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Posts

April 24, 2014

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8:58 PM | Just How Fishy Are You? More About Your Inner Animal
Last night the final episode of the 3-part series of PBS’s adaptation of Neil Shubin’s book Your Inner Fish aired in most of the country (although some PBS stations have delayed the last... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:06 PM | Kryptodrakon progenitor: Earliest Pterodactyloid Pterosaur Discovered in China
U.S. and Chinese paleontologists say they have unearthed the fossils of what is the oldest and most primitive pterodactyloid pterosaur. This creature lived in what is today northwest China around the time of the Middle-Upper Jurassic boundary, about 163 million years ago. The reptile, named Kryptodrakon progenitor, is the first pterosaur to bear the characteristics [...]
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5:00 PM | It’s life, Charlie, but not as we know it – Charles Darwin and the search of early (Extraterrestrial) Life
In August 1881 the journal “Science” published an article with a letter exchange by two amateur geologist – British Charles R. Darwin and the German Otto Hahn- discussing the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Just some years earlier Darwin had published a book “On Origin of Species” proposing that complex life forms descended slowly over time [...]
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5:00 PM | It’s life, Charlie, but not as we know it – Charles Darwin and the search of early (Extraterrestrial) Life
In August 1881 the journal “Science” published an article with a letter exchange by two amateur geologist – British Charles R. Darwin and the German Otto Hahn- discussing the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:46 PM | How Dinosaur Teeth Traveled
Last summer, while spending a day with paleontologist Joe Peterson and his crew at the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, …
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2:58 AM | Beasts in the Walls
Relief Sculptures at the Natural History Museum, London When I was a boy in the 1960s, I was very fortunate that my family spent a year living in London. We visited the museums in South Kensington many times; I particularly loved the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum. In hindsight, it seems strange that […]

April 23, 2014

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4:36 PM | 100-Million-Year-Old Assassin Flies Found in Burmese Amber
Paleontologists have described a new species of assassin fly found preserved in two pieces of 100-million-year-old Burmese amber. Assassin flies are named for their fierce predation strategy – they ambush and catch their prey in flight. Once caught, the flies puncture the armor-like skeleton of their prey, inject them with digestive fluids and extract the [...]

April 21, 2014

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7:35 PM | Ancient species of assassin fly discovered by Smithsonian scientist
National Museum of Natural History scientist Torsten Dikow discovered and named a new species of assassin fly, Burmapogon bruckschi, after studying the first two specimens […] The post Ancient species of assassin fly discovered by Smithsonian scientist appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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3:00 PM | Meet The Chicken From Hell So have you heard of the chicken from...
Meet The Chicken From Hell So have you heard of the chicken from hell? It’s a new Dinosaur! via Animalist.

April 19, 2014

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2:35 PM | Happy Easter with a (fake) Dozen Dinosaur Eggs
Roy Chapman Andrews was not only an intrepid explorer and palaeontologist, but also a gifted promoter. The Central Asiatic Expeditions were accompanied by cameras to document the entire work. As the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:35 PM | Happy Easter with a (fake) Dozen Dinosaur Eggs
Roy Chapman Andrews was not only an intrepid explorer and palaeontologist, but also a gifted promoter. The Central Asiatic Expeditions were accompanied by cameras to document the entire work. As the conditions were most time prohibitive – relief from the burning sun was given only by frequent sandstorms – many scenes showing the discovery and [...]

April 17, 2014

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5:11 PM | Eat live termites for breakfast? Your ancestors might have!
Termites and ants are not something you’re likely to pour into a cereal bowl for breakfast or munch with toast and tea, but your ancient […] The post Eat live termites for breakfast? Your ancestors might have! appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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4:38 PM | Eocasea martini: Scientists Discover Oldest Known Ancestor of Land Herbivores
Eocasea martini, a carnivorous animal that lived in what is today Kansas during Carboniferous period, about 300 million years ago, is the oldest known ancestor of terrestrial herbivores, say paleontologists from the University of Toronto Mississauga. “The evolution of herbivory was revolutionary to life on land because it meant terrestrial vertebrates could directly access the [...]
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2:23 PM | Bony body tube for a bizarre marine reptile
Prehistoric marine reptiles were a weird lot, especially in light of their lizard-like ancestors on land. You take something that roughly looks like an iguana, and evolve it into the shape of a dolphin (icthyosaurs), or evolve it …The post Bony body tube for a bizarre marine reptile appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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12:17 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:17 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what about geology? There were some lone geniuses in the earth sciences – Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci (born April 15, 1452-1519) recognized fossils as petrified remains of former living [...]
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12:01 PM | Ozarcus mapesae: Fossil Species Reveals Sharks aren’t Living Fossils
Paleontologists from the American Museum of Natural History have described a shark species that lived during Carboniferous period, about 325 million years ago. The analysis of its fossilized skull shows that living sharks are actually quite advanced in evolutionary terms, despite having retained their basic ‘sharkiness’ over millions of years. “Sharks are traditionally thought to [...]
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2:18 AM | What is that? Wednesday: Realistic Dinosaurs
I’m a paleontologist. I’m a little selective about dinosaur toys… understandably. So when I saw this toy set at the drug store yesterday, I had to buy it – if only to protect unsuspecting children from buying it and thinking … Continue reading →

April 16, 2014

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9:00 PM | Tiny Carnivore Evolved Into Huge Vegetarians
Which came first: carnivores or herbivores? A newly discovered tiny meat eater answers that questions and more. Continue reading →
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1:33 PM | Doahugou Biota: Study Describes 30 Species from Jurassic of China
A new paper published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology describes 30 Jurassic creatures – five salamanders, one anuran, two lizards, 13 pterosaurs, five dinosaurs, and four mammals – of the so-called Daohugou Biota, a fossil assemblage named after a village near one of the major localities in Inner Mongolia, China. Over the last two [...]
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12:03 PM | Smithsonian Welcomes “Nation’s T. rex” to Washington, D.C.
On April 15 the National Museum of Natural History took delivery of a nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. Called the Nation’s T. rex, it will be the centerpiece of the […] The post Smithsonian Welcomes “Nation’s T. rex” to Washington, D.C. appeared first on Smithsonian Science.

April 12, 2014

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5:27 PM | Tar Pits Bees Connect California’s Past to the Present
The La Brea asphalt seeps are practically synonymous with megafauna. Sculptures of American lions and scrapping Smilodon draw …
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2:40 PM | The Lady Fossil Hunter Meet Mary Leakey, one of the...
The Lady Fossil Hunter Meet Mary Leakey, one of the world’s foremost paleontologists and archaeologists — and also a rare woman digging in the Olduvai Gorge dirt for the bones of human ancestors. via Stuff Mom Never Told You.

April 11, 2014

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4:53 PM | Prehistoric Harvestmen Had Two Pairs of Eyes
A 305-million-year-old fossil found in eastern France reveals that primitive harvestmen had two sets of eyes rather than one. Living harvestmen (Opiliones) – a group of arachnids more commonly known as daddy longlegs – have a single pair of eyes that help them navigate habitats in every continent except Antarctica. But the newly discovered Carboniferous [...]
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4:40 PM | The ‘Chicken from Hell’ Fowl-Looking Dinosaur The...
The ‘Chicken from Hell’ Fowl-Looking Dinosaur The bones of Anzu wyliei, called “the chicken from hell,” a large, bird-like dinosaur puzzled scientists for years…until now. Now, the fossil evidence of 3 partial skeletons is giving the researchers a clearer picture of what the clawed oviraptorosaurs looked like. Are people’s conceived ideas of how dinosaurs and ancient creatures looked completely wrong? Kim Horcher, Tim Frisch, and Andrew Fogel discuss. Read […]
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2:46 PM | Study Sheds Light on Life during Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition
A study led by Prof Luis Buatois from the University of Saskatchewan provides new evidence to understand the development of life at Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary times, about 540 million years ago. “During the Cambrian period the face of our planet changed forever and there are still many unanswered questions,” said Prof Buatois, who is the first [...]

April 10, 2014

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1:03 PM | Nimbacinus dicksoni: Australia’s Extinct Marsupial Hunted Large Prey
Nimbacinus dicksoni, an ancient meat-eating marsupial that lived in Australia during Oligocene and Miocene between 24 and 5.3 million years ago, had the ability to hunt vertebrate prey exceeding its own size. Commonly known as the Dickson’s thylacine, Nimbacinus dicksoni was a 50-cm-long fox-sized thylacine and a distant relative of the famous Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus [...]
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7:30 AM | Ice Age Leafcutter Bee Fossils At La Brea Tar Pits
The La Brea Tar Pits in California are known for saber-toothed cats and mastodons but they also have insects. Recent examination of fossil leafcutter bee nest cells, led by Anna Holden of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and colleagues, reveal insights into the habitat and climate at the La Brea Tar Pits toward the last Ice Age.  Holden conducted the study with bee specialists Jon B. Koch and Dr. Terry Griswold from Utah State University, paleobotanist Dr. Diane M. Erwin, from […]

April 09, 2014

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3:21 PM | 520-Million-Year-Old Fossil Reveals Oldest Known Cardiovascular System
Paleontologists from China, the United States and United Kingdom have discovered a 3-inch-long fossil of a prehistoric shrimp-like animal with the earliest known cardiovascular system. The fossil belongs to Fuxianhuia protensa, an extinct arthropod that lived in what is today Yunnan province in China during the Cambrian period, about 520 million years ago. “This is [...]

April 08, 2014

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9:39 PM | Old Photos Revive Dinosaur Chase
On the fourth floor of the American Museum of Natural History, hiding in plain sight, there is an …
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