Posts

October 21, 2014

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8:04 PM | Geologizing in the Realm of the Beast
September 8, 1762 the young son of the Yolle‘s, herding the flock of sheep, disappeared near the village of Laval in the province of Dauphiné (France). Only the poor remains of the boy, partially eaten by a mysterious creature, were recovered. The pastor of Laval, named Raphaël, later described an encounter with this creature: “the [...]

October 20, 2014

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9:20 PM | Scientists Have Identified the First Sex Act Performed on Earth
Scientists from Flinders University in Australia say they have identified the first example of penetrative sex in evolution. And wow, was it ever weird. Read more...

October 17, 2014

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6:42 PM | Brazil’s First Fossil Bird Egg Discovered
A near-intact fossilized egg of a Mesozoic bird recently discovered in the Sao Paulo State of Brazil is the first ever found in the country. The Mesozoic fossil record includes more than 120 species of birds found worldwide. Over the last three decades, paleontologists have made important discoveries of fossil bird eggs including those of [...]
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5:47 PM | Meet PLOS at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014
We are excited to announce that PLOS will be exhibiting at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014 Annual Meeting from 5-8th November in Berlin. This is only the second time that the meeting takes place outside North America, and the … Continue reading »The post Meet PLOS at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014 appeared first on EveryONE.
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5:38 PM | Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill...
Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill introduces Brian Switek to the paleontological quandary that is the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry’s bone bed, on the Paleo Trails! 75% carnivorous!?! 2/3rds Allosaurs!?! Whatever the stats, Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry = Christmas morning for paleontologists! For more on Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, check out their site: http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/price/recreation/quarry.html By: Dinologue.

October 16, 2014

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3:21 PM | Nautilus shell deformity puzzles scientists
By John Barrat In the wild, wide milk chocolate-brown stripes adorn the beautiful smooth, white shells of the chambered nautilus, a deep-diving mollusk from the […] The post Nautilus shell deformity puzzles scientists appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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1:20 PM | This Gigantic Ancient Kangaroo Didn't Hop — It Actually Walked
For millions of years there lived a rather large species of kangaroo in Australia called sthenurines. Weighing in at 550 pounds and featuring a 6'6" frame, these Pleistocene creatures must have been an awesome site — an animal made all the more remarkable by virtue of the fact that they walked around on their feet just like humans.Read more...
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12:30 PM | Warm Oceans Had Less Oxygen, Show Microfossils
By pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology, the study of tiny fossilized organisms, researchers believe they can decipher how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago.   The work revolves around the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a well-studied analogue for modern climate warming. Documenting the expansion of OMZs during the PETM is difficult because of the lack of a sensitive, widely applicable indicator of dissolved […]
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10:09 AM | Extinct Giant Kangaroos Walked Instead of Hopped
According to a study carried out by scientists from Spain and the United States, members of Sthenurinae – an ancient family of kangaroos that lived until 30,000 years ago – likely preferred walking to hopping. Sthenurinae (sthenurine kangaroos) was an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These short-faced, large-bodied ‘browsers’ first appeared [...]
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5:01 AM | Which (non-open access) journals can paleontologists access?
In a previous post, I detailed the various ways in which paleontologists access the non-open access literature. Institutional subscription was the most commonly-used method (but not for all people who answered a survey on the topic!), followed by accessing author-posted … Continue reading »The post Which (non-open access) journals can paleontologists access? appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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12:13 AM | SeAVP Day 2, Museum Hopping, and National Fossil Day!
Day 2 of SeAVP: Field trip day! Kat Turk, former VMNH intern, and I attended the field trip to Smith County Lime Pit, Sylvarena, MS. This quarry containing 4 Oligocene formations: Marianna, Byram, Glendon, and Bucatunna. The majority of the … Continue reading →

October 15, 2014

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8:26 PM | Watch ‘Scotty the T-Rex’ take shape at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
I love how Te Papa has been using Youtube to bring viewers a behind-the-scenes glimpse into their natural history work.  For instance, on September 16th they broadcast an examination of a Collossal […]
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1:43 PM | Five Points About The Fossil History of Echinoderms! Happy National Fossil Day!
Happy National Fossil Day!Every few years I'm in a position to share some more love about echinoderms and fossils. I've done this on previous National Fossil Days and tried to shed some light on the often arcane world of fossil echinoderms...Here's one on paleocology & fossil parasites..A nice gallery of fossil crinoids..   and this classic piece on giant floating/pelagic crinoids! Paleozoic Echinoderms: The Ophiocystioids!  and the Helicoplacoids! A LOT of the […]

October 14, 2014

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6:44 PM | Five amazing fossil finds that will make you want to be a fossil hunter
By Micaela Jemison What do you want to be when you grow up? Would you want to explore the world searching for long lost creatures […] The post Five amazing fossil finds that will make you want to be a fossil hunter appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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3:39 AM | Episode 207 – Drop Bears of South America
00:00:00 – Dr. Robert McAfee joins Ryan to discuss all things sloths! Finally, Ryan gets to just cut loose. First up on the docket, were giant ground sloths sneaking meat meals in between the leaves? There’s some evidence to suggest that they were, but do these two slothologists believe it? 00:29:29 – No good sloth discussion […]

October 11, 2014

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8:55 PM | Profile: Melanie Hopkins Dr. Melanie Hopkins is assistant...
Profile: Melanie Hopkins Dr. Melanie Hopkins is assistant curator in the Division of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History. Dr. Hopkins is working to unlock the history of the evolution of animals over vast stretches of geologic time. For her, the key is trilobites—extinct arthropods that lived for almost 300 million years until 250 million years ago, when Earth experienced the largest mass extinction in its history. Her research takes her out into the field but also […]
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8:05 PM | Lythronax - Part 2 on Paleo Profile - the T. rex Origin...
Lythronax - Part 2 on Paleo Profile - the T. rex Origin Story Curious to learn more about the T. rex origin story? Then press ‘play’ and Brian Switek will introduce you to Lythronax, who can be found hanging out at the Natural History Museum of Utah! Uploaded by: Dinologue.

October 10, 2014

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9:14 PM | Getting to the Root of Fur
First thing in the morning, my mind is on autopilot. I’m mostly relying on muscle memory to get …
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12:00 PM | New Book: A History of Life in 100 Fossils
Left-handed snails, giant wombats, spiny trilobites, zombie ants, glyptodonts…these are a few of the fascinating animals and plants whose fossils spring to life across the […] The post New Book: A History of Life in 100 Fossils appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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9:47 AM | Tachiraptor admirabilis: New Carnivorous Dinosaur Unearthed in Venezuela
Paleontologist Dr Oliver Rauhut of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany, and his colleagues have described a new dinosaur genus and species that lived in what is now Venezuela during the earliest part of the Jurassic period, about 201 million years ago. The newly-discovered dinosaur is a small bipedal theropod, with an estimated body length slightly [...]

October 09, 2014

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6:59 PM | What Was on the Early Mammal Menu?
Dinosaurs are great. Don’t get me wrong. But just as their bulk literally cast shade on many of …

October 08, 2014

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8:30 PM | Haunting Cave Paintings in Indonesia Are the Oldest in the World
This stencil of a graceful, outstretched hand was discovered in a cave on an Indonesian island. And now we know that it's more than 39,900 years old. That makes it the oldest painting in the world, at least so far, and shows that humans in Asia developed symbolic expression at the same time as humans in Europe.Read more...
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6:00 PM | Ancient “Oddball” Mammal Reshuffles Family Tree?
A mysterious mammal that waded through South Asian swamps 48 million years ago is a distant cousin of modern rhinoceroses and tapirs, a new study says.
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5:11 PM | How Dinosaurs Divided their Meals at the Jurassic Dinner Table
Sauropods were the largest land animals ever on earth, and many different species of them lived close together, so how did they all find enough food? New research from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, London can now answer this question.Mounted Apatosaurus at the Carnegie MuseumPhoto by Tadek KurpaskiSauropods, large, long-necked plant-eating dinosaurs such as Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, lived between 210 and 65 million years ago. The biggest weighed in at 80 […]
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12:30 PM | Jurassic Dining: How Giant Dinosaurs Shared Space
Sauropods,  large, long-necked plant-eating dinosaurs such as Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, are the largest animals to have ever walked the Earth, with the biggest weighing 80 tons. Clearly, a single creature the size of 11 elephants would have needed vast amounts of food. How did multiple sauropod species live alongside one another in prehistoric ecosystems between 210 and 65 million years ago? New research from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, […]
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12:00 AM | Dreaming of a World Full of Winged Dinosaurs
Imagine a Cretaceous forest, blazing with sunset, where the flying creatures settling down to sleep are four-winged Microraptors . It might look something like this.Read more...

October 07, 2014

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11:00 PM | Scrappy, Bloodthirsty Dino Found in Venezuela
Venezuela now has its first meat-loving dinosaur, a scrappy carnivore known as Thief of Tachira.
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11:00 PM | Scrappy, Bloodthirsty Dino Found in Venezuela
Venezuela now has its first meat-loving dinosaur, a scrappy carnivore known as Thief of Tachira.
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10:36 PM | Evolution in the Slow Lane
One late spring weekend a few years back, my wife and I drove out to Delaware to see …

October 06, 2014

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10:20 PM | The Real Top Predator of the Dinosaur Age Was Not T. Rex
Deinosuchus could snack on T. rex for dinner. That's how badass this ancient ancestor of the American alligator was. In this short video from Brian Switek, author of My Beloved Brontosaurus, you'll find out exactly how the perfect predator came to rule the swamps of Utah 75 million years ago.Read more...
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