Posts

October 18, 2014

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4:29 PM | Climate Change: It’s Only Human To Exaggerate, But Science Itself Does Not
Credit: EPABy Rob MacKenzie, University of BirminghamTo exaggerate is human, and scientists are human.Exaggeration and the complementary art of simplification are the basic rhetorical tools of human intercourse. So yes, scientists do exaggerate. So do politicians, perhaps even when, as the UK’s former environment secretary Owen Paterson did, they claim that climate change forecasts are “widely exaggerated”. read more

October 17, 2014

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12:55 PM | People Are More Swayed by Things That Look Sciencey
Anyone who’s paged through a women’s magazine will recognize this strategy: to make a product seem better, surround it with a scientific glow. “Clinical trials show lashes grow up to 400% fuller!” “27% reduction of dark spots in 10 weeks!” “Ceramides!” Does this actually help convince people to hand over their cash? A study using […]The post People Are More Swayed by Things That Look Sciencey appeared first on Inkfish.

Tal, A. & Wansink, B. (2014). Blinded with science: Trivial graphs and formulas increase ad persuasiveness and belief in product efficacy., Public Understanding of Science, DOI: 10.1177/0963662514549688

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October 16, 2014

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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

Citation
Editor's Pick
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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

Citation
Editor's Pick
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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

Citation
Editor's Pick
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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

Citation
Editor's Pick
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9:20 PM | The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria
Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. […]

Zhang Wang & Martin Wu (2014). Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite , PLoS ONE, Other:

Citation
Editor's Pick
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4:52 PM | Prehistoric crocodiles’ evolution mirrored in living species
Crocodiles which roamed the world’s seas millions of years ago developed in similar ways to their modern-day relatives, a study has shown. Fresh research into a group of prehistoric marine crocs known as Machimosaurus reveals key details of how and where they lived. Fresh research into a group of prehistoric marine crocs known as Machimosaurus … Continue reading →

October 14, 2014

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3:49 PM | New Morbid Terminology: Overburden
As funerary archaeologists, we need to consider the whole range of behavior surrounding death and burial. This includes the ritual surrounding preparation of the body for burial, modes of transportation […]

McGowan, G. & Prangnell, J. (2014). A method for calculating soil pressure overlying human burials, Journal of Archaeological Science, DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2014.09.016

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6:00 AM | Brian Cox's Human Universe presents a fatally flawed view of evolution
Humans do not stand at the top of a ladder of creation, above the apes and below the angels, superior to all other species When I watched the first episode of Human Universe, a televisual emission on the BBC presented by the ever-lovely Professor Brian Cox, I held my breath. I am usually allergic to tales of The Ascent of Man, but I thought and hoped that wed outgrown the idea of evolution as a linear narrative leading from archaea to astronauts. So I exhaled markedly about halfway through […]

October 13, 2014

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9:17 PM | Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest?
“Emodiversity” – a life containing a balance of different emotions – is good for you. So say psychologists Jordi Quoidbach and colleagues in a rather cool new paper (pdf). In two large surveys (with a total of over 37,000 responders), conducted in France and Belgium, Quoidbach et al. show that emodiversity is an independent predictor […]The post Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Quoidbach J, Gruber J, Mikolajczak M, Kogan A, Kotsou I & Norton MI (2014). Emodiversity and the Emotional Ecosystem., Journal of experimental psychology. General, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25285428

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October 11, 2014

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8:49 PM | The interdisciplinary continuum in studies of Humanity and the Earth
Sometimes I find it hard to put myself into a subject area box. I was a Geography undergraduate, a Geoarchaeology MSc student, and did a PhD jointly in Chemistry and Archaeology. What does that make me? I used to say I was a geoarchaeologist, applying the methods of geoscience to archaeological questions. But I realised that was too narrow, as even the methods I draw upon vary depending on the question being asked, and indeed a multi-proxy approach is something which I try  to promote. My […]

October 10, 2014

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12:00 PM | New Book: A History of Life in 100 Fossils
Left-handed snails, giant wombats, spiny trilobites, zombie ants, glyptodonts…these are a few of the fascinating animals and plants whose fossils spring to life across the […] The post New Book: A History of Life in 100 Fossils appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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11:33 AM | The discovery of new bones from a large land mammal that lived about 48 million years ago has led scientists to identify a new branch of mammals closely related to modern horses, rhinos, and tapirs.
The discovery of new bones from a large land mammal that lived about 48 million years ago has led scientists to identify a new branch of mammals closely related to modern horses, rhinos, and tapirs. This family of large mammals, Anthracobunidae, is only known from India and Pakistan and was commonly considered to be ancestors … Continue reading →
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11:27 AM | Treasure trove of ancient genomes helps recalibrate the human evolutionary clock
Scientists have long used DNA data to develop molecular clocks that measure the rate at which DNA changes, i.e., accumulates mutations, as a premiere tool to peer into the past evolutionary timelines for the lineage of a given species. In human evolution, for example, molecular clocks, when combined with fossil evidence, have helped trace the … Continue reading →
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1:00 AM | Societies Where Women Outnumber Men Are Just As Violent
There's long been a common-sense idea — largely untested by science — that having a surplus of men in a society causes more violence. But now we have evidence that this isn't true. Societies where the population is dominated by women are just as violent as ones dominated by men.Read more...

October 09, 2014

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1:48 PM | Live Symposium: The Anthropocene
The world is changing at a rapid pace. Scientists have documented significant changes during the past century in climate, land-use and biodiversity that are unprecedented […] The post Live Symposium: The Anthropocene appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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1:00 AM | Masculinity And Terror: The Missing Conversation
Violent rhetoric appeals to disaffected young men because it gives them a challenge to express aggression as 'proof' of manhood. Credit: Sillouetted children playing as soldiers/ShutterstockBy David Plummer, Griffith UniversityRecent coverage of counter-terrorism raids in Australia featured hard-core gyms, anabolic steroids, nightclub bouncers, gangs and weapons. Footage from the Middle East regularly depicts truckloads of young bearded warriors bristling with ordnance. read more

October 08, 2014

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9:14 PM | Status Matters - Even In The Amazon
"Keeping up with the Joneses" is a colloquialism for developing world desire to have the same or better status in society than peers. If someone gets a new car, you get a new car. In some people, status is so important they suffer psychological distress if they lack status. But it isn't just for the middle class in Western nations, say anthropologists at U.C. Santa Barbara, who found that the same need exists among the Tsimane, an egalitarian society of forager-farmers in the Bolivian […]
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8:30 PM | Haunting Cave Paintings in Indonesia Are the Oldest in the World
This stencil of a graceful, outstretched hand was discovered in a cave on an Indonesian island. And now we know that it's more than 39,900 years old. That makes it the oldest painting in the world, at least so far, and shows that humans in Asia developed symbolic expression at the same time as humans in Europe.Read more...

October 07, 2014

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8:16 PM | Top 10 reasons to learn to make Stone Age tools
The Late Acheulean hand axe, going back about 500,000 years, "is the oldest technology that pretty much everyone agrees is unique to humans," says experimental archeologist Dietrich Stout. By Carol ClarkAre you between the ages of 18 to 50, right-handed, and available for six hours per week? Emory experimental archeologists are looking for at least 20 healthy individuals willing to devote 100 hours over about four months to learn the art of making a Stone Age hand axe.“We need novices who […]
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7:02 PM | Transport, Trade And Travel
was the title of a history book I had as a boy.  Good things, in their way — without them, I wouldn’t be able to sit here talking to you all and meeting some very interesting people online.  But some decidedly unpleasant customers do all too often hitch a ride. read more

October 06, 2014

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8:18 PM | Breaking Bio Episode 68 – #SAFE13 with Drs. Clancy, Nelson, Rutherford & Hinde
This week, we sit down and discuss the #SAFE13 project, which is bringing incidences of sexual harassment and assault in scientific field research to light, with the study’s authors: Dr. Kate Clancy, Dr. Robin Nelson, Dr. Julienne Rutherford, and Dr. Katie Hinde. The #SAFE13 paper is open access and can be read for free –(...)

October 05, 2014

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5:18 AM | Book Review: Listen, Here is a Story: Ethnographic Life Narratives from Aka and Ngandu Women of the Congo Basin
When you look in the news for the Central African Republic you encounter stories about rebels, terror, civil war, murder, and bloodshed. But what are the other aspects of life in the region that no news agency covers? A journey to the center of the African rainforest reveals what happens and has been happening for […]

October 03, 2014

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2:02 PM | Children Need To Play Outdoors, But We're Not Letting Them
Evidence shows children are getting less unsupervised time outdoors. Credit: Brian Yap (葉)/Flickr, CC BY-NCBy Shelby Gull Laird and Laura McFarland-Piazza read more

October 02, 2014

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9:04 PM | The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered
There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it […]

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin, & David Posada (2014). The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations, Science, Other:

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9:04 PM | The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered
There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it […]

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin, & David Posada (2014). The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations, Science, Other:

Citation
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9:04 PM | The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered
There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it […]

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin, & David Posada (2014). The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations, Science, Other:

Citation
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9:04 PM | The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered
There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it […]

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin, & David Posada (2014). The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations, Science, Other:

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