Posts

May 03, 2015

+
11:44 PM | Duplicating Humans With Robots Is Very Hard Alex Leonessa, NSF...
Duplicating Humans With Robots Is Very Hard Alex Leonessa, NSF program director for General & Age-Related Disabilities Engineering, describes key challenges in creating truly useful robotic systems to supplementing humans. DARwin-OP, the soccer-playing robot, illustrates some of the issues. By: Live Science Videos.
+
10:29 PM | Guns, Suicide, and Legislating the Doctor-Patient...
Guns, Suicide, and Legislating the Doctor-Patient Relationship Guns are one of those topics that really divide Americans. It’s hard to have a calm, evidence-based discussion. But one area where we really need to be able to do that is in the pediatrician’s office. Why? That’s the topic of this week’s Healthcare Triage. For those of you who want to read more, go here: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/?p=62278 By: Healthcare Triage. Get merch: […]
+
9:13 PM | Parasympathetic Nervous System: Crash Course A&P #15 by...
Parasympathetic Nervous System: Crash Course A&P #15 by thecrashcourse: This week we are looking at your parasympathetic division, which is the “resting and digesting” unit. Unfortunately, learning about this de-stressing division also involves a whole lot of memorization. Don’t worry, though - we’ve got some mnemonic devices to help you out! Support at: http://patreon.com/crashcourse
+
7:54 PM | Procrastinate much? Science offers a way to stop
Procrastination is the thief of time that derails New Year’s resolutions and delays saving for college or retirement, but researchers have found a way to collar it. The trick? Think of the future as now. “The simplified message that we learned in these studies is if the future doesn’t feel imminent, then, even if it’s […]

Lewis, N. & Oyserman, D. (2015). When Does the Future Begin? Time Metrics Matter, Connecting Present and Future Selves, Psychological Science, DOI: 10.1177/0956797615572231

Citation

May 02, 2015

+
10:43 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 01/05/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
10:43 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 01/05/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
6:01 PM | Spontaneous Events Drive Brain Functional Connectivity?
A new study claims that Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events The researchers, Thomas Allan and colleagues from the University of Nottingham (one of the birthplaces of MRI), say that their results challenge the assumption that correlations in neural activity between 'networks' of brain regions reflect slow, steady low frequency oscillations within those networks. Instead, they report that the network connectivity is the result of occasional 'spikes' of coordinate

Allan TW, Francis ST, Caballero-Gaudes C, Morris PG, Liddle EB, Liddle PF, Brookes MJ & Gowland PA (2015). Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events., PloS one, 10 (4) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922945

Citation
+
4:30 PM | Functional Differences In Brain Communication Of Cocaine Users
The brain function of people addicted to cocaine is different from that of people who are not addicted, and often linked to highly impulsive behavior. The variation in the way that different regions of the brain connect, communicate and function in people addicted to cocaine is an observation published in NeuroImage: Clinical.  Cocaine addiction exists among an estimated 800,000 people in the U.S. alone, but despite decades of attempts, FDA-approved medications for cocaine use disorder […]
+
4:00 PM | Why Space Travel May Be Bad For Your Brain
There is bad news for those planning to go to Mars in the near future: a study in mice has suggested that radiation in space could cause cognitive decline in astronauts. However, we know from past research that mental, social and physical exercise can boost cognitive functions. With planned Mars missions moving ever closer, it might be be worth exploring activity as a way to counter radiation damage. read more
+
1:00 PM | Space Travel Worry: Cosmic Ray Exposure Leads To Dementia-Like Impairments
There is discussion of a U.S. manned mission to Mars but if recent history is any indication, the next president will undo the space program of the current one, just as the current one undid the manned space program of the last. It may be for the best, at least as far astronaut safety is concerned. The destructive particles in galactic cosmic ray exposure can forever impair cognition, according to an oncology paper in Science Advances.read more
+
12:22 AM | How Poverty Changes Your Brain Worrying about money can put a...
How Poverty Changes Your Brain Worrying about money can put a strain on you in the short-term, but new research shows that living in poverty can affect you for life. Read More:Poverty OverviewAbout PovertyPoverty Impedes Cognitive FunctionBad Decisions Don’t Make You Poor. Being Poor Makes for Bad Decisions By: DNews.

May 01, 2015

+
3:32 PM | Sleep In Numbers Having trouble sleeping? Always dreaming about...
Sleep In Numbers Having trouble sleeping? Always dreaming about sex in black and white? You’re not alone. Learn more about sleep with Alltime Numbers! By: Alltime Numbers.
+
2:54 PM | Why Do We Twitch When We’re Falling Asleep? A majority of...
Why Do We Twitch When We’re Falling Asleep? A majority of people feel like they’re falling when first going to sleep, resulting in twitches. What is this jerking night spasm? By: Brain Stuff.
+
1:42 PM | New on BrainFacts: The Bullied Brain
Brain research is revealing that bullying is more than just an unfortunate part of growing up. It can cause long-term changes to the brain that lead to cognitive and emotional deficits as serious as the harm done by child abuse. Read my whole story at BrainFacts: Bullying and the Brain .
+
1:42 PM | New on BrainFacts: The Bullied Brain
Brain research is revealing that bullying is more than just an unfortunate part of growing up. It can cause long-term changes to the brain that lead to cognitive and emotional deficits as serious as the harm done by child abuse. Read my whole story at BrainFacts: Bullying and the Brain .
+
1:30 PM | Gout, Urine, And Guinea Pigs: The Weird History Of Lithium
Gather round and I shall tell you a tale! A tale of a mistaken assumption that started a weird, long science odyssey that included urine, steak, and guinea pigs, and ended in a miracle drug.Read more...
+
12:00 PM | Brain Teasers: Cracking the mind’s toughest riddles [video]
How can we instill robotic arms with a sense of touch? What causes us to choke under pressure? How can a misfolded protein cause so much harm to our brains? And is empathy something shared across species, not just humans? Speaking to a packed crowd at the Logan Center on April 1st, neuroscientists from the University of Chicago discussed these questions and more in a series of TED-style talks.
+
8:00 AM | Action waves in the brain
A new theoretical model describes the nervous impulse as an electromechanical waveTwo researchers from Princeton University have developed a theoretical model describing the nervous impulse as an electromechanical wave that travels along nerve fibres, explaining curious experimental observations and challenging basic assumptions about how the brain works. The mechanism of the nervous impulse was made clear in a series of experiments carried out by Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley from the late […]

April 30, 2015

+
11:06 PM | Gender and Language Processing - Linguistics Topic 32 by...
Gender and Language Processing - Linguistics Topic 32 by thelingspace: How do we deal with gender when we process language? Do we take it into consideration when we hear words and sentences? In this week’s episode, we talk about gender and language processing: the different kinds of gender in language, how gender influences our ability to retrieve words from our mental dictionaries, and how our views on gender temporarily keep us from considering otherwise legitimate interpretations of […]
+
8:26 PM | Pesticides alter bees’ brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately
A new report suggests that a particular class of pesticides called “neonicotinoids” wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on […]

Moffat, C., Pacheco, J., Sharp, S., Samson, A., Bollan, K., Huang, J., Buckland, S. & Connolly, C. (2015). Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), The FASEB Journal, DOI: 10.1096/fj.14-267179

Citation
+
8:26 PM | Pesticides alter bees’ brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately
A new report suggests that a particular class of pesticides called “neonicotinoids” wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on […]

Moffat, C., Pacheco, J., Sharp, S., Samson, A., Bollan, K., Huang, J., Buckland, S. & Connolly, C. (2015). Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), The FASEB Journal, DOI: 10.1096/fj.14-267179

Citation
+
8:26 PM | Pesticides alter bees’ brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately
A new report suggests that a particular class of pesticides called “neonicotinoids” wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on […]

Moffat, C., Pacheco, J., Sharp, S., Samson, A., Bollan, K., Huang, J., Buckland, S. & Connolly, C. (2015). Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), The FASEB Journal, DOI: 10.1096/fj.14-267179

Citation
+
8:26 PM | Pesticides alter bees’ brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately
A new report suggests that a particular class of pesticides called “neonicotinoids” wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on […]

Moffat, C., Pacheco, J., Sharp, S., Samson, A., Bollan, K., Huang, J., Buckland, S. & Connolly, C. (2015). Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), The FASEB Journal, DOI: 10.1096/fj.14-267179

Citation
+
4:21 PM | Birds, Brains, and Boats: The Harvey Karten Story
“So, what can I do for you?” To be honest, it wasn’t how I expected to find Dr. Harvey J. Karten, neuroscience Professor Emeritus and recent inductee to the National Academy of the Sciences. But when I open the door his office on a bright San Diego afternoon, he is sitting in front of three monitors, hard at […]
Editor's Pick
+
2:17 AM | Introverts' and extroverts' brains really are different, according to science
Introverts' and extroverts' brains really are different, according to science: Your introversion? Blame it on your brain. Really interesting article!Some highlights:Introverts’ brains tend to prefer the neurochemical acetylcholine over dopamine; both can “feel good”, but acetylcholine is more mellow whereas dopamine can make introverts anxious. (For extraverts, acetylcholine is too subtle.)Introverts tend to prefer the parasympathetic nervous state (calming), while extraverts […]

April 29, 2015

+
9:42 PM | "Individually, an ant is dumb. But the colony? That’s where the intelligence is."
“Individually, an ant is dumb. But the colony? That’s where the intelligence is.” - Ants Swarm Like Brains Think (via azspot) This is a really interesting article. While it doesn’t present any solid findings, it’s an intro to a super interesting cross-disciplinary approach to research. Also, some good discussion of biological feedback systems.
+
9:40 PM | Watch A TED-Talk Audience Member Move Someone Else's Arm With Her Mind
Neuroscientist Greg Gage created quite a stir during a recent TED-Talk when he used a simple, inexpensive DIY kit to enable an audience member to move the arm of another participant. Read more...
+
7:59 PM | Positive Vs. Negative Association Brain Circuitry Discovered In Mice
Neuroscientists have discovered brain circuitry for encoding positive and negative learned associations in mice. After finding that two circuits showed opposite activity following fear and reward learning, the researchers proved that this divergent activity causes either avoidance or reward-driven behaviors. read more
+
7:19 PM | Are Babies ‘Wired’ To Check Out The Unexpected? When...
Are Babies ‘Wired’ To Check Out The Unexpected? When 11-month-old babies were shown surprising situations. – such as a ball appearing to go through a wall – they quickly tried to test it themselves. By: Live Science Videos.
+
3:15 PM | Neuroscientist Uses One Person’s Brain to Control Another Person’s Arm (Video)
Greg Gage has always been fascinated by the brain. He dedicated his whole life to studying it, and spent six and a half years in graduate school at the University of Michigan just to earn the title of neuroscientist. As he climbed his way up the academic ladder, Gage noticed a major problem with the field of neuroscience: the equipment needed to do any serious research was so expensive that it was only available in the largest universities and institutions. In other […]
123456789
267 Results