Posts

October 22, 2014

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8:39 PM | Top Notch Photorealistic Invertebrate Illustrations by Carim Nahaboo
London-based illustrator Carim Nahaboo knocked my socks off this afternoon with his fantastic invertebrate illustrations. At first glance, it would be easy to mistake many of his illustrations for photographs.  The level of […]
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6:42 PM | Whistleblower Who Exposed White House Tampering with Climate Science Dies
Rick Piltz passed away last Saturday. He spent decades working in the federal government and state government in Texas, and was a prominent whistleblower during the Bush administration. He later... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:29 PM | Statewide Pesticide Use–California Draft Environmental Impact Report
Throughout the report, the Department fails to consider recommending changing crops and practices to avoid pest impacts. Of course, we might have passed the point where we can feed our growing population without pesticides. In this case, we can look forward to a time of forced population decline. Continue reading →
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2:35 PM | Saving the survivor: China scrambles to keep the finless porpoise from extinction
On the morning of July 14, 2002 Qi Qi ate breakfast as he always did. As the world’s only captive baiji – or Yangtze river dolphin – Qi Qi was something of a celebrity in China and his caretakers kept a close eye on his health. That care may explain why, after being injured by fishermen, he lived an impressive 22 years in the Freshwater Dolphin Research Center in Wuhan, China.
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11:00 AM | Dams Are Not The Smart Way To Secure Water For Agriculture
The Ord River dam, completed in 1971, formed Australia's largest artificial lake in the far north west. Graeme Churchard/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SABy Willem Vervoort, University of SydneySome 27 irrigation and dam projects are highlighted in the green paper for agricultural competitiveness released this week by agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce. read more
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3:53 AM | 5 Ways to Support Coral Conservation Without Getting Wet
5 Ways to Support Coral Conservation Without Getting Wet: Scuba divers can support marine and coral...
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3:53 AM | 5 Ways to Support Coral Conservation Without Getting Wet
5 Ways to Support Coral Conservation Without Getting Wet: Scuba divers can support marine and coral...

October 21, 2014

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10:02 PM | Rapa Expedition: An Ancient Secret for Protecting the Future
People have survived for centuries on the tiny island of Rapa, carefully managing their resources through an ancient system known as rahui. What lessons does it hold for the rest of the world today?
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7:19 PM | Corn Belt Pollution: Louisiana Shrimp And Oysters Pay The Price
By Meg Wilcox Senior Manager, Communications, Ceres The Croatian Pride pushes off the dock and cuts slowly through the grey Gulf of Mexico, its engine growling. The air hangs thick and steamy, and the movement of the 40-foot oyster boat brings relief as it breezes past marshy areas where blue herons stand sentinel. The boat’s…
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6:40 PM | Satellite Images Reveal How the U.S. Oil Boom Is Creating New Cities
This image from NASA reveals a massive cluster of lights in what was — until recently — desolate prairie. This is the Bakken Shale, an oil-rich rock formation stretching across parts of North Dakota, Montana and Canada. The lights are from the illuminated derricks, local boomtowns and gas flares of the oil fields.Read more...
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5:24 PM | What can we do about climate change?
I could rephrase this question. What should we do about climate change. The reason I might rephrase this is because we may not ben that sure of what we can do, but we should do something. Or, more accurately, some things. There are a lot of possible things we can do, and we have little…
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5:05 PM | Top scientists raise concerns over commercial logging on Woodlark Island
A number of the world's top conservation scientists have raised concerns about plans for commercial logging on Woodlark Island, a hugely biodiverse rainforest island off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The scientists, with the Alliance of Leading Environmental Scientists and Thinkers (ALERT), warn that commercial logging on the island could imperil the island's stunning local species and its indigenous people.
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2:59 PM | Industrial-Scale Tiger Farms: Feeding China’s Thirst for Luxury Tiger Products
Young, healthy tigers jump through rings of fire, sit upright on cue, clawing at the air, and perform other well-choreographed circus tricks. Enthusiastic crowds cheer. After the show, some pay extra to hold small, cuddly cubs. But those who visit these tiger attractions in China have no idea of the suffering behind the scenes or the dark commerce that keeps them afloat.
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1:39 PM | The Heat is On: 2014 Headed for Warmest Year on Record
Last week, a NASA update pegged September as the warmest on record. Now, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has concurred — and reported that 2014 is on track to be the be the warmest year since record keeping began in 1880. NOAA also reports  that the January through September period was tied with 1998 […]The post The Heat is On: 2014 Headed for Warmest Year on Record appeared first on ImaGeo.

October 20, 2014

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11:57 PM | Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay
Join Ken Sims as he tackles perilous ice-encrusted volcanoes in the attempt to study their geological past in Antarctica.
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11:18 PM | October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they unearth the habits of the world's largest-ever carnivore, digest kitchen waste to cook dinner, eat like a 500 year old king, stalk Chernobyl's ruins, trace tree rings' roots, write a novel about elephants with a plot twist, kayak to protest dams, prosecute poachers in Mozambique, and see the unseen as a large format film.
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9:30 PM | Finding Fracking Fluids In The Environment
New geochemical tracers can identify any hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that could have spilled into the environment, according to field tests at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania. read more
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8:00 PM | Antibiotic Levels In Farm-Raised Fish Are Safe, But Need Watching
Modern food science has meant a lot fewer people starving, but there has also been an increase in products designed to keep animals and fish healthy, like antibiotics. Antibiotics do not just disappear. Even in trace amounts, over time they can build up in the environment and that gives bacteria another path to developing resistance.read more
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6:00 PM | Indonesia developing mega coal mine five times larger than Singapore
Global miner BHP Billiton and Indonesian partner PT Adaro are developing what could become the single largest mine in Indonesia in terms of land area, with BHP owning 75 percent. The IndoMet mine complex in Central and East Kalimantan provinces on Borneo comprises seven coal concessions, which cover 350,000 hectares, or about five times the size of Singapore.
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3:26 PM | Pacific Islanders In Canoes Blockade A Coal Export Terminal in Australia
Last Monday (10/13), at the opening of a new mine in Queensland, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said, “Let’s have no demonization of coal. Coal is good for humanity, coal is good for prosperity, coal is an essential part of our economic future, here in Australia, and right around the world… Coal is essential for the prosperity of the world.” The comments immediately sparked outrage from the environmental community, who were already […]
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2:08 PM | Walking the walk: zoo kicks off campaign for orangutans and sustainable palm oil
If you see people wearing orange this October, it might not be for Halloween, but for orangutans. Chester Zoo’s conservation campaign, Go Orange for Orangutans, kicks off this month for its second year. The campaign aims to raise money, and awareness, for orangutans in Borneo, which have become hugely impacted by deforestation often linked to palm oil plantations.
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1:45 PM | Martin Sheen and His Hypocritical Hate of Plastics
Last Friday I wrote of Lindsay Lohan's love of plastics. Her feelings are not shared by all of Hollywood however. Martin Sheen is a good example. On Saturday, he had a new boat christened after him. The boat is a research vessel for studying ocean plastics. While I've written many times that plastics have no business being in the ocean (or polluting any other part of the natural environment for that matter), the importance of ocean to plastics to mankind's survival is...open to debate. Sheen […]
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1:39 PM | Rapa Expedition: Off the Ship, Into the Jungle
With winds so strong the waterfalls were flowing upwards, the Pristine Seas crew lands at Rapa Iti and must hike the final miles to make it to the Island Council meeting for permission to begin the expedition.
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8:36 AM | Reasons for visiting ER by those with autism
ER - Emergency Room - or as we call it here in Blighty Accident & Emergency (A & E), is never a particularly desirable place to visit given the emphasis on illness or injury of yourself or loved one. That being said, staff there do a sterling job sometimes under very stressful circumstances, responding to all-manner of complaints, some of which are life-threatening.The paper by Dorothea Iannuzzi and colleagues [1] sought to identify some of the medical reasons why ER […]

Iannuzzi DA, Cheng ER, Broder-Fingert S & Bauman ML (2014). Brief Report: Emergency Department Utilization by Individuals with Autism., Journal of autism and developmental disorders, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261249

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October 19, 2014

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9:49 PM | Australia aims to end extinction of native wildlife by 2020
We must also work to reverse human impacts that damage wildlife habitats. Continue reading →
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7:53 PM | How Wolves Change Rivers Check out this brilliant short film...
How Wolves Change Rivers Check out this brilliant short film from Sustainable Human about the effects of reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone National Park, where they had been absent since the last one was killed in 1926 until their reintroduction in 1995.  While recent research suggests that the real story isn’t quite as neat and tidy as the one presented in the film (trophic cascades and food webs are incredibly complex! Who knew?!), it’s a great reminder of how every thread […]

October 18, 2014

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7:39 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 17/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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7:39 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 17/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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7:01 PM | The Places We Love VII: Cleaning Up India
Thinking of visiting India? Then cheer for the Prime Minister's new "Clean India" campaign. If successful, it will take out a nasty stain on India's rich cultural tapestry.

October 17, 2014

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8:44 PM | Indonesia’s tough choice: capping coal as Asian demand grows
Indonesia cannot build power stations fast enough. And neither can most of its Asian neighbors. Rapid economic and population growth are driving equally rapid demands for electricity as the region builds out power grids to connect up millions of people to fuel prosperity.
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