Posts

October 31, 2014

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7:23 PM | Meet Afghanistan's Elusive, Endangered "Vampire" Deer
This is a male musk deer, knowing for growing fangs during the breeding season. A recent survey by the Wildlife Conservation Society confirmed that Kashmir musk deer, one of seven related Asian species, still live in Afghanistan's Nuristan Province, some 60 years after its last recorded sighting.Read more...
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4:30 PM | The U.S. Is Spending $4.5-Million To Save The Rarest Fish On Earth
The (4.5-) million dollar question is: Should it be?Read more...
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2:57 AM | The ScienceArt Exhibit Roundup This Fall
So much good scienceart on display… where to begin!? EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain C-Gates station... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

October 30, 2014

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7:52 PM | EPA Refines Pollution Rules
Last week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was told by a federal appeals court that it could move forward with implementing a program to curb air pollution that crosses state lines. The Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CASPR) would require 28 states to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide by power plants.…
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3:38 PM | Poorer Nations Are Growing Renewables Nearly Twice as Fast as Richer Ones
According to a new study from Climatescope, developing nations are far outpacing developed ones when it comes to the installation of new renewable energy infrastructure. The study monitored 55 developing countries, including emerging economies like China, Brazil, South Africa, India and Kenya, and found that between the years of 2008-2013, developing nations saw 143% growth in renewable energy, versus only 84% in developed countries. The Climatescope project was originally […]
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3:16 PM | The Search for Lost Frogs: one of conservation's most exciting expeditions comes to life in new book
One of the most exciting conservation initiatives in recent years was the Search for Lost Frogs in 2010. The brainchild of scientist, photographer, and frog-lover, Robin Moore, the initiative brought a sense of hope—and excitement—to a whole group of animals often ignored by the global public—and media outlets. Now, Moore has written a fascinating account of the expedition: In Search of Lost Frogs.
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2:25 PM | Trick-or-Treating With Predators: Who is the Candy Bar of the Prairie?
Predators trick-or-treating across the northern plains are on the look out for their favorite full-sized candy bar. In a new video released this week, hear from our American Prairie Reserve biologists, Kyran and Damien, as they talk about the crucial role that these miniature snacks play in the larger ecosystem. Watch as hungry badgers go door to door —…
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2:25 PM | Trick-or-Treating With Predators: Who is the Candy Bar of the Prairie?
Predators trick-or-treating across the northern plains are on the look out for their favorite full-sized candy bar. In a new video released this week, hear from our American Prairie Reserve biologists, Kyran and Damien, as they talk about the crucial role that these miniature snacks play in the larger ecosystem. Watch as hungry badgers go door to door —…
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2:25 PM | The Fish That Inspired a Woman to Help Save a Species
Shana Miller was fresh out of college in 1998 when she came face-to-face with one of the fastest fish in the sea. She and her friends battled for three hours to haul a 154-pound bluefin tuna aboard their boat off the Maryland coast. And when she finally looked the creature in the eye, she felt…
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1:57 PM | Resourceful Crustaceans Turn Invasive Seaweed into Homes
When a new developer comes to town and starts aggressively building up the empty property around your home, you can get mad—or you can move in. That’s what tiny crustaceans in the Georgia mudflats have done. Facing an invasive Japanese seaweed, they’ve discovered that it makes excellent shelter, protecting them from all kinds of threats. […]The post Resourceful Crustaceans Turn Invasive Seaweed into Homes appeared first on Inkfish.

Wright, J., Byers, J., DeVore, J. & Sotka, E. (2014). Engineering or food? mechanisms of facilitation by a habitat-forming invasive seaweed, Ecology, 95 (10) 2699-2706. DOI: 10.1890/14-0127.1

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1:01 PM | Rare American warbler surprises scientists by adapting, thriving in a new ecosystem
When Gary Graves cranks up his boom box and drives remote back roads through pine plantations in Texas, Louisiana and other southern states, a few […] The post Rare American warbler surprises scientists by adapting, thriving in a new ecosystem appeared first on Smithsonian Science.

October 29, 2014

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9:44 PM | World Youth Rhino Summit: Future conservationists rally for...
World Youth Rhino Summit: Future conservationists rally for rhinos From Jane Goodall to Bear Grylls, high-profile figures in the world of wildlife conservation shared their voices for the first-ever World Youth Rhino Summit in South Africa to inspire a new generation of conservationists-in-the-making to fight for the future survival of the world’s remaining rhino species. This powerful video shown at the summit was the call to action for those attending. For more on the summit, please […]
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6:56 PM | More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year
The United States National Marine Fisheries Service just released the 2013 “fisheries of the United States” report. The extremely detailed report contains lots of important information on both recreational and commercial fisheries in U.S. waters, and I recommend giving it a thorough read. I noticed an interesting detail about the U.S. shark fishery, though. In 2013, more large (non-dogfish) sharks […]
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1:46 PM | The greater good: animal welfare vs. conservation
Andrew Wright is a British marine biologist that has been working on the science-policy boundary around the world for over a decade. His experiences have led him to champion a better communication of science to policy makers and the lay public. His research has included a population viability analysis for the vaquita, sperm whales bioacoustics […]

October 28, 2014

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10:06 PM | Rapa Expedition: Diving the Marotiri Maelstrom
Kike Ballesteros and Alan Friedlander dive the dangerous and unpredictable Marotiri Shoals, battling the elements to collect scientific data. Curious onlookers, in the form of large predators, come to join them.
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8:59 PM | Rapa Expedition: Human Impacts on Wild Sharks
With many sharks sighted in Marotiri with fishing hooks protruding from their bodies, it seems that almost nothing is untouched by man. However, human impact can also be positive—will the Expedition be able to help these sharks?
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8:56 PM | Rapa Expedition: What Do Sharks Do When We’re Not Looking?
To film animal behavior out of the view of human eyes, the team deploys cameras to drift in the open ocean and record whatever comes their way.
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8:55 PM | Fighting the fur trade, giant spiders & a devastating rhino...
Fighting the fur trade, giant spiders & a devastating rhino death Time to catch up on some devastating rhino news, give your arachnophobia a boost, add your voice to an anti-fur campaign, get a little dose of sloth cuteness and stand a chance to win a sparkly prize. By: Earth Touch.
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8:11 PM | Scientists resurrect 700-year-old viruses, Just in time for Halloween!
You know how some zombie movies start with a discovery of a virus, it gets loose, and things quickly spiral out of control from that? Well in breaking news a […]

Ng, T., Chen, L., Zhou, Y., Shapiro, B., Stiller, M., Heintzman, P., Varsani, A., Kondov, N., Wong, W., Deng, X. & Andrews, T. (2014). Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a subarctic ice patch, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410429111

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8:11 PM | Scientists resurrect 700-year-old viruses, Just in time for Halloween!
You know how some zombie movies start with a discovery of a virus, it gets loose, and things quickly spiral out of control from that? Well in breaking news a […]

Ng, T., Chen, L., Zhou, Y., Shapiro, B., Stiller, M., Heintzman, P., Varsani, A., Kondov, N., Wong, W., Deng, X. & Andrews, T. (2014). Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a subarctic ice patch, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410429111

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8:11 PM | Scientists resurrect 700-year-old viruses, Just in time for Halloween!
You know how some zombie movies start with a discovery of a virus, it gets loose, and things quickly spiral out of control from that? Well in breaking news a […]

Ng, T., Chen, L., Zhou, Y., Shapiro, B., Stiller, M., Heintzman, P., Varsani, A., Kondov, N., Wong, W., Deng, X. & Andrews, T. (2014). Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a subarctic ice patch, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410429111

Citation
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8:11 PM | Scientists resurrect 700-year-old viruses, Just in time for Halloween!
You know how some zombie movies start with a discovery of a virus, it gets loose, and things quickly spiral out of control from that? Well in breaking news a […]

Ng, T., Chen, L., Zhou, Y., Shapiro, B., Stiller, M., Heintzman, P., Varsani, A., Kondov, N., Wong, W., Deng, X. & Andrews, T. (2014). Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a subarctic ice patch, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410429111

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6:50 PM | Bird-friendly coffee plantations are mammal friendly as well, study shows
Scientists have long known that in the tropics shade-grown coffee plantations provide critical habitat for migratory and resident birds. Now a new survey conducted in […] The post Bird-friendly coffee plantations are mammal friendly as well, study shows appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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6:50 PM | Don't Let Your Halloween Candy Kill Orangutans
Sumatra and Borneo are the only places in the world where orangutans – the so-called "red apes" – live in the wild. Both species are endangered, the Sumatran one critically so. And your Halloween candy could be, at least in part, to blame.Read more...
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5:45 PM | Australia's Plan Won't Save Great Barrier Reef: Scientists
The government's plans to protect the Great Barrier Reef can't prevent its decline, the country's pre-eminent grouping of natural scientists said Tuesday.
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2:58 PM | Measure for measure, number 5
I generally am not afraid to discuss politics in person, but I don’t do it often here.  I will discuss topics that can be politicized but seldom delve directly into politics, particularly of the local variety.  The reason is that I don’t want to irritate my neighbors.  However, in viewing my site stats, I’ve realized […]
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1:51 PM | Tagged Dolphins Adjust by Swimming Slowly
Scientists love the data they get by attaching electronic tags to animals, but these devices can be a literal drag. For animals that fly or swim, tags can mess up their mechanics and force them to spend more energy. That’s what scientists expected to see when they studied dolphins with data loggers suction-cupped to their […]The post Tagged Dolphins Adjust by Swimming Slowly appeared first on Inkfish.

van der Hoop JM, Fahlman A, Hurst T, Rocho-Levine J, Shorter KA, Petrov V & Moore MJ (2014). Bottlenose dolphins modify behavior to reduce metabolic effect of tag attachment., The Journal of experimental biology, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25324344

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12:14 PM | Jane Goodall and John Oliver Debate Putting Hats on Chimps
By Susan Cosier We all know biologist Jane Goodall spent years of her youth living with chimpanzees in the forests of Tanzania. But did she ever try to put a monocle and top hat on one of them? Comedian John Oliver—never one to shy away from the tough questions—got to the bottom of wild primate behavior in his interview with one of conservation’s favorite ladies. For over 50 years, Goodall’s chimpanzee research has helped us protect […]

October 27, 2014

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11:06 PM | October 26, 2014: Give a Turtle CPR, Climb Yosemite’s Most Iconic Peaks, and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb all of the world's tallest mountains, write travel stories, pack for a purpose, give a turtle CPR, set records in the Yosemite Valley, find early humans where you don't expect to, map the Earth, the oceans and Mars, and harvest GMOs.
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7:40 PM | Real Zombie-Making Parasites Among Us
The mummified cat and the rat in the crypt of Christ Church in Dublin. Photo by Adrian Grycuk at Wikimedia Commons.The Happening, M. Night Shyamalan’s worst panned movie of all time, is a science fiction thriller about people going into a mysterious trance and committing suicide as a result of other mind-hacking species. One of the leading criticisms raised against this movie is the ridiculousness of the premise. One species can’t cause another to willingly commit suicide! […]

Kaushik, M., Knowles, S. & Webster, J. (2014). What Makes a Feline Fatal in Toxoplasma gondii's Fatal Feline Attraction? Infected Rats Choose Wild Cats, Integrative and Comparative Biology, 54 (2) 118-128. DOI: 10.1093/icb/icu060

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