Posts

November 19, 2014

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3:53 PM | Malaysia’s Prime Minister Says Fast-Growing Nations Have Role in Curbing Warming
The prime minister of gas-rich Malaysia sees a climate-friendly path ahead.
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2:00 PM | Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm than Good
Migratory monarch butterfly populations have fallen into a tailspin in recent years. Scientists fear that in a classic case of good intentions gone awry, efforts to help the beleaguered butterflies may be inadvertently making matters worse by changing their behavior.
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6:07 AM | Both Beautiful and Disturbing, a New NASA Visualization Shows Carbon Dioxide Emissions Swirling Around the World
The following is a guest post from Paul McDivitt, a second-year master’s student studying journalism and mass communication research at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He is taking a course in journalistic blogging from me there. This is his second post at Discover. His first was at Keith Kloor’s Collide-a-Scape blog. Follow Paul on twitter @paulmcdivitt. In the wake […]The post Both Beautiful and Disturbing, a New NASA Visualization Shows Carbon Dioxide […]
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4:01 AM | Along the Murray-Darling in a ‘bot
It’s a big place, the Murray-Darling Basin. Over a million km2 – about one-seventh of the whole of Australia. There’s a lot to know about it, and we’re helping students find out more for themselves, using a novel CSIRO innovation. The National Museum of Australia and the Murray-Darling Basin Authority have teamed up to let […]
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12:57 AM | 5 Ways to Protect the Reefs While Having Fun on a Dive
5 Ways to Protect the Reefs While Having Fun on a Dive: Scuba divers can have a negative impact on...
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12:57 AM | 5 Ways to Protect the Reefs While Having Fun on a Dive
5 Ways to Protect the Reefs While Having Fun on a Dive: Scuba divers can have a negative impact on...

November 18, 2014

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10:39 PM | A tale of 2 Perus: Climate Summit host, 57 murdered environmentalists
On September 1st, indigenous activist, Edwin Chota, and three other indigenous leaders were gunned down and their bodies thrown into rivers. Chota, an internationally-known leader of the Asháninka in Peru, had warned several times that his life was on the line for his vocal stance against the destruction of his peoples' forests, yet the Peruvian government did nothing to protect him—or others.
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4:46 PM | Using games to teach kids the value of nature and philanthropy
Kids are spending more time using tablets and smart phones for learning and entertainment. But hours spent gaming, Tweeting, and playing on Instagram and Facebook, may mean less engagement with nature, potentially making it more difficult for conservation organizations to inspire and influence the next generation of donors and decision makers. Given the state of the world's environment, that is a troubling thought.
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4:16 PM | The Nature Conservancy & C40 Release Urban Water Blueprint
Today, The Nature Conservancy released a report analyzing the state of water resources for 530 cities worldwide. The report – Urban Water Blueprint: Mapping Conservation Solutions to the Global Water Challenge – and interactive websitewere done in partnership with C40 and the International Water Association, and offer recommendations for how to revitalize strained water resources…
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3:52 PM | Scientists identify mystery virus that turned millions of starfish into ‘goo’
In the spring of 2008 I first started noticing that large ochre sea stars (or starfish) known as Pisaster were literally turning to ooze on the western coast of Vancouver Island – both on beaches and in experimental aquariums. Descrier - news and culture magazine
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3:24 PM | Bacteria decides if you’ll be fat or thin
Some people can’t lose weight and some people can’t put it on and I’m one of those people that people hate because I can eat whatever I want without gaining a pound whilst my friends find it extremely difficult to lose weight and all that is because we have different metabolisms to each other. It’s also a well known fact that we get our looks from our parents so it won’t be a surprise if I tell you that we also inherit our weight from our parents too.  The […]
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2:30 PM | What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps
Plenty of animals build their homes in oak trees. But some very teeny, tricky wasps make the tree do all the work. “What nerve!” you might say. What… gall! And you’d be right. The wasps are called gall-inducers. And each miniature mansion that the trees build for the wasps' larvae is weirder and more flamboyant than the next.
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2:00 PM | Using Nano/Micromachines to Help Clean Up Oil Spills
One of the largest oil spills in recent history happened in April 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico when the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank, resulting in the blowout of the Macondo well located approximately 66 km off the Louisiana coast. Oil spills, or the accidental release of liquid petroleum into the environment, […]
Editor's Pick
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6:51 AM | Sulfur: As You Like It
Speaking of sulfur: This common element turns out to be highly useful for understanding planetary processes – both on Earth and Mars. Two new papers by Dr. Itay Halevy use sulfur chemistry to understand the history of sulfur-loving microbes at the bottom of the ocean and the compounds spewed from Martian volcanoes that may have…
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2:48 AM | Scientists Suspect a Virus is Causing Sea Star Die-Off
But the virus isn't new to sea stars, so what triggered the current outbreak remains a mystery.
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1:11 AM | NEW VIDEO! Welcome to the Sixth Extinction There are two sides...
NEW VIDEO! Welcome to the Sixth Extinction There are two sides to the coin of life. Things come into being, and things die off. Lately, though, that coin has been coming up a lot more on the latter side. Earth’s species are dying off at an alarming pace, with species going extinct at thousands of times their natural rate. There have been five major extinction events in the history of life on Earth, but scientists are beginning to realize that we’re at the start of a new […]

November 17, 2014

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11:25 PM | November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York's rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.
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9:10 PM | October in a Tie As Warmest on Record. But What About that Global Warming Hiatus?
It seems that 2014 is still very much on track to be the warmest year on record. On Friday, NASA released data showing that this past October tied with 2005 as the warmest in a record stretching back to 1880. This follows record breaking warmth in September and August. Even so, Earth’s average temperature isn’t […]The post October in a Tie As Warmest on Record. But What About that Global Warming Hiatus? appeared first on ImaGeo.
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8:00 PM | Alternative Medicine For Plants: Probiotics And Detox Instead Of GMOs
Scientists have found that transplanting a microbe that occurs naturally in eastern cottonwood trees boosts the ability of willow and lawn grass to withstand the effects of the industrial pollutant phenanthrene. Because the plants can then take up 25 to 40 percent more of the pollutant than untreated plants they could be useful in phytoremediation, the process of using plants to remove toxins from contaminated sites, without all the environmentalist political lobbying drama of using […]
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5:58 PM | TODAY: Chat With National Geographic Explorer Enric Sala
Do you ever wonder what it’s like to be a National Geographic Explorer? Here’s your chance to connect directly with someone who has ventured to unexplored areas, discovered previously unknown life forms, taken stunning photographs, and put it all to work to help protect some of the last wild places on Earth. From the Russian Arctic to…
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5:02 PM | A nature photographer's dream: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society
Julie Larsen Maher has what many wildlife photographers would consider a dream job: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a non-profit that runs five zoos and aquariums in New York City as well as numerous site-based field programs in the U.S. and overseas. As staff photographer, Maher helps tell the stories behind WCS's conservation work, which ranges from veterinary procedures with Bronx Zoo animals to working with local communities in remote parts of Zambia to […]
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4:39 PM | Science, technology and democracy: Sense About Science lecture - podcast
Professor Steve Rayner delivers the 2014 Sense About Science lecture, 'Science, Technology and Democracy: Dissecting the Anatomies of Controversy' Continue reading...
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4:30 PM | Peru Prepares to Host Climate Talks as its Indigenous Forest Defenders Die
The resource rush on Peru's Amazon frontier is exacting a rising toll on indigenous communities, a rights group warns.
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3:00 PM | Secrets of the Spider Web
Watch a biologist extract silk from a live spider, as he works to uncover the secrets of this surprisingly versatile material.
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1:55 PM | ‘Threatened’ listing for Gunnison sage grouse rouses political scuffle
  A pair of Gunnison sage grouse. Credit/US Fish a […]
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11:38 AM | A new strategy for tackling climate change - podcast
Have we been going about tackling climate change in completely the wrong way? This year's Sense About Science lecture proposed an alternative strategy Continue reading...
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4:00 AM | Warmest Ocean Temperatures Ever Recorded
A study of the variability of the global climate system has revealed that a significant warming of our planet’s oceans has taken place in recent months. Global Ocean Temperatures (Axel Timmerman)"This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded since their systematic measuring started. Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Niño year," says Axel Timmermann, climate scientist and professor at the International Pacific […]
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3:30 AM | Latest findings about the faces of the Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef is many different things to different people: a tropical playground, a natural wonder, and the domain of Nemo, Dory and Bruce. But it’s  also home to around a million Australians, a booming tourism industry, major exporting ports and countless fishing, farming and agriculture operations. Indisputably the Reef has immense ecological importance […]
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12:58 AM | Are Marine Protected Areas in the Right Places to Protect People, or Just Nature?
Mark Spalding, senior marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy I’m at the World Parks Congress, a-once-a-decade global meeting of scientists, protected area managers and other experts to focus on the state and future of national parks and nature reserves. There’s so much to talk about here—new science and technologies to monitor parks, ways to engage local…

November 16, 2014

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11:45 AM | How Do You Relate to Your Environment?
I’ve been reading Brian Little’s interesting book, Me, Myself, and Us: the Science of Personality and the Art of Well-Being. Among other things, he discusses various  frameworks for understanding people’s different traits. I’d never heard about the “Environmental Response Inventory” before, and found it very compelling. Created by George McKechnie, this set of traits is meant […]
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