Posts

July 25, 2014

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7:48 PM | Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus: Feathered Herbivorous Dinosaur Discovered
Dr Pascal Godefroit, a paleontologist with the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, and his colleagues have discovered the fossilized remains of a feathered plant-eating dinosaur that lived in the lake-dotted lowlands of Jurassic Siberia, between 169 and 144 million years ago. Previously only carnivorous dinosaurs were known to have had feathers so [...]
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4:03 PM | Fossil hunting with the Brain Scoop
We’re big fans of Emily Graslie’s natural history video series The Brain Scoop. The latest episode goes right to the source of the museum specimens that usually take center stage—a fossil hunting expedition. Watch the whole thing, and you’ll learn some nifty paleontology jargon, like: “It’s called the 18-inch layer.” “Is it because it’s 18 […]
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2:00 PM | Downy Beast Suggests All Dinos Sported Feathers
A newly discovered dinosaur species offers hints that feathers were much more common among the ancient beasts than once thought.
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2:00 PM | Downy Beast Suggests All Dinos Sported Feathers
A newly discovered dinosaur species offers hints that feathers were much more common among the ancient beasts than once thought.

July 24, 2014

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9:16 PM | Fluffy Dinosaur Raises Questions About the Origin of Dinofuzz
Almost twenty years after fluffy little Sinosauropteryx hopped onto the scene, the existence of feathery dinosaurs is no …
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1:50 PM | New T-Rex Tracks Add to Pack-Hunting Theory
Several parallel tyrannosaur tracks unearthed in Canada suggest the hungry beasts may have stuck together to better their odds of taking down prey.
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1:50 PM | New T-Rex Tracks Add to Pack-Hunting Theory
Several parallel tyrannosaur tracks unearthed in Canada suggest the hungry beasts may have stuck together to better their odds of taking down prey.

July 23, 2014

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9:01 PM | Tracks Hint at the Social Life of Tyrant Dinosaurs
What’s scarier than a tyrannosaur? Three tyrannosaurs. That’s simple, undeniable math. The question is whether or not the …
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in 1784. Fig.1. Pterodactylus antiquus (Upper Jurassic, Eichstätt, Bavaria), specimen studied by Cosimo Collini in 1784 and copper engraving of the fossil to illustrate his scientific study [...]
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5:15 PM | Episode 201 – Pontificating Upon Paleo Pigments
00:00:00 - For our first segment we head back to Panama so Ryan can chat with fellow paleontologist Caitlin Colleary about her Masters’ work looking into the coloration of fossils. They share a ‘cervezarita’ made with the national beer of Colombia, Aguila. 01:01:02 – Back up north, everyone is still drinking. Ben takes point to talk […]
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3:49 PM | Pseudo-poo! All that glitters isn’t fecal gold
Fossil feces are the stuff of legend. Not only do they have the “gee-whiz-gross” factor, but they also preserve evidence of diet, parasites, and paleoecology in long-dead animals. An paleontological urban legend holds that the technical term–”coprolite”–was coined …The post Pseudo-poo! All that glitters isn’t fecal gold appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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12:21 AM | The Dinosaur Waited Patiently on Its Wing Legs, Ready for Flight
Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the largest four-winged dinosaur ever found . Now the gifted paleo artist Emily Willoughby has created this lovely image of Changyuraptor yangi, where you can clearly see its "leg wings." Read more...

July 21, 2014

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7:30 PM | Museum of Western Colorado Unearths a Jurassic Record-Breaker
Apatosaurus was an enormous dinosaur. That’s something easily said, but can’t be understood without spending time in the …

July 18, 2014

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10:19 PM | Baby Mammoths Yield Hi-Res Details for Paleontologists
There’s only one fossil that ever made me cry. Lyuba, a one month old woolly mammoth, made me …
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1:54 AM | Feathery Fossil Gives Flying Dinosaurs a Size Boost
Early last week, in the pages of PNAS, paleontologist Dan Ksepka unveiled one of the largest dinosaurs ever …

July 17, 2014

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2:35 PM | Lyrarapax unguispinus: Paleontologists Discover New Cambrian Marine Predator
Paleontologists led by Dr Nicholas Strausfeld from the University of Arizona’s Center for Insect Science have discovered the fossilized remains of Lyrarapax unguispinus – one of the world’s first known predators that lived in what in now southwest China during the Cambrian period, about 520 million years ago. Lyrarapax unguispinus (Latin for ‘spiny-clawed lyre-shaped predator’) [...]

July 16, 2014

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7:40 PM | 520-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster Unearthed in China
One of the first predators of its day, the creature sported compound eyes, body armor and two spiky claws for grabbing prey.
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7:20 PM | Fossils of strange Cambrian predator preserved with brain impressions
Carbon marks where nerves once resided inside the animal's exoskeleton.
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5:38 PM | Changyuraptor yangi: New Feathered Dinosaur Discovered in China
A team of paleontologists from China, the United States and South Africa has described a new species of a feathered dinosaur that lived in what is now northeastern China during the Cretaceous period, about 125 million years ago. The new dinosaur, named Changyuraptor yangi, belongs to Microraptoria – a specific group of predatory four-winged raptorial [...]
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12:07 AM | Now THIS Is a Badass Feathered Tyrannosaurus Rex
Don't mess with old feather-head. That's what they say, and you can see why.Read more...

July 15, 2014

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7:30 PM | Stolen 'Nest of Dinosaurs' Returned to Mongolia
More than 18 dinosaur skeletons illegally taken from Mongolia were formally returned to their homeland during a ceremony in New York last week, U.S. authorities announced.
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3:55 PM | Oetzi The Tyrolean Iceman's 'Non-Human' DNA
Much of what we know about Öetzi - the 'Tyrolean Iceman’ – such as what he looked like and that he suffered from lactose intolerance, stems from a tiny bone sample which allowed the decoding of his genetic make-up. A team of scientists have examined the part of the sample consisting of non-human DNA. In the DNA mixture, they detected a sizeable presence of a particular bacterium: Treponema denticola, an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of periodontitis. The […]
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2:46 PM | Cretaceous Cold Case #5: When Evidence Dries Up
This is the fifth post in a series called “Cretaceous Cold Cases” in which the science of taphonomy, or prehistoric forensics, is explained by fascinating cases from the files of Terry “Bucky” Gates, a research scientist with NC State and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. South Africa, 250 million years ago. The United

July 14, 2014

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7:48 PM | North America's First Foragers Hunted These Elephant-like Creatures
A recent archeological dig in Mexico shows that gomphotheres — an extinct elephant-like animal believed to have disappeared from North America long before humans got there — actually roamed the continent longer than previously thought. Incredibly, the new evidence suggests these large mammals were hunted by the Clovis people.Read more...

July 13, 2014

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9:57 PM | Hupehwhat? Finding a home for some unusually odd marine reptiles
“Swimming sausage topped with armored mustard” is probably the best way to describe a hupehsuchian. These marine reptiles, known only from 248 million year old rocks in east-central China, were odd-balls at a time when a lot of odd-balls …The post Hupehwhat? Finding a home for some unusually odd marine reptiles appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.

July 11, 2014

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12:46 AM | Field Gear – Quarrying and Collecting Fossils
Paleontology in the field almost always involves collecting fossils. Most people have glorious mental images of collecting fossils, many of which are perpetrated by how paleontology is portrayed in movies and the media. What you see in Jurassic Park isn’t … Continue reading →

July 10, 2014

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10:02 PM | Episode 200 – The Big Two-Hundo
00:00:00 – Since we spend so much time promoting everyone else’s work, we decided to be a bit selfish and spend the first segment talking about our own science. Charlie has a paper coming out in Nature Climate Change about moving forward into a low-carbon, sustainable energy future. No big deal. Patrick has 2 papers […]
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7:35 PM | Scansoriopteryx Study Challenges Hypothesis that Birds Evolved from Dinosaurs
The re-examination of Scansoriopteryx – a sparrow-sized, pre-Archaeopteryx, bird-like creature that lived in what is today China during the Jurassic period, about 154 million years ago – challenges the widely accepted hypothesis that birds are derived from land-dwelling dinosaurs that gained the ability to fly. Unearthed in Inner Mongolia in 2002, Scansoriopteryx was previously classified [...]
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2:03 PM | Field Gear – Getting Into (and Out of) the Cave
The third week of our field season will be spent in Natural Trap Cave, which is a wonderful Pleistocene fossil locality. The only problem is that is it a cave. And a natural trap. See, the locality is at the … Continue reading →
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