Posts

March 31, 2015

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2:00 PM | How to Extend Your Mobile Battery Life
Have you ever frantically searched for an outlet to charge your phone? You are not alone. Mobile devices have a large number of different adjustable system settings, but the energy impact of those settings can be difficult to understand for average users, and even for experts. Now, a team of computer scientists from the University […] The post How to Extend Your Mobile Battery Life appeared first on EH Science.

March 30, 2015

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1:00 PM | Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?
After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water. And it’s hard to do it in a way that’s friendly to sea life. But a group of mayors around Monterey Bay say they don't have any other options.

March 27, 2015

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4:30 PM | The Truth Behind The Million Dollar Space Pen Hoax
There's a famous legend that America spent millions on the development of a "Space Pen" that writes upside down, while the Russians used a pencil. Here's the truth behind the legend. Read more...
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3:00 PM | Watch Engineers Extinguish Fire With Sound [Video]
In the near future, putting out grease fires in the kitchen might be as easy as turning up the music, thanks to engineering students Viet Tran and Seth Robertson at George Mason University. The students just unveiled a 20-pound backpack prototype that blasts out flames using low-frequency sound waves. The students used their own money to fund their project, and had an uphill battle from the start--including searing skepticism from both classmates and faculty. “My initial impression […]

March 26, 2015

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2:29 PM | Trash to Gas: A Solution to Half Our Problems?
“New innovation from scientists,” read the subject line from my Mom’s email. Attached was a link to a Youtube clip of a male scientist balling plastic bags, sealing them in a steel vessel, and pushing a button. After a couple of hours, the eager scientist cracked open the vessel, and poured out a dark, ominous […]
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12:00 PM | Women and Technology: An ever-evolving relationship
By Aadita Chaudhury Technology and Engineering subject editor Many of us here at Science Borealis are passionate about encouraging the participation of women in science, engineering, mathematics and technology (STEM) fields, especially this month, which is women’s History Month (March) and contains International Women’s Day  (as addressed in our previous editorial post). While the life sciences and – to a lesser extent – the physical sciences, have seen a steady […]

March 25, 2015

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6:40 PM | Study Suggests Magnetic Fields Can Control Heat And Sound
More than a hundred years ago, physicists discovered that heat is simply the energy stored in the vibrations of atoms. This meant that heat and sound are related. Now, for the first time ever, scientists have experimentally shown that these atomic vibrations have magnetic properties, too.Read more...

March 24, 2015

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7:38 PM | Drexel Snapshot: What Can Venetian ‘High Water’ Teach Us About Climate Resiliency?
Drexel environmental engineering professor Franco Montalto, PhD, is on sabbatical in Venice, where he’s getting a close look at the effects of climate on the urban ecosystem. Montalto, who designs, installs and monitors green infrastructure as part of his research, describes his encounter with Venice’s acqua alta phenomenon during his first week there and how … Continue reading →

March 21, 2015

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11:30 AM | WISE...
Image Source: Louisiana Tech UniversityArizona: The Women in Engineering Program at the University of Arizona aims to increase interest and diversity in the fields of social and natural science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine by offering a variety of outreach programs and student engagement opportunities. In doing so, we work to motivate students to enter careers in STEMM fields and to support them along the way. At WISE we firmly believe that greater diversity produces […]

March 20, 2015

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5:03 PM | All About STEM Education at Pop Warner Banquet
    Samantha here! I want to share news about an event I’ll be attending! The Southwest Regional Pop Warner Scholars Banquet will be held on March 21 in San Antonio, TX. It’s true what they say, everything really is bigger in Texas! And this event is no exception. With over 200 Pop Warner cheerleaders and their  parents in the audience, the BIG topic will be education. I’ll share my experiences as an engineer (and former AZ Cardinals […]

March 19, 2015

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6:52 PM | Career Spotlight: Biologist
Matt Wandell is a biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium at California Academy of Sciences. Watch how cool his job is.
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6:00 PM | Autonomous Materials Will Let Future Robots Change Color And Shift Shape
New robots could take on exciting new forms and applications, with each component of the machine able to react and act on its own, according to a review published today in…

March 18, 2015

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10:34 PM | How alien cell membranes could form in methane seas
What might aliens look like? If Star Trek is to be believed, they would mostly look like jobbing actors with plasticene on their faces. But the environment which enabled a warm-blooded, two-legged ape to become the alpha organism is very specific to Earth – a myriad of different creatures could evolve on planets with a…

Stevenson, J., Lunine, J. & Clancy, P. (2015). Membrane alternatives in worlds without oxygen: Creation of an azotosome, Science Advances, 1 (1) DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1400067

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10:34 PM | How alien cell membranes could form in methane seas
What might aliens look like? If Star Trek is to be believed, they would mostly look like jobbing actors with plasticene on their faces. But the environment which enabled a warm-blooded, two-legged ape to become the alpha organism is very specific to Earth – a myriad of different creatures could evolve on planets with a…

Stevenson, J., Lunine, J. & Clancy, P. (2015). Membrane alternatives in worlds without oxygen: Creation of an azotosome, Science Advances, 1 (1) DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1400067

Citation
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3:14 PM | An Improved Method for Coating Gold Nanorods
Researchers have fine-tuned a technique for coating gold nanorods with silica shells, allowing engineers to create large quantities of the nanorods and giving them more control over the thickness of the shell. Gold nanorods are being investigated for use in a wide variety of biomedical applications.
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2:14 AM | Flexible Electronic Devices Experience Organic Growth
A Korean research team led by Professor Soonmin Seo report a new method for preparing highly flexible, stretchable, and patchable  organic electronic devices. The major breakthrough is reported in the Journal of Polymer Science B: Polymer Physics, by Prof. Soonmin  Seo and co-workers at Gachon University and Pukyong National University in Korea. In the report, […] The post Flexible Electronic Devices Experience Organic Growth appeared first on Wiley Asia Blog.

March 17, 2015

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3:37 PM | New Terminator-Inspired Method Makes 3D Printing 25-100 Times Faster (Video)
In the climax of the movie “Terminator 2″, the Terminator’s arch-nemesis — the evil T-1000 — is melted down into a puddle of metallic goo. Unfortunately for Arnold and company, the robot re-emerges seconds later, rising fully-formed from the puddle of molten metal. It was this scene that inspired a group of scientists at a company called Carbon3D to completely rethink our current methods of 3D printing. The company, which had […]
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12:31 PM | Gender equality in science: it takes a village
SUMMARY: Late last year, a metastudy was published showing that, since 2000, things are improving for women working in most STEM-based fields, although there are some notable exceptions The scarcity of women in the ranks of working scientists has been in the news for a discouragingly long time. But research that tries to understand the reasons is filled contradictions, mainly because these studies were conducted at different times and on different science, technology, engineering and […]
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12:31 PM | Gender equality in science: it takes a village
SUMMARY: Late last year, a metastudy was published showing that, since 2000, things are improving for women working in most STEM-based fields, although there are some notable exceptions The scarcity of women in the ranks of working scientists has been in the news for a discouragingly long time. But research that tries to understand the reasons is filled contradictions, mainly because these studies were conducted at different times and on different science, technology, engineering and […]

Ceci S.J., S. Kahn & W. M. Williams (2014). Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape, Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 15 (3) 75-141. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1529100614541236

Smith K., Fiona M. Watt & Susan L. Solomon (2015). Seven Actionable Strategies for Advancing Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Cell Stem Cell, 16 (3) 221-224. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2015.02.012

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March 15, 2015

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11:30 AM | SWE...
Society of Women's Engineers - AboutTopics: Diversity in Science, Engineering, Science, Women in ScienceThe Society of Women's Engineers was established in 1950, and has over 30,000 members. For more than six decades, SWE has given women engineers a unique place and voice within the engineering industry. Our organization is centered around a passion for our members' success and continues to evolve with the challenges and opportunities reflected in today's exciting engineering and technology […]
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11:00 AM | One Plus One Equals Three...
Guest blog post by Paul R. Zielinski, MS, MBA, Director, Technology Partnerships Office, National Institute of Standards and Technology & Chair, Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology TransferTopics: Economy, Industry, Investment, Jobs, NIST, Science, STEMWhen you want a plant to grow, you provide water, light, and fertilizer. When you want an economy to grow you provide capital, labor, and innovation.In today’s global markets, companies that don’t innovate generally […]

March 14, 2015

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6:55 PM | Architects Have Designed A “Shadowless” Skyscraper for the London Skyline
The concrete jungles of the world are growing faster and faster every day. The year 2014 saw 97 skyscrapers built worldwide – the most ever in a single year, beating out the previous record of 81 set back in 2011. For most metropolitan areas, more skyscrapers means less sun. The massive buildings cast proportionately massive shadows, leaving downtown streets in almost constant shade. So when the global architecture firm NBBJ got a contract to design a pair of buildings in […]

March 13, 2015

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3:30 PM | Manufacturing paper assembled “almost entirely” from someone else’s 1999 thesis
The SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing has retracted a paper after realizing the authors ripped off a 1999 PhD thesis. According to the notice, the 2014 paper — about the best ways to set up manufacturing cells in the automobile industry — “is almost entirely taken” from a Durham University, UK student’s PhD thesis. The thesis, […]The post Manufacturing paper assembled “almost entirely” from someone […]
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6:20 AM | How photosynthesis is inspiring solar power research
SUMMARY: To meet humanity’s growing energy demands, scientists are taking lessons from plants, which perfected the process of capturing the sun’s rays and transforming that into starch. Might scientists be able to adapt the photosynthetic process pioneered by plants and adapt it to meet human demands? The impacts that people have upon the global environment has been a concern to scientists for more than 100 years. These impacts are due, in large part, to the fuels we use. To […]

Barber J. (2007). Biological solar energy, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, 365 1007-1023. DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2006.1962

Porter G. (1950). Flash Photolysis and Spectroscopy. A New Method for the Study of Free Radical Reactions, Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 200 (1061) 284-300. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspa.1950.0018

Porter G. (1966). Studies of Triplet Chlorophyll by Microbeam Flash Photolysis, Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 295 (1440) 1-12. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspa.1966.0222

Porter G. (1978). The Bakerian Lecture, 1977: In Vitro Models for Photosynthesis, Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 362 (1710) 281-303. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspa.1978.0134

Tyndall J. (1861). The Bakerian Lecture: On the Absorption and Radiation of Heat by Gases and Vapours, and on the Physical Connexion of Radiation, Absorption, and Conduction, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 151 1-36. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstl.1861.0001

Cogdell R.J., P. I. Molina & L. Cronin (2013). The use and misuse of photosynthesis in the quest for novel methods to harness solar energy to make fuel, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 371 (1996) 20110603-20110603. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2011.0603

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March 12, 2015

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11:23 PM | Science Spotlight: Fish, Swim Bladders and Boyle's Law
Watch this demonstration of Boyle's Law that shows how changes in pressure affect a fish's swim bladder.

March 11, 2015

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7:50 PM | Chinese Developer Builds 57-Story Skyscraper In Just 19 Days (Time-Lapse Video)
When imagining the timeline for constructing a skyscraper, most people probably think in terms of months or even years. But for the Chinese construction firm Broad Sustainable Building, that’s simply too long. BSB’s newest building, a 57-story tower in Changsha, China, was erected in a mind-blowingly fast 19 days – a rate of three stories per day! BSB Architect Xian Min Zhang released a promotional time-lapse video showing the construction of the J57 tower […]
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3:40 PM | Charting Clean-Energy Paths in New York and Beyond
Digging in on ways to move the clean-energy discussion from menus to outcomes.

March 10, 2015

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6:54 PM | Brain-like Computers from Optical Fibers
Computers that function like a human brain could soon become a reality thanks to new research using optical fibers made of speciality glass. This research has the potential to allow a faster and smarter brain-like computer that can learn and adapt. Researchers from the Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) at the University of Southampton, UK, and […] The post Brain-like Computers from Optical Fibers appeared first on EH Science.

March 09, 2015

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8:56 PM | New, Durable Self-cleaning Surfaces
Put away the polish!  A new paint that creates self-cleaning surfaces has been developed by a research team at University College London. The coating can be applied to clothes, paper, glass and steel. When combined with adhesives, the paint maintains its self-cleaning properties after being wiped, scratched with a knife, and scuffed with sandpaper. Self-cleaning […] The post New, Durable Self-cleaning Surfaces appeared first on EH Science.
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4:19 PM | As Apple Watch Launches, Taking Stock of Competitors and Possibilities
The tech titan's latest device/platform drops into a busy gadget niche that has a big gender gap among early adopters. Still, analysts are expecting more than 10 million sales in the first year.
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