Posts

March 28, 2015

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5:00 PM | Ancient, Predatory "Lobster" is an Ancestor to All Modern Arthropods
More than 250 million years before the first dinosaur, the most fearsome killers on Earth may have been lobsters. Yawunik kootenayi, a common ancestor to spiders, shrimp and butterflies, was a predatory "lobster-like" creature that ruled the seas half a billion years ago.Read more...
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3:43 PM | Yawunik kootenayi: Paleontologists Discover Cambrian Lobster-Like Animal
A multinational group of paleontologists has described a prehistoric lobster-like animal from the Marble Canyon site, part of the renowned Canadian Burgess Shale fossil deposit. The newly-discovered marine creature, named Yawunik kootenayi, lived during the middle Cambrian, approximately 508 million years ago. The species name, kootenayi, honors the Ktunaxa People, who have long inhabited the [...]
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1:21 AM | Dinosaur Whiskers?
Every day I’m home, I’m surrounded by cats. The clowder is rarely more than a few feet away …

March 27, 2015

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7:41 PM | Yawunik Kootenayi - Lobster With Two Sets Of Eyes From 500,000,000 B.C.
What do butterflies, spiders and lobsters share in common? Yawunik kootenayi, a marine creature with two pairs of eyes and prominent grasping appendages that lived 250 million years before the first dinosaur.The fossil recently identified is the first new species to be described from the Marble Canyon site, part of the Canadian Burgess Shale fossil deposit.Yawunik had evolved long frontal appendages that resemble the antennae of modern beetles or shrimps, though these appendages were composed […]

March 25, 2015

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2:57 PM | Paleontologists Uncover “Super Salamander” Boneyard
Finding fossils takes a combination of skill on luck. You have to be looking in the right place …
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2:00 PM | Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things
About Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things Can’t get to New York to visit the American Museum of Natural History? No problem! EH Science invites you to take a virtual trip behind the scenes. In this the first episode of the museum’s brand new original series, Shelf Life, you can walk in the shoes […] The post Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things appeared first on EH Science.
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2:00 PM | Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things
About Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things Can’t get to New York to visit the American Museum of Natural History? No problem! EH Science invites you to take a virtual trip behind the scenes. In this the first episode of the museum’s brand new original series, Shelf Life, you can walk in the shoes […] The post Shelf Life Episode 1: 33 Million Things appeared first on EH Science.
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2:00 PM | Mammoths are Money
Friends of The Finch & Pea David Orr and Jennie Orr would like your help publishing an illustrated ABCs book for children, Mammoth is Mopey*. Mammoth is Mopey brings together a love of language with a love of prehistoric critters. The restrictions imposed by … Continue reading →

March 24, 2015

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7:26 PM | Favorite Examples of Evolution
When the cold bites, When the review stings, When the news is sad, I simply remember these evolving things, And then I don’t feel so bad!      — with apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein Over on Twitter, the biology … Continue reading →
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2:33 PM | Metoposaurus algarvensis: Fossils of Giant Salamander-Like Amphibian Found in Portugal
A team of scientists led by Dr Steve Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, UK, has discovered a new species of metoposaurus that lived in lakes and rivers of what is now Portugal during the Late Triassic period, between 200 and 230 million years ago. The newly-discovered species, named Metoposaurus algarvensis, belongs to an extinct [...]
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7:00 AM | Car-Sized Salamander Fossils Found In Mass Grave In Portugal
Back in the Triassic, giant amphibians were major predators. When their lake home dried up, the creatures — most closely related to modern salamanders — went extinct. And the resulting mass grave of a species called Metoposaurus algarvensis has been found in Portugal.Read more...

March 23, 2015

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7:25 PM | Sciencespeak: Pycnofiber
Pterosaurs were into fuzz before dinosaurs. That’s true in a historical sense, at least. In 1831, over a …

March 22, 2015

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7:24 PM | The Nerve of Those ‘Saurs!
We know a great deal about non-avian dinosaurs from the bones and trace fossils they left behind. But …

March 20, 2015

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7:40 PM | These 500,000-Year-Old Tools Still Contain Traces Of Animal Fat
Archaeologists working in Israel have made an extraordinary discovery — the earliest instance of Lower Paleolithic-Acheulian stone bifaces and scrapers with the residue of elephant fat still on them. It's considered an archaeological first. Read more...

March 19, 2015

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7:48 PM | Prehistoric South American Ungulate Mammals are Relatives of Horses, Study Reveals
According to a team of scientists headed by Dr Ross MacPhee from the American Museum of Natural History, South American native ungulates – the last of which went extinct roughly 10,000 years ago – are actually related to mammals like horses, tapirs, and rhinoceroses, rather than elephants and other species with ancient ties to Africa [...]
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4:50 PM | Carnivorous Croc Cousin Stalked the Triassic Carolinas
Movies have teasers. Books have sample chapters. And for fossils, there are photos of “unnamed taxa” in presentations …
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2:52 PM | Carnufex carolinensis: New Prehistoric Crocodile Discovered in North Carolina
A new species of prehistoric crocodile that dates back 231 million years ago (Carnian stage of the Triassic period) has been identified by a team of paleontologists led by Dr Lindsay Zanno of North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The newly-discovered creature, named Carnufex carolinensis, or the Carolina Butcher, [...]
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12:50 PM | Croc Ancestor 'Carolina Butcher' Ruled Before Dinos
A tall, upright beast with slicing teeth was North America's top predator before the reign of dinosaurs.
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12:50 PM | Croc Ancestor 'Carolina Butcher' Ruled Before Dinos
A tall, upright beast with slicing teeth was North America's top predator before the reign of dinosaurs.

March 17, 2015

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8:29 PM | Whale Fossil Sheds Light on Timing, Starting Elevation of East African Plateau’s Uplift
Uplift associated with the East Africa’s Great Rift Valley has puzzled scientists for many years because the timing and starting elevation have been poorly constrained. Now a team of paleontologists from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX, the University of Potsdam in Germany, and the National Museums of Kenya, has tapped a fossil from the [...]
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4:50 AM | Sciencespeak: Whale Pump
Whales can poop almost anywhere they want. They have the entire ocean to relieve themselves in, so most …

March 16, 2015

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4:00 PM | Celebrating women in science
by Susan Vickers and Lisa Willemse Communication, Education & Outreach subject editors Popular books, conferences, and the Internet (from websites to “most influential on Twitter” lists) make a compelling argument that, until very recently, science was an activity reserved for men. Were our great grandmothers uninterested in science? Were they prevented from conducting scientific research because they were women? Or were many of our female ancestors remarkable scientists whom […]
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3:41 PM | Forensic Geology and the Murder-case of Aldo Moro
Rome, March 16, 1678 a car of the type Fiat 128 suddenly braked midst of the street, prompting the following cars to crash onto it. A series of shots from a machine-gun followed, killing all of the five bodyguards of Italian prime minister Aldo Moro. The prime minister was kidnapped, days later the first messages from the Brigate-Rosse, a terrorist-association active at the time in Italy, arrived, causing a severe political crisis as the government was insecure how to deal with the terrorists […]

March 15, 2015

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12:35 PM | The Geology of the Mountains of Madness
“[]…we expected to unearth a quite unprecedented amount of material – especially in the pre-Cambrian strata of which so narrow a range of antarctic specimens had previously been secured. We wished also to obtain as great as possible a variety of the upper fossiliferous rocks, since the primal life history of this bleak realm of ice and death is of the highest importance to our knowledge of the earth’s past.“ 100 years ago only segments of the coast and the […]

March 13, 2015

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5:02 PM | Acoustic Fats, Ear Trumpets, and How Whales Hear
Up until a few days ago, I had never heard a blue whale. I wasn’t even aware they …

March 12, 2015

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9:15 PM | Human-Sized ‘Lobsters’ Lived on Earth 480 Million Years Ago
Paleontologists have discovered fossils of a 2-m-long lobster-like animal that lived in the seas of what is now Morocco during the early Ordovician period, about 480 million years ago. The newly-discovered animal, named Aegirocassis benmoulae in honor of the Moroccan fossil hunter Mohamed Ben Moula who discovered the fossils, belongs to the extinct family Anomalocarididae [...]
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8:40 PM | This Crazy-Looking Creature Was The Ocean's First Filter-Feeding Giant
Behold Aegirocassis benmoulae, an extinct creature that swam through the Earth's oceans some 480-million years ago. Discovered by paleontologists in Morocco, it possessed modified legs, gills on its back — and a filter system for feeding. Remarkably, it's the oldest known animal to fill an ecological niche now occupied by whales.Read more...
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8:10 PM | Strange Fossil Filter Feeder Was an Ancient Survivor
Paleontologist Jakob Vinther pointed to a rust-colored boulder sitting on the black lab table. “What do you think …
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7:21 PM | Early Tetrapod Skull Looks like Crocodile
Our 360 million-year-old tetrapod ancestors may have been more like modern crocodiles than previously thought, according to a new 3D skull reconstruction from the University of Bristol, UK. Acanthostega gunnari was a “four-footed” vertebrate, also known as a tetrapod, that invaded land during one of the great evolutionary transitions in Earth’s history, 380-360 million years […] The post Early Tetrapod Skull Looks like Crocodile appeared first on EH Science.
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7:21 PM | Early Tetrapod Skull Looks like Crocodile
Our 360 million-year-old tetrapod ancestors may have been more like modern crocodiles than previously thought, according to a new 3D skull reconstruction from the University of Bristol, UK. Acanthostega gunnari was a “four-footed” vertebrate, also known as a tetrapod, that invaded land during one of the great evolutionary transitions in Earth’s history, 380-360 million years […] The post Early Tetrapod Skull Looks like Crocodile appeared first on EH Science.
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