Posts

October 30, 2014

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7:52 PM | EPA Refines Pollution Rules
Last week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was told by a federal appeals court that it could move forward with implementing a program to curb air pollution that crosses state lines. The Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CASPR) would require 28 states to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide by power plants.…
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7:23 PM | Pet trade likely responsible for killer salamander fungus
As if amphibians weren't facing enough—a killer fungal disease, habitat destruction, pollution, and global warming—now scientists say that a second fungal disease could spell disaster for dozens, perhaps hundreds, of species. A new paper finds that this disease has the potential to wipe out salamanders and newts across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Americas.
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6:27 PM | Into the Bat Caves of Kenya: Pt. I In January 2014, Emily...
Into the Bat Caves of Kenya: Pt. I In January 2014, Emily accompanied Curator of Mammals Bruce Patterson on a field expedition into the bat caves of Kenya. They were joined with Field Museum Media Producers Greg Mercer and Emily Ward to document the experience. This is the 1st installment in a 2-part series of highlights from the trip; there’s much more to come! By: The Brain Scoop.
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6:13 PM | Big Ag Indeed: Organic Food Expected To Reach $105 Billion Next Year
Organic marketing may like to portray itself as small mom-and-pop farmers standing up to Big Agriculture and corporate food, but they have a business juggernaut that would be the envy of anyone in any business. And it's going to get better.read more
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4:00 PM | Agreement with NY State Protects Black Rock Forest
New York State will acquire a conservation easement for the Black Rock Forest, protecting the 3,800-acre preserve 50 miles north of New York City for both public use and scientific research.
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3:38 PM | Poorer Nations Are Growing Renewables Nearly Twice as Fast as Richer Ones
According to a new study from Climatescope, developing nations are far outpacing developed ones when it comes to the installation of new renewable energy infrastructure. The study monitored 55 developing countries, including emerging economies like China, Brazil, South Africa, India and Kenya, and found that between the years of 2008-2013, developing nations saw 143% growth in renewable energy, versus only 84% in developed countries. The Climatescope project was originally […]
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3:20 PM | 12 cities and 12 hundred participants gather in Rotterdam to talk deltas and climate change
Last month, concurrent with the UN Climate Summit, twelve C40 cities and more than 1200 people gathered in Rotterdam to attend the Second Deltas in Times of Climate Change Conference, supported by C40. Representatives from Tokyo, Hong Kong, Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Singapore, Melbourne, New Orleans, Copenhagen, London, Venice, and Washington DC joined their…
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3:16 PM | The Search for Lost Frogs: one of conservation's most exciting expeditions comes to life in new book
One of the most exciting conservation initiatives in recent years was the Search for Lost Frogs in 2010. The brainchild of scientist, photographer, and frog-lover, Robin Moore, the initiative brought a sense of hope—and excitement—to a whole group of animals often ignored by the global public—and media outlets. Now, Moore has written a fascinating account of the expedition: In Search of Lost Frogs.
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2:25 PM | Trick-or-Treating With Predators: Who is the Candy Bar of the Prairie?
Predators trick-or-treating across the northern plains are on the look out for their favorite full-sized candy bar. In a new video released this week, hear from our American Prairie Reserve biologists, Kyran and Damien, as they talk about the crucial role that these miniature snacks play in the larger ecosystem. Watch as hungry badgers go door to door —…
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2:25 PM | The Fish That Inspired a Woman to Help Save a Species
Shana Miller was fresh out of college in 1998 when she came face-to-face with one of the fastest fish in the sea. She and her friends battled for three hours to haul a 154-pound bluefin tuna aboard their boat off the Maryland coast. And when she finally looked the creature in the eye, she felt…
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1:57 PM | Resourceful Crustaceans Turn Invasive Seaweed into Homes
When a new developer comes to town and starts aggressively building up the empty property around your home, you can get mad—or you can move in. That’s what tiny crustaceans in the Georgia mudflats have done. Facing an invasive Japanese seaweed, they’ve discovered that it makes excellent shelter, protecting them from all kinds of threats. […]The post Resourceful Crustaceans Turn Invasive Seaweed into Homes appeared first on Inkfish.

Wright, J., Byers, J., DeVore, J. & Sotka, E. (2014). Engineering or food? mechanisms of facilitation by a habitat-forming invasive seaweed, Ecology, 95 (10) 2699-2706. DOI: 10.1890/14-0127.1

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1:50 PM | Reservoirs and hydropower are often thought of as climate friendly, but new research suggests that w
Reservoirs and hydropower are often thought of as climate friendly, but new research suggests that we may have underestimated the amount of methane they produce. The methane—which is 35 times as potent a greenhouse gas as CO2 over the span of a century—is produced by bacteria eating nutrient-rich agricultural runoff.Read more...
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1:11 PM | Breaking Ground Is Hard To Do
No summary available for this post.
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7:01 AM | Why California’s Largest Estuary No Longer Works for Wildlife
Startling maps in a new report on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta show the dramatic loss of marshlands that once supported a vast array of wildlife.

October 29, 2014

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11:00 PM | Shale gas, coal seam gas… what’s the difference?
By Tsuey Cham A few weeks ago we took a look at coal seam gas (CSG) and the hydraulic fracturing (‘fraccing’) process used in its extraction. You may have also heard of shale gas, another type of natural gas found deep underground. So what exactly makes them different? In terms of their gas content they’re […]
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8:54 PM | Is our climate headed for a mathematical tipping...
Is our climate headed for a mathematical tipping point? Scientists have warned that as CO2 levels in the atmosphere rise an increase in Earth’s temperature by even two degrees could lead to catastrophic effects across the world. But how can such a tiny, measurable change in one factor lead to huge, unpredictable changes elsewhere? Victor J. Donnay uses billiards to illustrate tipping points, chaotic motion and their implications on climate change. View full lesson: […]
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7:40 PM | This High-Tech Floating Laboratory Will Be a Spaceship for the Sea
It’s being called a starship Enterprise for the water, and not merely for its futuristic shape. SeaOrbiter, designed by French architect Jacques Rougerie, is envisioned as a high-tech moving laboratory, carrying scientists on long treks through an environment not inherently friendly to human life. At the moment, the craft is still on the drawing board. […]The post This High-Tech Floating Laboratory Will Be a Spaceship for the Sea appeared first on The Crux.
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6:06 PM | Turtle Ninjas
They often work alone, usually at night, wearing dark clothing. They work long hours for little or no pay, and even less notoriety. They do it for the turtles.
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2:00 PM | California Voters to Decide $7.5 Billion Water Bond Measure
Learn about Proposition One, which would issue billions in bonds for water projects.

October 28, 2014

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10:06 PM | Rapa Expedition: Diving the Marotiri Maelstrom
Kike Ballesteros and Alan Friedlander dive the dangerous and unpredictable Marotiri Shoals, battling the elements to collect scientific data. Curious onlookers, in the form of large predators, come to join them.
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8:59 PM | Rapa Expedition: Human Impacts on Wild Sharks
With many sharks sighted in Marotiri with fishing hooks protruding from their bodies, it seems that almost nothing is untouched by man. However, human impact can also be positive—will the Expedition be able to help these sharks?
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8:56 PM | Rapa Expedition: What Do Sharks Do When We’re Not Looking?
To film animal behavior out of the view of human eyes, the team deploys cameras to drift in the open ocean and record whatever comes their way.
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6:01 PM | Deforestation And Industrial-Scale Farming Could Lie Behind Ebola Outbreak
Ebola: EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, CC BY-SABy Richard Kock, Royal Veterinary CollegeThe still growing Ebola virus outbreak not only highlights the tragedy enveloping the areas most affected but also offers a commentary on they way in which the political ecology in West Africa allowed this disease to become established. read more
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2:33 PM | I want one of these!
Via Geoff Manaugh at BLDBLOG and the US Military, a spectacular digital/analog sandbox! Yes, it's developed for war games and military planning and operations, but wow, does it look like fun. The digital dimensions are powered by Microsoft's X-box Kinect...
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2:31 PM | Where Did All The Oil From The Deepwater Horizon Spill Go?
Damage assessments from environmental hazards are always a challenge because of the competing constituencies pulling on science and the fuzzy nature of estimates. After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama administration was editing science reports to reflect its goals, environmentalists were raising money claiming earth was ruined and using wild guesses for damage, and BP lobbyists were mitigating penalties behind the scenes by claiming it wasn't so bad. What about […]
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2:00 PM | On GMO Labeling, Oregon and Colorado Learn from California Ballot Defeat
As Oregon and Colorado vote on GMO labeling, advocates say they learned from the defeat of a similar measure in California in 2012. Watch the video to learn more.
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11:42 AM | Lockheed Aims for Commercial, Compact Fusion Reactor Within Ten Years
Originally posted on robertscribbler:Ever since major industrialized nations learned how to fuse atoms in megabombs able to blast scores of square miles to smithereens, the quest has been on to harness the vast potential energy store that is nuclear…
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11:17 AM | 3D printing for environmental research
For Manchester Science Festival I have been demonstrating an exploration of using 3D printing (additive manufacturing) to support environmental and ecology research and teaching. Apart from the practical benefits I think 3D printing is an important development for open research because it allows us to share hardware more easily than ever before, simply by sharing …

October 27, 2014

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11:06 PM | October 26, 2014: Give a Turtle CPR, Climb Yosemite’s Most Iconic Peaks, and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb all of the world's tallest mountains, write travel stories, pack for a purpose, give a turtle CPR, set records in the Yosemite Valley, find early humans where you don't expect to, map the Earth, the oceans and Mars, and harvest GMOs.
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10:30 PM | Culling The Population Is Not A Realistic Environmental Solution
In the 1960s and '70s, population bomb reality was said to be as settled as climate change is today. No less than Dr. John Holden, current Obama administration Science Czar, co-authored a book called Ecoscience, which argued that forced sterilization and mass abortions might  be necessary, and even viable under the equal protection clause of the Constitution.read more
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