Posts

July 30, 2014

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12:30 AM | A Charming Alphabet Series Explores the ABCs of Rocket Science
NASA is producing an alphabet book of rocket science to unravel the acronym soup surrounding the Orion multipurpose crew vehicle project. The result is a fantastic bit of retro-futuristic art and a perfect reading reading companion for budding geeks.Read more...

July 29, 2014

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11:20 PM | In Australia, money for science is cut, money for religious programs increased
Guest Post by Peter Mc, Australia Australian science body takes a funding hit while extra money is miraculously found for religious education in state schools to the tune of a quarter of a billion dollars. CSIRO cuts space research deeply to find required $114m savings Deep cuts to the CSIRO budget will see up to… Source: Doubtful News
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11:12 AM | The problem with charter schools
Today I read this article written by Allie Gross (hat tip Suresh Naidu), a former Teach for America teacher whose former idealism has long been replaced by her experiences in the reality of education in this country. Her article is entitled The Charter School Profiteers. It’s really important, and really well written, and just one of […]

July 27, 2014

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9:32 PM | Second day
The second day (in Stuttgart) was more math than anything else, obviously. And it was mostly about industrial mathematics. First of all, I need to say that I was never attracted by these things, that seemed a little boring, but … Continue reading →
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5:30 PM | Skepchick Sundaylies: Suggestive Logos, Un-Christian Christians, Mom’s Purse, and the Medical Model of Disability
Categories: Meta StuffTags: AirbnbComeniusDBTdisabilityeducationEscepticagraphic designgrounded parentsimmigrationMad Art Labmedical model of disabilitymental healthmusicParentingpedagogyphysicsReligionresearch fundingSamaritansschool of doubtSkeptabilityspiritualityswaddlingTeen SkepchickThe Great DidacticSunday Funny: Chaos (via xkcd) Teen Skepchick The Physics Philes, lesson 107: The Subjective Side of Physics Mindy explores the physics of sound. DBT Skills: The Benefits of Mindfulness […]
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3:02 PM | Swarm Sunday: 7/20/14 – 7/26/14
We’re still moving along fairly slowly this year.  In the past week, I received reports from the following locations: USA: Bulterville, AK Los Angeles, CA Madison, CT (2 reports) Long Beach, NY Port Washington, WI Canada: Saskatoon, SK And here is the map: Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge! The few […]
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8:00 AM | DNews: Do Nerds Always Need Glasses?
You know the stereotype; people wearing glasses just HAVE to be smart, right? Tara Long examines what connections might exist between intelligence and corrective eyewear.
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12:57 AM | Memory and Summer Math Review
  Dear Friends, Many students believe it’s best to leave their summer math review for the end of the summer; they fear that if they do the work too early they will have forgotten the material again by September. In fact, the best way to make learning stick is to work at it consistently and […]
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12:33 AM | New Study: The More Education You Have, The Slower Your Brain Ages
A group of Danish researchers recently made an interesting discovery about the relationship between our education level and how fast we age. The researchers were led by Eigil Rostrup, who works as a doctor at Denmark’s Glostrup Hospital. The study, published in the journal Human Brain Mapping, was based off of data from a group of 2,400 […]

July 26, 2014

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6:34 PM | Why Calling People Dumb Just Proves Your Own Ignorance
I’m no saint. Just like everyone else, I get frustrated with people from time to time. If you catch me after a particularly maddening encounter, you may hear the words “ignorant”, “bigoted”, “close-minded”, and maybe even “asshole”. But one word you will never hear me use to describe a person is “dumb”. The increasingly popular idea that the […]

July 25, 2014

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8:35 PM | Studies: Students initially complained about healthier school food, but now it’s like totally not a big deal
Nearly two years ago, American schoolchildren began sitting down to healthier school lunches, thanks to new federal nutrition guidelines. Media reports of the nutrition upgrade weren’t terribly encouraging, with stories of unhappy kids, unhappy parents and politicians who think addressing childhood obesity is an example of the “nanny state.” However, recent research has found what most parents probably already know: Kids are pretty adaptable — they just need some time.
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7:24 PM | Technology and Higher Education
When the focus is on student-learning, technology is superior. When the focus is on technology, student-learning is inferior. Technology in higher education is a hot topic across the world, and one […]
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5:30 PM | Before They Were Scientists: Andrea Lucky
Today we take a journey back to middle school with ant biologist and School of Ants co-founder, Andrea Lucky. As a middle school student, she was bored with her suburban Ohio life and yearned for adventures that would get her out into “real nature.” Read on to learn how Andrea hunted for fossils in her backyard, wore a white coat and made rounds in the hospital with her physician mother, and tried, unsuccessfully, to be a sullen teenager. Lea: What was middle school like for you? […]
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5:17 PM | Clients, not customers
Are students customers, or are they just students? Perhaps there's a third way -- to think of them as clients, and faculty as consultants.
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3:22 PM | Why The Most Important Educational Instruction Comes Before First Grade (Infographic)
When we talk about educational inequality in our country and the poor conditions of public schools in low income areas, we tend to focus on middle schools and high schools, and their inability to reach “troubled” youth. This is definitely an important aspect of the problem, but the issues start much, much earlier. One of the […]
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2:00 PM | Get Energized by KQED’s New E-books and iTunes U Course
Think you know all there is to know about energy? Buff up your energy awareness and knowledge with KQED's new e-book and iTunes U course.
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10:59 AM | Nerding out: RSA on an iPython Notebook
Yesterday was a day filled with secrets and codes. In the morning, at The Platform, we had guest speaker Columbia history professor Matthew Connelly, who came and talked to us about his work with declassified documents. Two big and slightly depressing take-aways for me were the following: As records have become digitized, it has gotten […]
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8:00 AM | Draw Me a Picture of Nature
The literary critic Raymond Williams once wrote that “Nature is perhaps the most complex word in the language.” It’s a head-scratcher right up there with love, or goodness: We depend on it for survival, but we’re often not quite sure where it is, what it is, or whether we’re a part of it. Jessica Mikels-Carrasco, […]
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8:00 AM | Draw Me a Picture of Nature
The literary critic Raymond Williams once wrote that “Nature is perhaps the most complex word in the language.” It’s a head-scratcher right up there with love, or goodness: We depend on it for survival, but we’re often not quite sure where it is, what it is, or whether we’re a part of it. Jessica Mikels-Carrasco, […]

July 24, 2014

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6:00 PM | Want to support #education? Donate to Tumblr Teachers' Classrooms!
positivelypersistentteach: Dear Tumblrverse, Before the explanation part of this post, I need to say this so it will be in posts that are shortened by a reblog: More than anything I ask that you reblog this post so that kind millionaires  more people will see it and more support can be given.   All the Amazon wishlists and blogs are linked below the read more link! As the new school year approaches, we are obviously in denial teachers are mentally figuring out […]
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1:43 PM | Sanford-Burnham commends summer 2014 high-school researchers
On July 18, eleven students from The Preuss School UCSD celebrated the completion of an intensive two-week summer research program with a poster symposium and luncheon at our La Jolla, Calif., campus.
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1:11 PM | The Physicists of Journalism
This Alberto Cairo piece on “data journalism” has been kicking around for a while, and it’s taken me a while to pin down what bugs me about it. I think my problem with it ultimately has to do with the first two section headers in which he identifies problems with FiveThirtyEight and Vox: 1. Data…
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1:10 PM | Ecological Landscape Design for Urban Biodiversity, Ecological Education and Nature Restoration in Kyushu, Japan
We have been designing a school garden, river bank, urban forest and city parks over the last 12 years. I’ve written about school garden and city park design project in former articles. The aim of these projects are to create areas for … Continue reading →

July 23, 2014

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1:59 PM | How to Lose a Finger, and Other Things I Learned from Darwin’s Library
It’s always a good idea to bring reading material on your trips, whether you plan to have some airport downtime or you’re spending five years floating on the ocean. When Charles Darwin departed in 1831 for his trip around the world on the HMS Beagle, he had a well-stocked library. But the collection wasn’t saved, and […]The post How to Lose a Finger, and Other Things I Learned from Darwin’s Library appeared first on Inkfish.
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11:29 AM | How to think like a microeconomist
Yesterday we were pleased to have Suresh Naidu guest lecture in The Platform. He came in and explained, very efficiently because he was leaving at 11am for a flight at noon at LGA (which he made!!) how to think like an economist. Or at least an applied microeconomist. Here are his notes: Applied microeconomics is basically […]
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9:29 AM | Lies, damned lies, and Ofsted’s pseudostatistics
It’s been a week since Michael Gove was unceremoniously given the boot from his role as Education Secretary. The cheers of teachers still echo around staff rooms and schoolyards up and down the country. Gove was variously described as incredibly unpopular, a hate figure, utterly ruthless, and a “toxic liability”. And that was just by […] The post Lies, damned lies, and Ofsted’s pseudostatistics appeared first on physicsfocus.org.

July 22, 2014

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11:28 PM | Uncertain Dots 19
In which our hangout turns nineteen; we may need to look into a special guest for the 20th, or something. Or maybe save guest stars for the one after that, when it can drink. Anyway, Rhett and I chat about grading, lab reports, why Excel sucks, and an online experiment that we really ought to…
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9:20 PM | “I’m busy” is a euphemism
I’ve read a couple articles about how we all get caught up in being so busy.  A lot of them talk about how we need to escape the busyness spiral.  Xykademiqz expressed frustration with people who are always busy. I guess I’m coming at it from a different angle. I’ve come to realize that the phrase […]
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5:12 PM | Flipped Learning in Higher Education
Flipped learning is an approach to setting up the learning environment that has gained much support within the pre-university schooling system. Brian Bennett from Techsmith (he used to teach and […]
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4:44 PM | Challenges of teaching Biochemistry to Health Sciences students
Had anyone told me, 20 years ago, that I would earn my living as a lecturer, I would have considered it as a put-down. I did have a lot of respect and appreciation for (most of) my lecturers at the University of Porto, but I expected to become a full-time scientist, rather than a "lecturer who finds time to do some science in-between classes/grading" or a "researcher with required part-time lecturing duties". Real life disabused me of that expectation: due to the dearth of other scientific jobs […]
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