Posts

October 24, 2014

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4:00 PM | Oldest Modern Genome From Human Bone Reveals When We Bred With Neanderthals
The femur that led to the oldest modern human genome. Credit: Bence Viola, MPI EVABy Daniel Zadik, University of LeicesterWhen a human bone was found on a gravelly riverbank by a bone-carver who was searching for mammoth ivory, little did he know it would provide the oldest modern-human genome yet sequenced. The anatomically modern male thigh-bone, found near the town of Ust’-Ishim in south-western Siberia, has been radiocarbon-dated to around 45,000 years old. read more

October 23, 2014

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10:39 PM | Now we know where these weirdo arms belonged
For almost 50 years, paleontologists had a mystery set of giant dinosaur arms. The rest of the animal has now been discovered… and his arms have been put back on. Mystery of dinosaur with giant arms solved. In the 1960s, researchers unearthed two gigantic dinosaur arms. For decades, scientists have speculated about what kind of… Source: Doubtful News
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9:30 PM | The world's oldest genome shows when our ancestors had sex with Neanderthals.
The world's oldest genome shows when our ancestors had sex with Neanderthals. Analysis of a 45,000 year-old femur shows that modern humans and Neanderthals mated 52,000 to 58,000 years ago — a much smaller window than previously estimated (a 49,000 year span). It's the oldest-known human genome ever sequenced, revealing a mysterious population that once spanned northern Asia. Read more...
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8:49 PM | Dinosaur Noses Are Cool
Nearly a century ago, while working in the 75 million year old rock of Alberta, Canada, the professional …
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8:05 PM | Depositional Environments on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill...
Depositional Environments on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill explains depositional environments to Brian Switek at Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry. For more on Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, check out their site: http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/price/recreation/quarry.html By: Dinologue.
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8:00 PM | Finally Found: The Body That Goes With These Monstrous Dinosaur Arms
In 1965, paleontologists unearthed a ghastly pair of eight-foot, claw-tipped dinosaur arms – and little else. Since then, researchers have been searching for the rest of Deinocheirus mirificus (Latin for "unusual, horrible hands"). Now, a team working in Mongolia has found it.Read more...
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7:33 PM | Deinocheirus Mirificus Puzzle Solved, Revealing The Weirdest-Looking Creature To Walk The Planet
Deinocheirus mirificus. Credit: Yuong-Nam LeeBy Stephen Brusatte, University of EdinburghEverywhere scientists look it seems like they are finding dinosaurs. A new species is emerging at the astounding pace of one per week. And this continues with the announcement of perhaps the strangest dinosaur find over the past few years: the toothless, hump-backed, super-clawed omnivore Deinocheirus mirificus that lived about 70m years ago in what is now Mongolia. read more
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3:30 PM | Bizarre dinosaur matched to an enormous set of arm bones
50 years after arms were found, we have a very odd looking body to go with them.
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11:14 AM | New Fossils Help Reconstruct Bizarre Ostrich-Like Dinosaur
A large duck-billed dinosaur with a camel-like hump and the neck of an ostrich lived in what is today Mongolia during the Cretaceous, about 70 million years ago, say Dr Tsogtbaatar Chinzorig of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences’ Paleontological Center and his colleagues who analyzed and pieced together dinosaur fossils recently uncovered in the Gobi [...]
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3:35 AM | Why Are the Paleos Talking About Laundry?
I think I just had one of the more entertaining Twitter conversations ever. I have to share. It started with me whining a bit, because I can: I really ought to do some laundry. Only I don’t want to. — … Continue reading →

October 22, 2014

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11:10 PM | 45,000-year-old modern human bone yields a genome
Places Neanderthal interbreeding at 60,000 years.

October 21, 2014

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11:14 PM | Sex? Sex? Oh, please. It's copulation.
In higher organisms, sex, gender, and copulation are all neatly tied up together such that to the less well informed (read science correspondent) they are one and the same. So when some science reporter says "Sex emerged in an ancient Scottish lake", and it turns out to be fossil fish copulating, it just sends the wrong message.  To be fair it's the headline that's wrong. The article clearly states this is about copulation. Sex is when parents of two different genotypes combine […]
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8:04 PM | Geologizing in the Realm of the Beast
September 8, 1762 the young son of the Yolle‘s, herding the flock of sheep, disappeared near the village of Laval in the province of Dauphiné (France). Only the poor remains of the boy, partially eaten by a mysterious creature, were recovered. The pastor of Laval, named Raphaël, later described an encounter with this creature: “the [...]
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8:04 PM | Geologizing in the Realm of the Beast
September 8, 1762 the young son of the Yolle‘s, herding the flock of sheep, disappeared near the village of Laval in the province of Dauphiné (France). Only the poor remains of the boy,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 20, 2014

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9:20 PM | Scientists Have Identified the First Sex Act Performed on Earth
Scientists from Flinders University in Australia say they have identified the first example of penetrative sex in evolution. And wow, was it ever weird. Read more...

October 17, 2014

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6:42 PM | Brazil’s First Fossil Bird Egg Discovered
A near-intact fossilized egg of a Mesozoic bird recently discovered in the Sao Paulo State of Brazil is the first ever found in the country. The Mesozoic fossil record includes more than 120 species of birds found worldwide. Over the last three decades, paleontologists have made important discoveries of fossil bird eggs including those of [...]
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5:47 PM | Meet PLOS at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014
We are excited to announce that PLOS will be exhibiting at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014 Annual Meeting from 5-8th November in Berlin. This is only the second time that the meeting takes place outside North America, and the … Continue reading »The post Meet PLOS at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2014 appeared first on EveryONE.
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5:38 PM | Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill...
Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry on the Paleo Trails Mary Brill introduces Brian Switek to the paleontological quandary that is the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry’s bone bed, on the Paleo Trails! 75% carnivorous!?! 2/3rds Allosaurs!?! Whatever the stats, Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry = Christmas morning for paleontologists! For more on Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, check out their site: http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/price/recreation/quarry.html By: Dinologue.

October 16, 2014

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3:21 PM | Nautilus shell deformity puzzles scientists
By John Barrat In the wild, wide milk chocolate-brown stripes adorn the beautiful smooth, white shells of the chambered nautilus, a deep-diving mollusk from the […] The post Nautilus shell deformity puzzles scientists appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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1:20 PM | This Gigantic Ancient Kangaroo Didn't Hop — It Actually Walked
For millions of years there lived a rather large species of kangaroo in Australia called sthenurines. Weighing in at 550 pounds and featuring a 6'6" frame, these Pleistocene creatures must have been an awesome site — an animal made all the more remarkable by virtue of the fact that they walked around on their feet just like humans.Read more...
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12:30 PM | Warm Oceans Had Less Oxygen, Show Microfossils
By pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology, the study of tiny fossilized organisms, researchers believe they can decipher how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago.   The work revolves around the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a well-studied analogue for modern climate warming. Documenting the expansion of OMZs during the PETM is difficult because of the lack of a sensitive, widely applicable indicator of dissolved […]
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10:09 AM | Extinct Giant Kangaroos Walked Instead of Hopped
According to a study carried out by scientists from Spain and the United States, members of Sthenurinae – an ancient family of kangaroos that lived until 30,000 years ago – likely preferred walking to hopping. Sthenurinae (sthenurine kangaroos) was an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These short-faced, large-bodied ‘browsers’ first appeared [...]
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5:01 AM | Which (non-open access) journals can paleontologists access?
In a previous post, I detailed the various ways in which paleontologists access the non-open access literature. Institutional subscription was the most commonly-used method (but not for all people who answered a survey on the topic!), followed by accessing author-posted … Continue reading »The post Which (non-open access) journals can paleontologists access? appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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12:13 AM | SeAVP Day 2, Museum Hopping, and National Fossil Day!
Day 2 of SeAVP: Field trip day! Kat Turk, former VMNH intern, and I attended the field trip to Smith County Lime Pit, Sylvarena, MS. This quarry containing 4 Oligocene formations: Marianna, Byram, Glendon, and Bucatunna. The majority of the … Continue reading →

October 15, 2014

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8:26 PM | Watch ‘Scotty the T-Rex’ take shape at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
I love how Te Papa has been using Youtube to bring viewers a behind-the-scenes glimpse into their natural history work.  For instance, on September 16th they broadcast an examination of a Collossal […]
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1:43 PM | Five Points About The Fossil History of Echinoderms! Happy National Fossil Day!
Happy National Fossil Day!Every few years I'm in a position to share some more love about echinoderms and fossils. I've done this on previous National Fossil Days and tried to shed some light on the often arcane world of fossil echinoderms...Here's one on paleocology & fossil parasites..A nice gallery of fossil crinoids..   and this classic piece on giant floating/pelagic crinoids! Paleozoic Echinoderms: The Ophiocystioids!  and the Helicoplacoids! A LOT of the […]

October 14, 2014

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6:44 PM | Five amazing fossil finds that will make you want to be a fossil hunter
By Micaela Jemison What do you want to be when you grow up? Would you want to explore the world searching for long lost creatures […] The post Five amazing fossil finds that will make you want to be a fossil hunter appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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3:39 AM | Episode 207 – Drop Bears of South America
00:00:00 – Dr. Robert McAfee joins Ryan to discuss all things sloths! Finally, Ryan gets to just cut loose. First up on the docket, were giant ground sloths sneaking meat meals in between the leaves? There’s some evidence to suggest that they were, but do these two slothologists believe it? 00:29:29 – No good sloth discussion […]

October 11, 2014

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8:55 PM | Profile: Melanie Hopkins Dr. Melanie Hopkins is assistant...
Profile: Melanie Hopkins Dr. Melanie Hopkins is assistant curator in the Division of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History. Dr. Hopkins is working to unlock the history of the evolution of animals over vast stretches of geologic time. For her, the key is trilobites—extinct arthropods that lived for almost 300 million years until 250 million years ago, when Earth experienced the largest mass extinction in its history. Her research takes her out into the field but also […]
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8:05 PM | Lythronax - Part 2 on Paleo Profile - the T. rex Origin...
Lythronax - Part 2 on Paleo Profile - the T. rex Origin Story Curious to learn more about the T. rex origin story? Then press ‘play’ and Brian Switek will introduce you to Lythronax, who can be found hanging out at the Natural History Museum of Utah! Uploaded by: Dinologue.
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