Posts

September 19, 2014

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7:55 PM | New Dinosaur Rhinorex Raises Cretaceous Quandary
Rhinorex is an evocative name for a dinosaur. It sounds like a snarling theropod with a huge nasal …
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7:51 PM | They're Calling This New Species Of Hadrosaur The "King Nose"
Yes, it's got quite the schnoz — but you probably wouldn't want to mess with this giant herbivore. The recently identified species of hadrosaur measured some 30 feet long and weighed over 8,500 pounds.Read more...
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5:56 PM | Rhinorex condrupus: New Herbivorous Dinosaur Discovered in Utah
Paleontologists Dr Rodney Scheetz of Brigham Young University’s Museum of Paleontology and Dr Terry Gates of North Carolina State University and North Carolina Museum of Natural Science have described a new species of hadrosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Neslen Formation of central Utah. The new hadrosaur, scientifically named Rhinorex condrupus, lived during the Cretaceous period, [...]
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3:34 AM | Shields and Spears
I love when this group of Alaskan paleoartists has a show – I even have one of their past postcards framed and decorating my sons’ robot-and-dinosaur themed bedroom. Scott Elyard, Raven... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

September 18, 2014

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8:14 PM | How do paleontologists access the (non-open access) literature?
It is no secret to those who know me that I am strongly supportive of open access (OA)–published data and personal experience alike show that OA is strongly beneficial to science. That said, it’s not as if we can ignore …The post How do paleontologists access the (non-open access) literature? appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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4:42 PM | In Search Of… Darwin’s Cryptids
First bones of this mysterious creature were discovered in 1787 near Rio Lujàn (Argentinia), collected and send to Spain two years later. Zoologist Juan Bautista Bru de Ramon (1740-1799)... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:42 PM | In Search Of… Darwin’s Cryptids
First bones of this mysterious creature were discovered in 1787 near Rio Lujàn (Argentinia), collected and send to Spain two years later. Zoologist Juan Bautista Bru de Ramon (1740-1799) reconstructed the bones in 1795 as a mounted skeleton for the Real Gabinete de Historia Natural de Madrid, the royal cabinet of curiosities – the first [...]

September 17, 2014

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5:38 PM | Dino-Killing Chicxulub Asteroid Helped Plant Kingdom Bloom
According to a new study of fossilized leaves of angiosperms (flowering plants excluding conifers) published in the journal PLoS Biology, the massive asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs about 66 million years ago also boosted up fast-growing, deciduous plants. About 66 million years ago, a 10-km asteroid crashed into our planet near the site [...]
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12:29 AM | Bone From the Outside In
Our skeletons are made of bone. This is a fact so simple as to seem mundane. It’s easy …

September 16, 2014

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2:00 PM | Fossil Burrows Shed Light on Great Plains' Roots
The Great Plains didn't evolve in a vacuum. Ancient rodents helped shape the ecosystem we know today. Fossil burrows are helping scientists figure out how.

September 15, 2014

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10:59 PM | Spinosaurus appears to have been toothy and semi-aquatic; but don’t call it a crocoduck
Previously-known Spinosaurus was a dinosaur that blew my mind. I couldn’t figure out the deal with the sail and the ultra-long snout. Turns out it had more surprises in store. Scientists report first semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus: Massive predator was more than 9 feet longer than largest T. rex — ScienceDaily. Scientists today unveiled what appears… Source: Doubtful News
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8:48 PM | A Mosasaur’s Last Meal
Look into the jaws of a Mosasaurus and you will gaze into a nightmare. The seagoing lizard’s curved …
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7:29 PM | 19-Million-Year-Old Hippo-Like Animal Named after Mick Jagger
Paleontologists from the United States and Egypt have described a new species of anthracothere that lived in Africa during Miocene, 19 million years ago, and named it after Sir Mick Jagger, the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both share – their supersized lips. The prehistoric animal, Jaggermeryx naida (means Jagger’s water [...]
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12:00 PM | Pterosaurs by Mark Witton
Pterosaurs: Natural History, Evolution, Anatomy by Mark P. Witton is a coffee-table size book rich in detail and lavishly illustrated. Witton is a pterosaur expert at the School of Earh and Environmental Sciences at the University of Portsmouth. He is famous for his illustrations and his work in popular media such as the film “Walking…

September 14, 2014

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2:37 PM | The Figure Makes the Fossil
As I wrap up revisions on a manuscript, as well as continuing the day to day work in “my” museum collection, I’ve been thinking a lot about what makes a good figure of a fossil. The thought is driven in …The post The Figure Makes the Fossil appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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10:09 AM | Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast
The German naturalist F. W. H. Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769-1859) is remembered as great geographer and explorer (maybe his name is even the most common on topographic maps), but... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:09 AM | Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast
The German naturalist F. W. H. Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769-1859) is remembered as great geographer and explorer (maybe his name is even the most common on topographic maps), but his early education focused on mining engineering (and economy, as wished by his mother) and he made some important contributions to geology, for [...]

September 13, 2014

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6:12 PM | Ikrandraco: Newly-Discovered Pterosaur Named after Dragons from Avatar Movie
An international team of paleontologists has described a new species of flying reptile that lived in what is now China during the Cretaceous period, about 120 millions years ago, and named it after the flying dragon-like creatures from director James Cameron’s blockbuster 2009 movie Avatar. Two specimens of the new pterosaur, Ikrandraco avatar (means ‘Ikran [...]

September 12, 2014

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7:51 PM | Friday Headlines: 9-12-14
Friday Headlines, September 12, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Parts of I-15 in Nevada destroyed by flooding! The oldest mammal? Exfoliation (in the geologic sense) caught on camera!   I-15 partially open from St. George to … Continue reading →
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7:32 PM | Spinosaurus aegyptiacus: Paleontologists Unveil First Semiaquatic Dinosaur
Newly-discovered 95-million-year-old fossils of the carnivorous dinosaur Spinosaurus aegyptiacus are the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment, according to an international team of paleontologists headed by Dr Dawid Iurino of the Sapienza Universita di Roma, Italy. The remains also indicate that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus was the [...]

September 11, 2014

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10:40 PM | They Ate Sharks And Were Fifty Feet Long
This image of the gigantic dinosaur Spinosaurus, from Dinosaur Planet, is only half-right. New research shows that these massive, sailbacked animals probably didn't rear up on their hind legs much. But they did spend most of their time in the water, engaging in badass battles with sharks.Read more...
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9:33 PM | Before Whale Falls, There Were Ichthyosaur Falls
When a whale dies out in the open ocean, its body slowly drifts to the seafloor , where it breathes life into a temporary ecosystem. But whales weren't the first ones to live on after death; Jurassic giants did too.Read more...
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8:06 PM | Giant Semiaquatic Predatory Dinosaur
It is called Spinosaurus aegyptiacus but it sounds a bit more like Godzilla. Spinosaurus is a theropod dinosaur (that’s the groups birds evolved within) found in what is now NOrth Africa, between about 112 and 97 million years ago. It was first discovered about one century ago, though those bones were destroyed during WW II.…
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7:36 PM | Spinosaurus: The First Semi-Aquatic Dinosaur
The first truly semi-aquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, has been announced. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment. The fossils also indicate that Spinosaurus was the largest known predatory dinosaur to roam the Earth, measuring more than 9 feet longer than the world's largest Tyrannosaurus rex […]
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7:14 PM | The New Spinosaurus
Spinosaurus has changed dramatically since I was a kid. The model I used to terrorize my other toys …
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7:00 PM | Predatory dinosaur was larger than T. rex, went for swims
Skeleton of a semi-aquatic predator completes a story interrupted by bombs in WWII.
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6:56 PM | New Fossils Push Back The Origin Of Mammals By Millions Of Years
A controversial new analysis of the fossilized remains of six squirrel-sized animals has pushed the lineage of modern mammals back to the Late Triassic — a time when the first dinosaurs emerged. The research also suggests that early mammals didn't just hide in the undergrowth.Read more...
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5:33 PM | Huaridelphis raimondii: New Miocene Species of Dolphin Discovered in Peru
Peruvian and European paleontologists have described a new fossil species of dolphin that lived in what is now Peru during the Miocene period, about 16 million years ago. The new species, named Huaridelphis raimondii, belongs to Squalodelphinidae, a rare extinct family of marine dolphins, which are related to the extant Ganges and Indus river dolphins. [...]
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3:00 PM | Synapsid Sunrise
With hues inspired by calcite and a plastic toy dimetrodon sitting as a model, Sharon Wegner-Larsen created this stunning watercolour and ink work, Synapsid Sunrise. The paint is warm and reminiscent... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:30 PM | Life On Earth Still Favors Evolution Over Creationism
Evolution is still the favored theory, according to fossil records. Credit: Flickr/Brent Danley, CC BY-NC-SABy John Long, Flinders University read more
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