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Posts

April 14, 2014

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7:59 PM | Airborne Wind Turbines Have Significant Potential, Study Finds
Airborne wind turbines hovering high in the air and tethered to the ground, like kites, have the potential to generate huge amounts of electricity, based on a recent wind availability study led by the University of Delaware. Read more »

Archer, C., Delle Monache, L. & Rife, D. (2014). Airborne wind energy: Optimal locations and variability, Renewable Energy, 64 180-186. DOI:

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3:45 AM | Big data, prediction, and scientism in the social sciences
Much of my undergrad was spent studying physics, and although I still think that a physics background is great for a theorists in any field, there are some downsides. For example, I used to make jokes like: “soft isn’t the opposite of hard sciences, easy is.” Thankfully, over the years I have started to slowly […]

Lazer, D., Kennedy, R., King, G. & Vespignani, A. (2014). Big data. The parable of Google Flu: traps in big data analysis., Science, 343 (6176) 1203-1205. PMID:

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April 13, 2014

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5:00 PM | Skepchick Sundaylies: Computer Gamer, Silent Spring, and Doodling Dongs
Categories: Meta StuffTags: aspergersbook reviewbulliescarl saganCommon Corecomputer scienceCrazy StoneDemon-Haunted WorldeducationEscepticagame designGogrounded parentsinternet memesMad Art LabRachel Carsonschool of doubtScienceSciFri Science Clubsilent springsocial justicesocial mediaSunday FunniesTeen SkepchickwavesWorld Homeopathy DaySunday Funnies: Adventures of Not-All-Man! (via Please Listen to Me); Girl Pants (via Sociological Images and Dumbing of Age) Teen Skepchick Science Sunday: Go […]

April 10, 2014

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8:29 PM | Registration is now open for New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians
Registration for the 2014 New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians is now open. This year’s Science Boot Camp will be held June 11-13th on the campus of the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT— home of the Huskies, men’s …read more
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1:38 PM | Flexible Plastics Turn Vibrations Into Electrical Energy
Kui Yao and co-workers from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore have discovered a way to give lightweight polymer vibration harvesters a hundredfold boost in energy output—a finding that may help to eliminate manual battery recharging in microsensors and mobile devices. Read more »

Lei Zhang, ., Oh, S., Ting Chong Wong, ., Chin Yaw Tan, . & Kui Yao, . (2013). Piezoelectric polymer multilayer on flexible substrate for energy harvesting, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, 60 (9) 2013-2020. DOI:

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Editor's Pick

April 09, 2014

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8:11 PM | DNA-based logic gates operate inside cockroach cells
The logic units are driven by molecular collisions, not voltage.

April 08, 2014

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8:21 PM | Study Reveals Causes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Degradation
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) have made a surprising discovery about the degradation of dye-sensitized solar cells that could help pave the way to prolonging the lifetime of these cells. Read more »

Ono, L., Schulz, P., Endres, J., Nikiforov, G., Kato, Y., Kahn, A. & Qi, Y. (2014). Air-Exposure-Induced Gas-Molecule Incorporation into Spiro-MeOTAD Films, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 1374-1379. DOI:

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April 07, 2014

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6:53 PM | Researchers Use Sun to Make Solar Energy Materials
Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a way to tap the sun not only as a source of power, but also to directly produce the solar energy materials that make this possible. Read more »

Kim, K., Oleksak, R., Pan, C., Knapp, M., Kreider, P., Herman, G. & Chang, C. (2014). Continuous synthesis of colloidal chalcopyrite copper indium diselenide nanocrystal inks, RSC Advances, 4 (32) 16418. DOI:

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3:37 PM | Predicting Where Water Will Go In A Hurricane
Originally published: Apr 2 2014 - 4:00pm, Inside Science News ServiceBy: Joel N. Shurkin, ISNS Contributor(ISNS) -- In most hurricanes the greatest damage is done not by the wind but from the storm surge, the mountain of water pushed by raging winds from the ocean to deluge the land.There is always a level of unpredictability when dealing with Mother Nature, but knowing where the water would go when a storm is bearing down on the coast would be useful, particularly in densely populated coastal […]
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2:00 PM | One way Google’s cars localize themselves
Localization, or knowing “where am I” is a central topic of research in mobile robotics today, and it has been like that for more […] Read more The post One way Google’s cars localize themselves appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:A field experiment on social preferences using Google Answers Is D-Wave a Quantum Computer? To filter or not to filter, that’s the question...in 3D scene reconstruction
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3:45 AM | Kleene’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis
In 1936, Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. A myriad of other models followed, many of them taking seemingly unrelated approaches to the computable: algebraic, combinatorial, linguistic, logical, mechanistic, etc. Of course, […]

Dershowitz, N. & Gurevich, Y. (2008). A natural axiomatization of computability and proof of Church's Thesis, Bulletin of Symbolic Logic, 14 (3) 299-350. DOI:

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3:45 AM | Kleene’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis
In 1936, Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. A myriad of other models followed, many of them taking seemingly unrelated approaches to the computable: algebraic, combinatorial, linguistic, logical, mechanistic, etc. Of course, […]

Dershowitz, N. & Gurevich, Y. (2008). A natural axiomatization of computability and proof of Church's Thesis, Bulletin of Symbolic Logic, 14 (3) 299-350. DOI:

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April 06, 2014

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8:52 PM | Is the Internet Taking Away Religion in the US? This Study Seems to Say Yes
Allen Downey is a professor of computer science working at Olin College of Engineering in Massachusetts. Downey examined data from the General Social Survey (GSS) which shows that the percentage of people with no religious affiliation has increased to 18% in 2010, up from 8% in 1990. This equates to a difference of around 25 million people. […]
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6:17 PM | Homotopy Type Theory and Higher Inductive Types
In this second episode on homotopy type theory, we explore the possibilities allowed by higher inductive types. We use these to re-formalize integer numbers in a much more intuitive way, and we gaze at the homotopical structures that emerge out of such formalizations. We conclude by giving the new mind-blowing definitions of the (homotopical) circle and sphere.

April 03, 2014

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7:21 PM | Scientists Determine Most Favorable Wind Turbine Positioning
A team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) has developed a new way to study wake effects that takes into account the airflow both within and around a wind farm and challenges the conventional belief that turbines arrayed in checker board patterns produce the highest power output. Read more »

Stevens, R., Gayme, D. & Meneveau, C. (2014). Large eddy simulation studies of the effects of alignment and wind farm length, Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, 6 (2) 23105. DOI:

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1:00 PM | Computers used to teach other computers to play Pac-Man, StarCraft
Even incompatible algorithms can share advice, boost the learning curve.

April 02, 2014

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7:00 PM | New algorithm classifies everything from gene data to POTUS speeches
Accurately determines whether a State of the Union is pre- or post-Reagan.

March 31, 2014

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8:15 PM | Multilayered Waveguide Array Opens New Possibilities in Solar Power
A new study by researchers at the University at Buffalo explores the use of a nanoscale microchip component called a “multilayered waveguide taper array” that improves the chip’s ability to trap and absorb light. Read more »

Ji, D., Song, H., Zeng, X., Hu, H., Liu, K., Zhang, N. & Gan, Q. (2014). Broadband absorption engineering of hyperbolic metafilm patterns, Scientific Reports, 4 DOI:

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March 30, 2014

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10:14 AM | When gaming is NP-hard
by @ulaulaman about #candycrush #bejeweled #shariki #nphard #computerscience Shariki is a puzzle game developed by the russian programmer Eugene Alemzhin in 1994. The rules are simple: (...) matching three or more balls of the same color in line (vertical or horizontal). These balls then explode and a new ones appear in their place.The first Shariki's clone is Tetris Attack, a fusion between Shariki and the most famous Tetris, also this developed in Soviet Union by Alexey Pajitnov. But the […]

March 29, 2014

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1:34 PM | Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology
How advanced is computational power when it comes to simulating biological systems? This year, with the planned release of “transcendence” (an absolutely awesome looking film based on the technological singularity) and the […]

Janes KA, Reinhardt HC & Yaffe MB (2008). Cytokine-induced signaling networks prioritize dynamic range over signal strength., Cell, 135 (2) 343-54. PMID:

Yoon, B. (2009). Hidden Markov Models and their Applications in Biological Sequence Analysis, Current Genomics, 10 (6) 402-415. DOI:

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1:34 PM | Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology
How advanced is computational power when it comes to simulating biological systems? This year, with the planned release of “transcendence” (an absolutely awesome looking film based on the technological singularity) and the […]

Janes KA, Reinhardt HC & Yaffe MB (2008). Cytokine-induced signaling networks prioritize dynamic range over signal strength., Cell, 135 (2) 343-54. PMID:

Yoon, B. (2009). Hidden Markov Models and their Applications in Biological Sequence Analysis, Current Genomics, 10 (6) 402-415. DOI:

Citation
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1:34 PM | Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology
How advanced is computational power when it comes to simulating biological systems? This year, with the planned release of “transcendence” (an absolutely awesome looking film based on the technological singularity) and the […]

Janes KA, Reinhardt HC & Yaffe MB (2008). Cytokine-induced signaling networks prioritize dynamic range over signal strength., Cell, 135 (2) 343-54. PMID:

Yoon, B. (2009). Hidden Markov Models and their Applications in Biological Sequence Analysis, Current Genomics, 10 (6) 402-415. DOI:

Citation

March 27, 2014

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8:46 PM | New Magnetic Materials Hold Promise for Better Generators
Scientists from the Charles III University of Madrid (UC3M) are developing a new type of tidal energy generator that will be cheaper and more efficient. The device would replace conventional magnetic materials for new materials that are made using an alternative technology. Read more »

Torralba, J., Hidalgo, J. & Morales, A. (2013). Powder injection moulding: processing of small parts of complex shape, International Journal of Microstructure and Materials Properties, 8 (1/2) 87. DOI:

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March 26, 2014

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2:12 PM | Fragmented Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms Hold Promise for Better Batteries
The electrodes in lithium-ion batteries typically comprise three components: active materials, conductive additives, and binders. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Delaware has discovered that fragmented carbon nanotube macrofilms may eliminate the need for binders. Read more »

Cao, Z. & Wei, B. (2014). Fragmented Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms as Adhesive Conductors for Lithium-Ion Batteries, ACS Nano, 8 (3) 3049-3059. DOI:

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3:45 AM | Algorithmic Darwinism
The workshop on computational theories of evolution started off on Monday, March 17th with Leslie Valiant — one of the organizers — introducing his model of evolvability (Valiant, 2009). This original name was meant to capture what type of complexity can be achieved through evolution. Unfortunately — especially at this workshop — evolvability already had […]

Feldman, V. (2008). Evolvability from learning algorithms., Proceedings of the 40th annual ACM symposium on Theory of Computing, 619-628. DOI:

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3:45 AM | Algorithmic Darwinism
The workshop on computational theories of evolution started off on Monday, March 17th with Leslie Valiant — one of the organizers — introducing his model of evolvability (Valiant, 2009). This original name was meant to capture what type of complexity can be achieved through evolution. Unfortunately — especially at this workshop — evolvability already had […]

Feldman, V. (2008). Evolvability from learning algorithms., Proceedings of the 40th annual ACM symposium on Theory of Computing, 619-628. DOI:

Citation
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3:45 AM | Algorithmic Darwinism
The workshop on computational theories of evolution started off on Monday, March 17th with Leslie Valiant — one of the organizers — introducing his model of evolvability (Valiant, 2009). This original name was meant to capture what type of complexity can be achieved through evolution. Unfortunately — especially at this workshop — evolvability already had […]

Feldman, V. (2008). Evolvability from learning algorithms., Proceedings of the 40th annual ACM symposium on Theory of Computing, 619-628. DOI:

Citation
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1:28 AM | Who Owns the Future of Science Journalism? (A secret introduction to OpenSciLogs)
In his new book ‘Who Owns the Future,’ Jaron Lanier introduces the interesting idea that by expecting our news, our music, our online searches and online information in general to be free, we are undermining the very career prospects of those we look to for news, music and information. In fact, we are undermining our own ability to make careers as creatives; as writers, designers, journalists, artists, musicians. I can’t see this being any truer elsewhere than it is in... Read […]
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1:28 AM | Who Owns the Future of Science Journalism? (A secret introduction to OpenSciLogs)
In his new book ‘Who Owns the Future,’ Jaron Lanier introduces the interesting idea that by expecting our news, our music, our online searches and online information in general to be free, we are undermining the very career prospects of those we look to for news, music and information. In fact, we are undermining our own ability to make careers as creatives; as writers, designers, journalists, artists, musicians. I can’t see this being any truer elsewhere than it is in... Read […]
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1:28 AM | Who Owns the Future of Science Journalism? (A secret introduction to OpenSciLogs)
In his new book ‘Who Owns the Future,’ Jaron Lanier introduces the interesting idea that by expecting our news, our music, our online searches and online information in general to be free, we are undermining the very career prospects of those we look to for news, music and information. In fact, we are undermining our own ability to make careers as creatives; as writers, designers, journalists, artists, musicians. I can’t see this being any truer elsewhere than it is in... Read […]
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