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Posts

April 24, 2014

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12:34 AM | Are Brains of Artists Different?
With more and more brain imaging studies in the media, relating to different areas of human behavior including being creative, it is worth noting there are critiques of the validity and meaning of imaging technology. The image is from an article whose authors comment, “The brain is said to be the final scientific frontier, and […]

April 23, 2014

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8:30 PM | Your Brain is Plastic Hank explains the gift that your brain...
Your Brain is Plastic Hank explains the gift that your brain gives you every day: the gift of neural plasticity — the ways in which your brain actually changes at the cellular level as you learn. via SciShow. Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com
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6:05 PM | David Frim, MD, to receive Gary Lichtenstein Humanitarian Award
David Frim, MD, Chief of the Section of Neurosurgery, will receive the second Gary Lichtenstein Humanitarian Award on May, 4.
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5:43 PM | A chance to support research on Parkinson's Disease
The scientist known as @parklifensci (Parklife blog) on the Internet will be walking in the Parkinson's Unity Walk. The donation page says: Why I'm walking: Every walker and donor makes a difference by taking the Walk one step closer to finding the cause and cure for Parkinson’s. By joining together with thousands of others, we'll […]
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5:20 PM | Human Neural Stem Cells Transplanted Into Primate Brains Survive Long-Term - And Differentiate
Researchers have transplanted human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the brains of nonhuman primates and assessed cell survival and differentiation. The results: After 22 and 24 months the neural stem cells had differentiated into neurons and did not cause tumors.read more
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4:00 PM | What Happens When I Have A Hangover? If you’ve ever had a...
What Happens When I Have A Hangover? If you’ve ever had a few too many beers at a party, then you’ve probably encountered the symptoms of a hangover — the pulsing headache, dry mouth, nausea and more. But what’s actually happening to you? And what is it about alcohol that can turn a wonderful Saturday night into an agonizing Sunday morning? Learn more with Ben Bowlin. via Brain Stuff.
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4:00 PM | How To Do The Moonwalk
Walking around in the real world, as opposed to the uncluttered hallways of your school, requires flexible and adaptive fine-tuning of the basic alternating stepping pattern of our two legs. For animals to walk, central pattern generators (CPGs) must be modulated to allow different stride lengths in each leg or different swing heights to step … Continue reading →

Bidaye S.S., Machacek C., Wu Y. & Dickson B.J. (2014). Neuronal Control of Drosophila Walking Direction, Science, 344 (6179) 97-101. DOI:

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3:00 PM | Sleep: Men vs. Women Men tend to need less sleep than women, but...
Sleep: Men vs. Women Men tend to need less sleep than women, but insomnia affects more women. What gives? Cristen explores the science how biological sex interacts with sleep. via Stuff Mom Never Told You.
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2:00 PM | Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab
Psychologists and neurologists have been interested in the problem of free will since the beginning of their specialities, though the first clearly devised and relevant […] Read more The post Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Je ne regrette rien (1): On the neuropsychology of free will Mapping areas involved in voluntary forgetting is not simple... it is double! Reinforcement learning in the brain

Filevich E., Kühn S., Haggard P. & Pourtois G. (2013). There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit, PLoS ONE, 8 (2) e53053. DOI:

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2:00 PM | Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab
Psychologists and neurologists have been interested in the problem of free will since the beginning of their specialities, though the first clearly devised and relevant […] Read more The post Je ne regrette rien (2): Consciuous decisions in the lab appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Je ne regrette rien (1): On the neuropsychology of free will Mapping areas involved in voluntary forgetting is not simple... it is double! Reinforcement learning in the brain

Filevich E., Kühn S., Haggard P. & Pourtois G. (2013). There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit, PLoS ONE, 8 (2) e53053. DOI:

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12:30 PM | Feeling Hands With Electricity Helping prosthetic patients...
Feeling Hands With Electricity Helping prosthetic patients “feel” more naturally. More information at http://www.insidescience.org/content/feeling-hands-electricity/1595 via Inside Science TV.
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12:00 PM | Michio Kaku on the Evolution of Intelligence Dr. Michio Kaku...
Michio Kaku on the Evolution of Intelligence Dr. Michio Kaku returns to Big Think studios to discuss his latest book, The Future of the Mind (http://goo.gl/1mcGeb). Here he explains the evolution of human intelligence. via Big Think.
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10:48 AM | Why are some syllables preferred?
 In a recent paper by Berent and others (citation below) they investigate language universals in syllable structure. Their argument goes: there is a preference for certain syllables over others across languages and even in people whose language does not include those syllables; a set of four syllables which do not occur in English shows this […]

Berent, I., Pan, H., Zhao, X., Epstein, J., Bennett, M., Deshpande, V., Seethamraju, R. & Stern, E. (2014). Language Universals Engage Broca's Area, PLoS ONE, 9 (4) DOI:

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2:23 AM | Autism, SSRIs, and Epidemiology 101
I can understand the eagerness with which science writers jump on stories that deal with new findings about autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). After all, the mystery surrounding the rapid increase in ASD rates over the past 20 years (see right) has made any ASD-related study that may offer some clues inherently interesting. Because people are anxiously awaiting some explanation of this medical enigma, it seems like science writers almost have an obligation to discuss new findings concerning the […]

Rebecca A. Harrington, Li-Ching Lee, Rosa M. Crum, Andrew W. Zimmerman, Irva Hertz-Picciotto (2014). Prenatal SSRI Use and Offspring With Autism Spectrum Disorder or Developmental Delay, PEDIATRICS, DOI:

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April 22, 2014

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8:02 PM | Alzheimer’s disease is a growing health problem in many...
Alzheimer’s disease is a growing health problem in many nations, and many in the biosciences now work towards a treatment for the disease. Much like its precise molecular mechanism however, these treatments remain elusive. β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides grab hold of each other to assemble oligomers of various sizes in solution which aggregate into the large fibrils seen in plaques. Difficulties and ambiguities in the molecules’ structures at this level hinder the development of […]
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8:01 PM | How to Beat Jet Lag via braincraft: NEW VIDEO!! Want to beat jet...
How to Beat Jet Lag via braincraft: NEW VIDEO!! Want to beat jet lag quickly? There’s an app for that! I chat with researcher & app developer Olivia Walch from University of Michigan. Google+ https://www.google.com/+braincraftvideo Tumblr http://braincraft.tumblr.com Twitter https://twitter.com/Brain_Craft Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Braincraft Instagram http://instagram.com/brain_craft
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4:30 PM | Vaccines Do NOT Cause Autism! What Does? Everyone loves a good...
Vaccines Do NOT Cause Autism! What Does? Everyone loves a good conspiracy theory! Even if you don’t believe one, it can still be interesting to learn about. However, sometimes it can lead to some harmful misinformation. Join Trace as he talks about conspiracy theories in the medical world and why they can be harmful for adults and children. via DNews Channel.
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4:00 PM | Alzheimer’s? Forget about it!
Let’s face it, diseases that affect the brain are some of the hardest to deal with. Anyone who’s lost someone to alzheimer’s knows exactly what I am talking about. Looking […]

Acharya S., Safaie B.M., Wongkongkathep P., Ivanova M.I., Attar A., Klarner F.G., Schrader T., Loo J.A., Bitan G. & Lapidus L.J. & (2014). Molecular Basis for Preventing  α-synuclein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer, Journal of Biological Chemistry, 289 (15) 10727-10737. DOI:

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4:00 PM | Alzheimer’s? Forget about it!
Let’s face it, diseases that affect the brain are some of the hardest to deal with. Anyone who’s lost someone to alzheimer’s knows exactly what I am talking about. Looking […]

Acharya S., Safaie B.M., Wongkongkathep P., Ivanova M.I., Attar A., Klarner F.G., Schrader T., Loo J.A., Bitan G. & Lapidus L.J. & (2014). Molecular Basis for Preventing  α-synuclein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer, Journal of Biological Chemistry, 289 (15) 10727-10737. DOI:

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12:17 PM | Motivated Memory
I have had the following experience many times, and so I suspect that it is a near-universal experience. You are in a heated conversation with one or more other people who have differing opinions on the topic of discussion. Perhaps it’s just a fight over personal matters. After the heat has died down and calmer [...]
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12:01 PM | Ask Peggy Mason Anything!
Join Peggy Mason, PhD, professor of neurobiology on Reddit as she answers questions about empathy in rats, her massively open online course in neuroscience and neuro-evangelism.

April 21, 2014

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10:56 PM | The Neuroscience of Focus: Taking Back Control of Our Minds
Scientists John Gaspar and John McDonald from Simon Fraser University in British Columbia have recently discovered that we have an anti-distraction mode in our brain (See an overview here or the actual study here). This means that focusing on what matters moment-to-moment is not only about intentionally paying attention to something, like reading this blog post […]
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8:38 PM | Developing Gain Control in Single Cortical Neurons
If you are reading this sentence, it is quite likely that you have heard of “gain control” in a neuroscience context. You may notice that the picture provided above has very little to do with the context in which this blog post shall discuss “gain control”. You may also notice that this blog post has […]

Mease R.A., Famulare M., Gjorgjieva J., Moody W.J. & Fairhall A.L. (2013). Emergence of Adaptive Computation by Single Neurons in the Developing Cortex, Journal of Neuroscience, 33 (30) 12154-12170. DOI:

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4:35 PM | Here’s rionhunter's response, I've added my take on this...
Here’s rionhunter's response, I've added my take on this below: I made a response to this, but unfortunately, tumblr has a way of eating up anything more than 10 lines long, and it got a little lost.  So, even though I’m not Hank, I thought I would make a full post explaining the science.  To understand why it’s happening, though, I’m going to have to quickly explain to you what is happening first.Hopefully we all know that animation (and film) is just a […]
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2:00 PM | What Do Preschoolers Learn from Fantastical Picture Books?
One of the new picture books making the bedtime rounds at our house is How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight?, which describes and depicts dinosaurs doing such un-dinosaurly things as tucking themselves into bed or kissing their human mothers good night. … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Peas or carrots: Evidence-based education programs targeting stress and attention
I’m always keen to hear how scientists are able to reach out to their communities, whether it is by talking to young students about research opportunities, by tutoring or teaching, or by taking steps outside the lab to make direct links between research and the community. At this year’s meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS), one of […]

April 20, 2014

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5:00 PM | New Discovery turns Neuroscience Upsidedown
Sometimes finding out that something established isn’t true is more groundbreaking than finding something new. That is exactly what happened this week when it was found out that the covering that […]

Tomassy G.S., Berger D.R., Chen H.H., Kasthuri N., Hayworth K.J., Vercelli A., Seung H.S., Lichtman J.W. & Arlotta P. (2014). Distinct Profiles of Myelin Distribution Along Single Axons of Pyramidal Neurons in the Neocortex, Science, 344 (6181) 319-324. DOI:

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5:00 PM | New Discovery turns Neuroscience Upsidedown
Sometimes finding out that something established isn’t true is more groundbreaking than finding something new. That is exactly what happened this week when it was found out that the covering that […]

Tomassy G.S., Berger D.R., Chen H.H., Kasthuri N., Hayworth K.J., Vercelli A., Seung H.S., Lichtman J.W. & Arlotta P. (2014). Distinct Profiles of Myelin Distribution Along Single Axons of Pyramidal Neurons in the Neocortex, Science, 344 (6181) 319-324. DOI:

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5:00 PM | New Discovery turns Neuroscience Upsidedown
Sometimes finding out that something established isn’t true is more groundbreaking than finding something new. That is exactly what happened this week when it was found out that the covering that […]

Tomassy G.S., Berger D.R., Chen H.H., Kasthuri N., Hayworth K.J., Vercelli A., Seung H.S., Lichtman J.W. & Arlotta P. (2014). Distinct Profiles of Myelin Distribution Along Single Axons of Pyramidal Neurons in the Neocortex, Science, 344 (6181) 319-324. DOI:

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1:04 PM | Happy #420 folks! Here's a #drawing of the #brain and #weed. #sciart #neuroscience #Science #art
via Instagram http://ift.tt/1r3EIy4
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