Posts

August 29, 2014

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5:28 PM | Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning
This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…
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5:28 PM | Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning
This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…
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3:48 AM | A Map to Build Roads to a Better Future
When I learned that the pesticide DDT–widely toxic and now widely banned–has snaked its way into polar bears and beluga whales, I questioned if any environment remains pristine on terrestrial Earth. Perhaps, the thick, hostile and unyielding rainforests of Borneo might prove a bastion? Then in 2013, satellite images showed roads penetrating deep into Borneo. […]

Laurance, W., Clements, G., Sloan, S., O’Connell, C., Mueller, N., Goosem, M., Venter, O., Edwards, D., Phalan, B., Balmford, A. & Van Der Ree, R. (2014). A global strategy for road building, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature13717

Citation
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3:48 AM | A Map to Build Roads to a Better Future
When I learned that the pesticide DDT–widely toxic and now widely banned–has snaked its way into polar bears and beluga whales, I questioned if any environment remains pristine on terrestrial Earth. Perhaps, the thick, hostile and unyielding rainforests of Borneo might prove a bastion? Then in 2013, satellite images showed roads penetrating deep into Borneo. […]

Laurance, W., Clements, G., Sloan, S., O’Connell, C., Mueller, N., Goosem, M., Venter, O., Edwards, D., Phalan, B., Balmford, A. & Van Der Ree, R. (2014). A global strategy for road building, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature13717

Citation
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3:48 AM | A Map to Build Roads to a Better Future
When I learned that the pesticide DDT–widely toxic and now widely banned–has snaked its way into polar bears and beluga whales, I questioned if any environment remains pristine on terrestrial Earth. Perhaps, the thick, hostile and unyielding rainforests of Borneo might prove a bastion? Then in 2013, satellite images showed roads penetrating deep into Borneo. […]

Laurance, W., Clements, G., Sloan, S., O’Connell, C., Mueller, N., Goosem, M., Venter, O., Edwards, D., Phalan, B., Balmford, A. & Van Der Ree, R. (2014). A global strategy for road building, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature13717

Citation

August 28, 2014

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5:54 PM | #Okavango14: Listen to the Sound of a Golden Okavango Morning
Listen to the sounds of a morning in the Okavango River Delta, courtesy of Steve Boyes and the Okavango Expedition!
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2:00 AM | Whale-watching is not as harmless as it appears.
Whale-watching is not as harmless as it appears. Conservationists say whales are stressed out by the frequent boat trips, which affects their behavior and puts their long-term survival at risk. As many as 13 million people flock to the oceans each year in hopes of seeing whales and dolphins up close. Read more...

August 27, 2014

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9:39 PM | Climate change research roundup: hiding heat in the Atlantic and the Arctic carbon cycle
The most recent issue of Science has two new reports on the so-called global warming hiatus and the carbon cycle in the Arctic, both of which are central to discussions of climate change and where temperature increases are being seen around … Continue reading →

Cory, R., Ward, C., Crump, B. & Kling, G. (2014). Sunlight controls water column processing of carbon in arctic fresh waters, Science, 345 (6199) 925-928. DOI: 10.1126/science.1253119

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6:52 PM | The Gran Canal: will Nicaragua's big bet create prosperity or environmental ruin?
A hundred years ago, the Panama Canal reshaped global geography. Now a new project, spearheaded by a media-shy Chinese millionaire, wants to build a 278-kilometer canal through Nicaragua. While the government argues the mega-project will change the country's dire economic outlook overnight, critics contend it will cause undue environmental damage, upend numerous communities, and do little to help local people.
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12:42 PM | A Year Ago Today: Spring in South Africa
National Geographic Young Explorer Evan Eifler is working to preserve the endangered ecosystems of South Africa, most notably the renosterveld. Check out the amazing images he has captured of endangered and unique flowers.
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11:57 AM | Q&A: Landmark Report Reveals Crucial Links in the Illegal Ivory Trade
While there are effectively unlimited numbers of poachers and consumers fueling the lucrative illegal ivory market, a new report suggests that nearly all the ivory shuttled from Africa to Asia—the biggest market—is confined to as few as 200 shipping containers a year. This “transit or supply chain is the single greatest point of vulnerability in…

August 26, 2014

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8:18 PM | How do we save the world's vanishing old-growth forests?
There's nothing in the world like a primary forest, which has never been industrially logged or cleared by humans. They are often described as cathedral-like, due to pillar-like trees and carpet-like undergrowth. Yet, the world's primary forests—also known as old-growth forests—are falling every year, and policy-makers are not doing enough to stop it.
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5:08 PM | August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger's couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.
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5:08 PM | August 24, 2014: How to Survive a Deadly Avalanche, Remembering Fallen War Reporters in Song and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they survive an avalanche while skiing in Washington, save the environment while winning the Stanley Cup, uncover the tombs of powerful women in the Andes, pay tribute to a pair of fallen war correspondents, sleep on a stranger's couch, herd reindeer in the Russian arctic, and hold the jaws of crocodiles while we test just how hard they can bite.
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5:07 PM | 4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters
The ultimate "canaries in the coal mine," these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.
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5:07 PM | 4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters
The ultimate "canaries in the coal mine," these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

August 25, 2014

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9:00 PM | Welcoming Hōkūle’a to American Samoa With Dr. Sylvia Earle
Daniel Lin and Dr. Sylvia Earle (National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence) team up to write about their experience of greeting Hōkūle'a and Hikianalia in American Samoa, and to reflect on the health of the ocean there.
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7:44 PM | The Highest Conservation Price
In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…
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7:44 PM | The Highest Conservation Price
In all the money that is devoted to the conservation of the most charismatic species, there is one that has been lifted far above what I thought was the highest plateau of funds devoted to conservation. You might at first think of the Giant Panda. You, however, as I was, would be wrong; although millions…
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12:00 AM | Nets that save fish: Ocean bycatch isn’t inevitable — it’s a...
Nets that save fish: Ocean bycatch isn’t inevitable — it’s a design challenge. Technology, you’re doing it right. 
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12:00 AM | Nets that save fish: Ocean bycatch isn’t inevitable — it’s a...
Nets that save fish: Ocean bycatch isn’t inevitable — it’s a design challenge. Technology, you’re doing it right. 

August 24, 2014

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10:26 PM | Mosquitoes on the move: climate change and its effect on vector-born diseases
If you live in Florida, like I do, you come to truly fear and loathe these guys: the Aedes albopictus, better known as the tiger mosquito.  Or any other mosquito, for that matter.  In the US, we actually have it … Continue reading →

Bouzid, M., Colón-González, F., Lung, T., Lake, I. & Hunter, P. (2014). Climate change and the emergence of vector-borne diseases in Europe: case study of dengue fever, BMC Public Health, 14 (1) 781. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-781

Citation
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10:26 PM | Mosquitoes on the move: climate change and its effect on vector-born diseases
If you live in Florida, like I do, you come to truly fear and loathe these guys: the Aedes albopictus, better known as the tiger mosquito.  Or any other mosquito, for that matter.  In the US, we actually have it … Continue reading →

Bouzid, M., Colón-González, F., Lung, T., Lake, I. & Hunter, P. (2014). Climate change and the emergence of vector-borne diseases in Europe: case study of dengue fever, BMC Public Health, 14 (1) 781. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-781

Citation
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6:40 PM | This Is The Mating Dance Of The Greater Sage-Grouse, An Imperiled Bird
BEHOLD ITS SPIKY TAIL FEATHERS. GAZE UPON ITS GALLANT NECK-SACS.Read more...
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5:33 PM | Scientists name new endangered species after the company that will decide its fate
Scientists have discovered a new snail species near a cement quarry in Malaysia, which as far as they know lives nowhere else in the world. It lives on a limestone hill called Kanthan given as a concession to an international company Lafarge. The cement producer quarries the hill for raw materials. As a result, the scientists have named the species after the company that will decide if it goes extinct.
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1:31 PM | This Month in Blastocystis Research (AUG 2014)
Some August highlights in Blastocystis research:1) The PRE-IOPCA Molecular Parasitology Workshop took place from the 7-10 August at CINVESTAV, Mexico City. Top-motivated students from some 10-15 countries worked hard from 7 am to 7 pm in dry+wet lab sessions, and we all had a really great time, thanks to both participants and fantastic organisers. There was a 4 h session on Blastocystis molecular epidemiology, and I was pleased to learn that some of the participants currently work with (or plan […]

Fayer R, Elsasser T, Gould R, Solano G, Urban J Jr & Santin M (2014). Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine., Parasitology research, 113 (4) 1465-72. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24535732

Klimeš V, Gentekaki E, Roger AJ & Eliáš M (2014). A large number of nuclear genes in the human parasite blastocystis require mRNA polyadenylation to create functional termination codons., Genome biology and evolution, 6 (8) 1956-61. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25015079

Hanage, W. (2014). Microbiology: Microbiome science needs a healthy dose of scepticism, Nature, 512 (7514) 247-248. DOI: 10.1038/512247a

Scanlan PD, Stensvold CR, Rajilić-Stojanović M, Heilig HG, De Vos WM, O'Toole PW & Cotter PD (2014). The microbial eukaryote Blastocystis is a prevalent and diverse member of the healthy human gut microbiota., FEMS microbiology ecology, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077936

Venton, D. (2014). Highlight: Not Like a Textbook--Nuclear Genes in Blastocystis Use mRNA Polyadenylation for Stop Codons, Genome Biology and Evolution, 6 (8) 1962-1963. DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evu167

Wang W, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H, Traub RJ, Cuttell L & Owen H (2014). Location and pathogenic potential of blastocystis in the porcine intestine., PloS one, 9 (8) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25093578

Citation
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1:31 PM | This Month in Blastocystis Research (AUG 2014)
Some August highlights in Blastocystis research:1) The PRE-IOPCA Molecular Parasitology Workshop took place from the 7-10 August at CINVESTAV, Mexico City. Top-motivated students from some 10-15 countries worked hard from 7 am to 7 pm in dry+wet lab sessions, and we all had a really great time, thanks to both participants and fantastic organisers. There was a 4 h session on Blastocystis molecular epidemiology, and I was pleased to learn that some of the participants currently work with (or plan […]

Fayer R, Elsasser T, Gould R, Solano G, Urban J Jr & Santin M (2014). Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine., Parasitology research, 113 (4) 1465-72. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24535732

Klimeš V, Gentekaki E, Roger AJ & Eliáš M (2014). A large number of nuclear genes in the human parasite blastocystis require mRNA polyadenylation to create functional termination codons., Genome biology and evolution, 6 (8) 1956-61. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25015079

Hanage, W. (2014). Microbiology: Microbiome science needs a healthy dose of scepticism, Nature, 512 (7514) 247-248. DOI: 10.1038/512247a

Scanlan PD, Stensvold CR, Rajilić-Stojanović M, Heilig HG, De Vos WM, O'Toole PW & Cotter PD (2014). The microbial eukaryote Blastocystis is a prevalent and diverse member of the healthy human gut microbiota., FEMS microbiology ecology, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077936

Venton, D. (2014). Highlight: Not Like a Textbook--Nuclear Genes in Blastocystis Use mRNA Polyadenylation for Stop Codons, Genome Biology and Evolution, 6 (8) 1962-1963. DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evu167

Wang W, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H, Traub RJ, Cuttell L & Owen H (2014). Location and pathogenic potential of blastocystis in the porcine intestine., PloS one, 9 (8) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25093578

Citation

August 23, 2014

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11:51 PM | View from Kinshasa: Minerals and Development in the Democratic Republic of Congo
From 2000 to 2005, I was asked to teach an annual module in environmental conflict resolution at a program for mid-career professionals from developing countries held at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme (funded by the Henry R. Luce Foundation). In one of the earlier…
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10:47 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 22/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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10:47 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 22/08/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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