X

Posts

April 18, 2014

+
4:45 PM | New Science Publication from Sebastian Seung Finds Variation in Axonal Myelination
A new publication from Seung Lab (coauthored by Sebastian Seung and former lab member Daniel Berger) is out today in Science. Daniel found that individual neurons have variations in axonal myelin (insulation) where often long “myelinated sections are interspersed with long, unmyelinated tracts.” Myelin distribution is an “integral feature of …
+
2:40 AM | Dear CNRS: That mouse study did not "confirm" the neurobiological origin of ADHD in humans
Late last week the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS - the acronym is based on the French translation) put out a press release describing a study conducted through a collaboration between several of its researchers and scientists from The University of Strasbourg. CNRS is a large (30,000+ employees), government-run research institution in France. It is the largest research organization in Europe, and is responsible for about 1/2 of the French scientific papers published […]

Mathis, C., Savier, E., Bott, J., Clesse, D., Bevins, N., Sage-Ciocca, D., Geiger, K., Gillet, A., Laux-Biehlmann, A., Goumon, Y. & Lacaud, A. (2014). Defective response inhibition and collicular noradrenaline enrichment in mice with duplicated retinotopic map in the superior colliculus, Brain Structure and Function, DOI:

Citation

April 17, 2014

+
4:42 PM | Tourette Syndrome - Brain Training Overcomes Tics In Study
Children with Tourette syndrome may unconsciously train their brain to more effectively control their tics.How so? A recent study found that teenagers diagnosed with  Tourette syndrome   were slower than typical peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets but buterr when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. They were as fast as their peers but made fewer eye movements […]
+
2:11 PM | Predicting Recovery from Coma
I have been following the literature on using newer technologies (PET, fMRI, and quantitative EEG) to evaluate the brain activity of patients who appear unresponsive, loosely referred to as coma, or more generally disorders of consciousness. A new study, which I will get to below, adds an interesting element to the research. For background, disorders [...]

April 16, 2014

+
2:56 PM | Memory trace formation caught in the act?
I want to discuss a very interesting new paper from Jim Knierim’s group at Johns Hopkins, which has the potential to be a major advance in our understanding of episodic memory.  It also perhaps is the beginning of an answer to a question that has been in my mind for 20 years. The paper is: … Continue reading »
+
2:00 PM | 2D brain mapping: gene expression and spatial location
Let’s try a little game. If I’d show you only parts of a famous building: a column, part of a wall, the ceiling…Would you be […] Read more The post 2D brain mapping: gene expression and spatial location appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:The (energetical) cost of having a brain Mapping areas involved in voluntary forgetting is not simple... it is double! Reinforcement learning in the brain

Grange P., Bohland J.W., Okaty B.W., Sugino K., Bokil H., Nelson S.B., Ng L., Hawrylycz M. & Mitra P.P. (2014). Cell-type-based model explaining coexpression patterns of genes in the brain, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111 (14) 5397-5402. DOI:

Citation
+
7:42 AM | Q&A on dynamic documents
At GigaScience one of our major goals is to take the scientific publishing beyond dead trees and static PDFs to a more dynamic and interactive process, much like science itself has embraced the Internet to become more networked and data driven. One way we have done this is by enabling the histories and analyses from papers to be visualized and executed through our GigaGalaxy server (see our recent posting on this), but on top of integrating workflows into our papers through citable DOIs, the […]

April 15, 2014

+
11:00 PM | In Deaf People, The Language They Learned As Kids Affected Brain Structure
People who are deaf and those with hearing differ in brain anatomy, no surprise in that. But studies of individuals who are deaf and use American Sign Language (ASL) from birth aren't telling the whole science story. 95 percent of the deaf population in America is born to hearing parents and use English or another spoken language as their first language, usually through lip-reading. Since both language and audition are housed in nearby locations in the brain, understanding which differences […]
+
4:30 PM | Can You Have A Brain Orgasm? There’s a weird phenomenon...
Can You Have A Brain Orgasm? There’s a weird phenomenon here on YouTube called ASMR. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response creates a tingly and calming sensation, and no one knows why! Laci takes a look at a recent study to shed some light on the mystery behind these videos. via DNews Channel.
+
12:00 PM | Videos: A (Very) Close Look Inside the Zebrafish Brain
About a year ago I wrote a story about the hottest new animal model in neuroscience: baby zebrafish. …
+
8:00 AM | Consciousness as Social Perception (BSP 108)
Michal Graziano and Kevin (click image to play interview) In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is […]

April 14, 2014

+
11:28 PM | ApoE4 Gene Variant Linked To Higher Risk Of Alzheimer's In Women
Women who carry a copy of a gene variant called ApoE4 have substantially greater risk for Alzheimer's disease than men,according to an analysis of data on large numbers of older individuals who were tracked over time and noting whether they had progressed from good health to mild cognitive impairment — from which most move on to develop Alzheimer's disease within a few years — or to Alzheimer's disease itself.read more
+
3:42 PM | The Molecular Future of Neurosurgery
A recent symposium delved into how neurosurgeons plan to move beyond scalpels and steel to treating brain conditions with viruses, genes and proteins.
+
2:00 PM | Phonology and the brain: it’s all in the features.
…and the vision that was planted in my brain still remains, . within the sound of silence. . (Simon and Garfunkel, The sound of silence 1964) […] Read more The post Phonology and the brain: it’s all in the features. appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Sesame Street and brain activity in children Reinforcement learning in the brain The (energetical) cost of having a brain

Mesgarani N., Cheung C., Johnson K. & Chang E.F. (2014). Phonetic Feature Encoding in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus, Science, 343 (6174) 1006-1010. DOI:

Citation

April 13, 2014

+
6:00 PM | Crystal Dilworth: Ballet, Neuroscience and a Man-Eating...
Crystal Dilworth: Ballet, Neuroscience and a Man-Eating Plant Crystal Dilworth doesn’t “run away to join the circus,” but then she kind of does… with other scientists. Crystal Dilworth recently completed her Ph.D. in Molecular Neuroscience at Cal Tech. Her research has focused on the molecular basis for nicotine dependence. An accomplished life-long dancer, Crystal now choreographs Cal Tech’s musical productions. That’s right, she teaches other scientists to […]
+
2:18 AM | Early brain development and heat shock proteins
The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal […]

Hashimoto-Torii, K., Torii, M., Fujimoto, M., Nakai, A., El Fatimy, R., Mezger, V., Ju, M., Ishii, S., Chao, S., Brennand, K. & Gage, F. (2014). Roles of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Neuronal Response to Fetal Environmental Risks and Its Relevance to Brain Disorders, Neuron, DOI:

Citation
+
2:18 AM | Early brain development and heat shock proteins
The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal […]

Hashimoto-Torii, K., Torii, M., Fujimoto, M., Nakai, A., El Fatimy, R., Mezger, V., Ju, M., Ishii, S., Chao, S., Brennand, K. & Gage, F. (2014). Roles of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Neuronal Response to Fetal Environmental Risks and Its Relevance to Brain Disorders, Neuron, DOI:

Citation

April 12, 2014

+
3:07 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 11/04/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
3:07 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 11/04/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
8:03 AM | The Stuff of Brains
That migraine I was waiting for finally struck this week. Amazingly it didn’t throw my life into disarray, because it hit me during a week I was supposed to be having ‘off’. Consequently it only spoiled a day of relaxation, … Continue reading →

April 11, 2014

+
8:46 PM | LabBook April 11, 2014
A protein named Tim, Your Inner Fish, schizophrenia and much more in this week’s LabBook, our weekly roundup of University of Chicago Medicine and Biological Sciences research news from our blogs, around campus and the internet.
+
2:14 PM | Splice Variants Reveal New Connections Among Autism Genes
Researchers from the UC San Diego School of Medicine and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute believe they have uncovered a new aspect of autism - that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known. These interactions had not been detected earlier because they involve alternatively spliced forms of autism genes found in the brain.  In their study, the scientists isolated hundreds of new variants of autism genes from the human brain, and then screened their […]
+
9:59 AM | Don’t forget the cerebellum
Many theories of humanness rely on a simple idea that the cerebral cortex is enlarged in humans relative to other primates and in primates relative to other mammals. So it must be the cerebral cortex that is the important part of the brain, giving us our smarts and our skills. What is often overlooked is […]

Baizer, J. (2014). Unique Features of the Human Brainstem and Cerebellum, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8 DOI:

Citation
+
7:48 AM | Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon
Is neuro-skepticism in danger of going too far? Is it time to take a critical look at critiques of neuroscience? Martha Farah of the University of Pennsylvania says yes, in a Hastings Center Report just published: Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater: Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging Farah covers a broad spectrum of criticisms, ranging from […]The post Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Farah MJ (2014). Brain images, babies, and bathwater: critiquing critiques of functional neuroimaging., The Hastings Center report, 44 Suppl 2 30. PMID:

Citation
Editor's Pick

April 10, 2014

+
5:22 PM | Main-lining the Secret Truth of the Universe: Pessimism and the Brain (part 1)
Cohle: I’d consider myself a realist, alright? But in philosophical terms I’m what’s called a pessimist. Hart: Um, okay, what’s that mean? Cohle: Means I’m bad at parties. Hart: Let me tell you, you ain’t great outside of parties either. A friend in college told me that she only felt like she knew the truth when […]
+
3:56 PM | Brain damage can make people immune to the gambler’s fallacy
For them (unlike the rest of us) a near win is just a loss.
+
2:00 PM | The science of spiciness When you take a bite of a hot pepper,...
The science of spiciness When you take a bite of a hot pepper, your body reacts as if your mouth is on fire — because that’s essentially what you’ve told your brain! Rose Eveleth details the science and history behind spicy foods, giving insights into why some people continue to pay the painful price for a little spice. View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-science-of-spiciness-rose-eveleth Lesson by Rose Eveleth, animation by Flaming Medusa Studios Inc. via TED […]
+
6:43 AM | Why do dogs lick people?
Just Wow. Photo: Chris Sembrot PhotographyHi Julie,Yes, but WHY? I loved Claudia Fugazza's guest post about drawing on dogs' social imitation capacities to learn as copy-cats in the Do as I do training technique. Good stuff! A few things collided this week that resulted in me deciding to look into why dogs lick people. The first was the Huffington Post 'This Is What Happens When You Ask People To Kiss Their Dogs In Front Of A Camera' (example above from Chris Sembrot's 'For the love […]

Bradshaw J.W.S., Blackwell E.J. & Casey R.A. (2009). Dominance in domestic dogs—useful construct or bad habit?, Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 4 (3) 135-144. DOI:

Bonanni R., Cafazzo S., Valsecchi P. & Natoli E. (2010). Effect of affiliative and agonistic relationships on leadership behaviour in free-ranging dogs, Animal Behaviour, 79 (5) 981-991. DOI:

Citation
+
12:36 AM | Why do I procrastinate? I'll figure it out later
If you are a chronic procrastinator, you're not alone. Habitual procrastination plagues around 15-20% of adults and 50% of college students. In a chronic procrastinator, repeated failure to efficiently complete important tasks can lead to lower feelings of self-worth. In certain contexts, it can also result in very tangible penalties. For example, a survey in 2002 found that 29% of American tax-payers procrastinated on their taxes, resulting in errors due to rushed filing that cost an average […]

Gustavson, D., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. & Friedman, N. (2014). Genetic Relations Among Procrastination, Impulsivity, and Goal-Management Ability: Implications for the Evolutionary Origin of Procrastination, Psychological Science, DOI:

Citation

April 09, 2014

+
3:26 PM | The Nature Versus Nurture Debate: Are You Born With Language Structure?
Humans are unique in their ability to acquire language. But how? A new study published in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences shows that we are in fact born with the basic fundamental knowledge of language, thus shedding light on the age-old linguistic "nature vs. nurture" debate. While languages differ from each other in many ways, certain aspects appear to be shared across languages. These aspects might stem from linguistic principles that are active in all human brains. A […]
123456
165 Results