pascal Godefroit, a paleontologist with the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, and his colleagues have discovered the fossilized remains of a feathered plant-eating dinosaur that lived in the lake-dotted lowlands of Jurassic Siberia, between 169 and 144 million years ago. Previously only carnivorous dinosaurs were known to have had feathers so [...]
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4:03 PM | Fossil hunting with the Brain Scoop
We’re big fans of Emily Graslie’s natural history video series The Brain Scoop. The latest episode goes right to the source of the museum specimens that usually take center stage—a fossil hunting expedition. Watch the whole thing, and you’ll learn some nifty paleontology jargon, like: “It’s called the 18-inch layer.” “Is it because it’s 18 […]
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2:00 PM | Downy Beast Suggests All Dinos Sported Feathers
A newly discovered dinosaur species offers hints that feathers were much more common among the ancient beasts than once thought.
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2:00 PM | Downy Beast Suggests All Dinos Sported Feathers
A newly discovered dinosaur species offers hints that feathers were much more common among the ancient beasts than once thought.

July 24, 2014

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9:16 PM | Fluffy Dinosaur Raises Questions About the Origin of Dinofuzz
Almost twenty years after fluffy little Sinosauropteryx hopped onto the scene, the existence of feathery dinosaurs is no …
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1:50 PM | New T-Rex Tracks Add to Pack-Hunting Theory
Several parallel tyrannosaur tracks unearthed in Canada suggest the hungry beasts may have stuck together to better their odds of taking down prey.
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1:50 PM | New T-Rex Tracks Add to Pack-Hunting Theory
Several parallel tyrannosaur tracks unearthed in Canada suggest the hungry beasts may have stuck together to better their odds of taking down prey.

July 23, 2014

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9:01 PM | Tracks Hint at the Social Life of Tyrant Dinosaurs
What’s scarier than a tyrannosaur? Three tyrannosaurs. That’s simple, undeniable math. The question is whether or not the …
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in 1784. Fig.1. Pterodactylus antiquus (Upper Jurassic, Eichstätt, Bavaria), specimen studied by Cosimo Collini in 1784 and copper engraving of the fossil to illustrate his scientific study [...]
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5:15 PM | Episode 201 – Pontificating Upon Paleo Pigments
00:00:00 - For our first segment we head back to Panama so Ryan can chat with fellow paleontologist Caitlin Colleary about her Masters’ work looking into the coloration of fossils. They share a ‘cervezarita’ made with the national beer of Colombia, Aguila. 01:01:02 – Back up north, everyone is still drinking. Ben takes point to talk […]
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3:49 PM | Pseudo-poo! All that glitters isn’t fecal gold
Fossil feces are the stuff of legend. Not only do they have the “gee-whiz-gross” factor, but they also preserve evidence of diet, parasites, and paleoecology in long-dead animals. An paleontological urban legend holds that the technical term–”coprolite”–was coined …The post Pseudo-poo! All that glitters isn’t fecal gold appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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12:21 AM | The Dinosaur Waited Patiently on Its Wing Legs, Ready for Flight
Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the largest four-winged dinosaur ever found . Now the gifted paleo artist Emily Willoughby has created this lovely image of Changyuraptor yangi, where you can clearly see its "leg wings." Read more...

July 21, 2014

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7:30 PM | Museum of Western Colorado Unearths a Jurassic Record-Breaker
Apatosaurus was an enormous dinosaur. That’s something easily said, but can’t be understood without spending time in the …

July 18, 2014

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10:19 PM | Baby Mammoths Yield Hi-Res Details for Paleontologists
There’s only one fossil that ever made me cry. Lyuba, a one month old woolly mammoth, made me …
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1:54 AM | Feathery Fossil Gives Flying Dinosaurs a Size Boost
Early last week, in the pages of PNAS, paleontologist Dan Ksepka unveiled one of the largest dinosaurs ever …

July 17, 2014

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2:35 PM | Lyrarapax unguispinus: Paleontologists Discover New Cambrian Marine Predator
Paleontologists led by Dr Nicholas Strausfeld from the University of Arizona’s Center for Insect Science have discovered the fossilized remains of Lyrarapax unguispinus – one of the world’s first known predators that lived in what in now southwest China during the Cambrian period, about 520 million years ago. Lyrarapax unguispinus (Latin for ‘spiny-clawed lyre-shaped predator’) [...]

July 16, 2014

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7:40 PM | 520-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster Unearthed in China
One of the first predators of its day, the creature sported compound eyes, body armor and two spiky claws for grabbing prey.
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7:20 PM | Fossils of strange Cambrian predator preserved with brain impressions
Carbon marks where nerves once resided inside the animal's exoskeleton.
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5:38 PM | Changyuraptor yangi: New Feathered Dinosaur Discovered in China
A team of paleontologists from China, the United States and South Africa has described a new species of a feathered dinosaur that lived in what is now northeastern China during the Cretaceous period, about 125 million years ago. The new dinosaur, named Changyuraptor yangi, belongs to Microraptoria – a specific group of predatory four-winged raptorial [...]
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