Posts

July 27, 2014

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6:17 PM | Holy Grail of Battery Design: A lithium anode
Technology has been racing forward at an ever increasing rate. Unfortunately, anyone who owns a smartphone will tell you that the battery life doesn’t match the advancements. That is probably […]

Liu N, Lu Z, Zhao J, McDowell MT, Lee HW, Zhao W & Cui Y (2014). A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes., Nature nanotechnology, 9 (3) 187-92. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24531496

Citation
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6:17 PM | Holy Grail of Battery Design: A lithium anode
Technology has been racing forward at an ever increasing rate. Unfortunately, anyone who owns a smartphone will tell you that the battery life doesn’t match the advancements. That is probably […]

Liu N, Lu Z, Zhao J, McDowell MT, Lee HW, Zhao W & Cui Y (2014). A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes., Nature nanotechnology, 9 (3) 187-92. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24531496

Citation

July 26, 2014

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8:02 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 25/07/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Star Wars […]
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8:02 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 25/07/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Star Wars […]

July 25, 2014

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8:17 PM | The Fall and Rise of the Amphibian Empire
In 1970, a group of experts on frogs, toads, salamanders, and caecilians noticed that populations of the Yosemite Park Toad in California had suddenly crashed. The habitat was suitable, there seemed to be nothing wrong but their numbers had crashed to very low levels. People scratched their heads and thought of it as just one…
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6:55 PM | Tracking and combatting our current mass extinction
We're trying to save bird and mammal species, but we may need to replace them.
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4:16 PM | University of Chicago opens first Passive House-certified laboratory in North America
UChicago's new ecological field station in Southwestern Michigan raises the bar for sustainable and energy-efficient educational facilities.
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11:09 AM | The Kingdom of Rarities by Eric Dinerstein – review
Why are some species naturally rare whilst others are common? Do rare species make any difference in the larger scheme? These questions have puzzled biologists for centuries. Truth be told, even today, scientists have uncovered just a few pieces within this complex puzzle as we discover in Eric Dinerstein's The Kingdom of Rarities [Island Press, 2014; Amazon UK; Amazon US/kindle US]. In this engaging and informative narrative, the reader accompanies the World Wildlife Fund's chief scientist on […]
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11:09 AM | The Kingdom of Rarities by Eric Dinerstein – review
Why are some species naturally rare whilst others are common? Do rare species make any difference in the larger scheme? These questions have puzzled biologists for centuries. Truth be told, even today, scientists have uncovered just a few pieces within this complex puzzle as we discover in Eric Dinerstein's The Kingdom of Rarities [Island Press, 2014; Amazon UK; Amazon US/kindle US]. In this engaging and informative narrative, the reader accompanies the World Wildlife Fund's chief scientist on […]
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11:09 AM | The Kingdom of Rarities by Eric Dinerstein – review
Why are some species naturally rare whilst others are common? Do rare species make any difference in the larger scheme? These questions have puzzled biologists for centuries. Truth be told, even today, scientists have uncovered just a few pieces within this complex puzzle as we discover in Eric Dinerstein's The Kingdom of Rarities [Island Press, 2014; Amazon UK; Amazon US/kindle US]. In this engaging and informative narrative, the reader accompanies the World Wildlife Fund's chief scientist on […]

July 24, 2014

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8:50 PM | It's not just extinction: meet defaunation
Get ready to learn a new word: defaunation. Fauna is the total collection of animals—both in terms of species diversity and abundance—in a given area. So, defaunation, much like deforestation, means the loss of animals in all its myriad forms, including extinction, extirpation, or population declines.
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8:26 PM | Can we predict evolution?
Is evolution random, or predictable? But Gould had a deeper question in mind as he wrote his book. If you knew everything about life on Earth half a billion years ago, could you predict that humans would eventually evolve? Gould thought not. He even doubted that scientists could safely predict that any vertebrates would still […]
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11:00 AM | Microbial to Human Cell Ratio: Just Bragging Rights?
by Jeffrey L. Fox | Microbiota buffs repeat it often these days, proudly reminding the public that the microbial cells associated with humans outnumber their host cells by a ratio of ten-to-one. In his letter in the February 2014 Microbe, however, Judah L. Rosner of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) makes a strong case for…
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10:55 AM | #okavango14: Over Africa’s Wetland Wilderness
Africa's newly-minted UNESCO World Heritage Site, Botswana's Okavango Delta, from the air and from space... This emerald green oasis buzzes with life during the summer months when grand thunderstorms sweep across the delta...

July 23, 2014

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11:00 PM | helicobacter pylori and the complexity of the human microbiome
In their first-year microbiology lectures. our students hear about Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium associated with the development of gastric ulcers (a discovery that eventually saw Barry Marshall and Robin Warren receive the 2005 Nobel Prize for Physology or Medicine)....
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8:38 PM | A Tahitian Welcome for the Worldwide Voyage
The Worldwide Voyage received a colorful and memorable welcome to Tahiti, which Hōkūle‘a crew member Ana Yawaramai writes about from her own perspective.
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7:59 PM | Western Mediterranean Island Conservation
I am visiting the Iberian Peninsula this week en route to the 14th Rodens et Spatium conference in Portugal. Today in Valencia I am looking out over the Western Mediterranean basin. This area is steeped in human history, including upon its hundreds of islands. Romans colonised these parts over 2,000 years ago, and like everywhere…

July 22, 2014

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7:23 PM | Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About
This post is the first in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during his travels.   The idea for this new column came up as I was staring at a small fur seal puppy playing…
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3:16 PM | Bats Use Polarized Light to Set Their Internal Magnetic Compasses
Although bats are known for using echolocation to orient and navigate, they draw on a suite of senses to get around. A new study reveals another ability: bats use patterns of polarized light in the sky to navigate. Read about the experiment in my latest Zoologic post: Bats Use Polarized Light to Set Their Internal Compasses .
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3:07 PM | Tatooine’s tangled bank – plants evolve in a galaxy far, far away
“It is interesting to contemplate a tangled dune, clothed with many plants of many kinds, all produced by laws acting around us. There is grandeur in this view of life, where so unforgiving an environment has taken but one common ancestor, and, over the millennia, forged such marvellous forms most beautiful. That this should occur, as it does elsewhere, in such an inhospitable place, speaks to the power and the universality of evolution – a creative force that that exceeds... Read […]
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3:07 PM | Tatooine’s tangled bank – plants evolve in a galaxy far, far away
“It is interesting to contemplate a tangled dune, clothed with many plants of many kinds, all produced by laws acting around us. There is grandeur in this view of life, where so unforgiving an environment has taken but one common ancestor, and, over the millennia, forged such marvellous forms most beautiful. That this should occur, as it does elsewhere, in such an inhospitable place, speaks to the power and the universality of evolution – a creative force that that exceeds... Read […]
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3:47 AM | Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #71
Woodpeckers, nutcrackers, flycatchers, sunbirds, roadrunners and babblers in this 71st Edition! Astonishing what can be achieved with a bit of patience, care and a passion for birds. Wild birds have become the subject of choice for thousands of photographers around the world. They extremely hard to photograph. You need the best equipment you have access to…

July 21, 2014

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6:40 PM | Sixth Grader's Science Fair Project Rattles Ecologists
By showing that lionfish can live in fresh water, 12 year-old Lauren Arrington has alerted ecologists to the potential for these fish to migrate upstream in rivers where they would pose a threat to the ecosystem.Read more...
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2:13 PM | Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe
Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.
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1:39 PM | When the Microbe Hits the Metal
by Leo Baumgart | Some heavy metals share a long history with microbes. Many of the metabolic processes that sustain life are believed to have originated from spontaneous reactions involving metals present in the early Earth. Our microbial ancestors figured out quickly how to use...
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12:00 PM | Climate Change Already Having Profound Impacts on Lakes in Europe
For perspective on how climate change is affecting lakes, those of us here in the U.S. can just look across the pond, where scientists and the agencies involved in meeting the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic. Not only are extreme weather events such as droughts…

July 19, 2014

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10:04 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 18/07/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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10:04 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 18/07/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

July 17, 2014

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8:33 PM | Naked mole rats, star-nosed moles, and tentacled snakes: the research of Ken Catania
A classic paper about Naked Mole Rats was passed around on twitter recently and I thought that it would be a good time to revisit some of the greatest hits of Ken Catania, wonder neuroethologist. There is tons of interesting neuroscience questions that pertain to the strange animals you’ll find in the wild but very […]
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6:00 PM | “Gene Drives” and CRISPR Could Revolutionize Ecosystem Management
A note from the authors: With this guest blog post we want to share the key features of an innovative method for the high-precision genome editing of wild populations that has been outlined by our... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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