Posts

January 27, 2015

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8:48 PM | Itchy Skin, Diarrhea Evolved to Promote Good Health
Flatulence, diarrhea, rashes and other health issues have been with some humans and their ancestors for up to a million or more years.
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7:38 PM | New Tattoos Found on Oetzi the Iceman
A new imaging technique allowed researchers to identify 61 tattoos on the 5,300-year-old mummified body of Ötzi the Iceman.
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7:38 PM | New Tattoos Found on Oetzi the Iceman
A new imaging technique allowed researchers to identify 61 tattoos on the 5,300-year-old mummified body of Ötzi the Iceman.
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4:00 PM | Big-Toothed Fossil May Be Primitive New Human
The human history plot thickens with the discovery of a new archaic human from Taiwan that might have coexisted and interbred with our species.
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3:48 PM | Reuse of Cemeteries in Prehistoric Ireland
With the cold weather and ice descending upon the Midwest, I’ve found myself spending more time watching HGTV than I normally do. My favorite shows are the fixer upper ones, […]

Quinn, C. (2015). Returning and reuse: Diachronic perspectives on multi-component cemeteries and mortuary politics at Middle Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Tara, Ireland, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 37 1-18. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaa.2014.10.003

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January 25, 2015

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2:13 PM | Whose Culture is it Anyway? Disentangling Culture and Eating Disorders – Part 3
The articles I’ve looked at so far in this series (Becker, in part 1, and Keel and Klump in part 2) give us some insight into the idea that the link between “Western” societies and eating disorders is more complex than a simple matter of media exposure. But, having read these studies, I was still left a bit wanting in terms of unpacking that black box of “culture” that gets tossed around in scholarly and popular literature. What, exactly, are we talking about when […]

January 24, 2015

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2:39 PM | Urban Legends In The World of Clinical Trials
Ethnographer Jill A. Fisher offers a fascinating look at the rumors and urban legends that circulate among the volunteers who get paid to take part in medical research: Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA Fisher visited six clinical trial facilities across the USA. All of these facilities were exclusively devoted to running phase I trials, testing new drugs to see if they are safe in humans. She spent a total of 450 hours in the field, getting to know the 'guinea pigs', and the staf

Fisher JA (2015). Stopped hearts, amputated toes and NASA: contemporary legends among healthy volunteers in US phase I clinical trials., Sociology of health & illness, 37 (1) 127-42. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601069

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January 23, 2015

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5:00 PM | Good Health Is Part Of Native Culture - So Is Bad
Diabetes has been described as an epidemic of modern times so why does it affect aboriginal people more? Over the past several decades diabetes has become a prevalent health concern among Canada's First Nations communities, but it wasn't always so.read more
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2:01 PM | Australopithecus africanus, Other Early Hominins May Have Made, Used Stone Tools
A team of scientists led by Dr Tracy Kivell of the University of Kent and University College London has found strong evidence for stone tool use among Australopithecus africanus (3 to 2 million years ago) and several Pleistocene hominins, traditionally considered not to have engaged in habitual tool manufacture. The distinctly human ability for forceful [...]

January 22, 2015

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10:54 PM | xiphoidprocess: anthrocentric: Infectious disease, behavioural...
xiphoidprocess: anthrocentric: Infectious disease, behavioural flexibility and the evolution of culture in primates Abstract: Culturally transmitted traits are observed in a wide array of animal species, yet we understand little about the costs of the behavioural patterns that underlie culture, such as innovation and social learning. We propose that infectious diseases are a significant cost associated with cultural transmission. We investigated two hypotheses that may explain such a […]
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10:34 PM | 3 Million Years Ago, Pre-Humans May Have Used Hands Just Like Modern Humans
Social scientists believe that pre-Homo human ancestral species, such as Australopithecus africanus, used human-like hand postures much earlier than was previously thought.The authors say they have the first archaeological evidence for stone tool use among fossil australopiths 3-2 million years ago. The distinctly human ability for forceful precision (e.g. when turning a key) and power "squeeze" gripping (e.g. when using a hammer) is linked to two key evolutionary transitions in hand use: a […]
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10:21 PM | wefuckinglovescience: DNA results suggest Kennewick man was...
wefuckinglovescience: DNA results suggest Kennewick man was Native American. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1yRAnFU
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10:13 PM | There's so many old white men in my Evolution textbook, but I thought I saw a post here some time ago about women involved in early research on that topic. Help?
Oh absolutely!  The first who comes to mind is Mary Leakey, who helped discover many a premodern hominid, including Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis).  I’ll go back and see if I can find the post you’re referencing and reblog it.  If I can’t, I’ll write one up for you. :)

January 20, 2015

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4:43 PM | Canine Cooperation Hypothesis: Thank The Social Skills Of Wolves For Dog-Human Cooperation
Most dogs and most humans get along well now and anthropological explanations are that selective selection is the reason; wolves that were not a threat were not killed and over time the agreeable ones got shelter and food. That cooperation has led to thousands of years of being man's best friend.Friederike Range and Zsófia Virányi from the Unit of Comparative Cognition at the Messerli Research Institute at University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have an alternate idea, the […]
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4:25 PM | Ideological Claims Debunked: Poor Parents Are Not Less Involved With Kids Than Rich Ones
Some cultural pundits contend that income inequality is linked to parenting inequality but new findings dispute that. You don't have to be wealthy to be involved in your child's life, despite modern thinking, according to a new paper which finds that poorer parents are just as involved in education, leisure and sports activities with their children as wealthier ones.The researchers used the Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK survey, carried out between March and December 2012. Among […]
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2:00 PM | Mostly Dead, but Slightly Alive: The Life After Death of Dismembered Remains in Ancient Peru
In the Princess Bride, the deceased body of Westley is brought to Miracle Max in order to bring him back to life. Famously, May says ‘There’s a big difference between mostly dead […]

Tung, T. (2014). Agency, ‘Til Death Do Us Part? Inquiring about the Agency of Dead Bodies from the Ancient Andes, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 24 (03) 437-452. DOI: 10.1017/S0959774314000614

Arnold, B. (2014). Life After Life: Bioarchaeology and Post-mortem Agency, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 24 (03) 523-529. DOI: 10.1017/S0959774314000572

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Editor's Pick
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2:00 PM | Mostly Dead, but Slightly Alive: The Life After Death of Dismembered Remains in Ancient Peru
In the Princess Bride, the deceased body of Westley is brought to Miracle Max in order to bring him back to life. Famously, May says ‘There’s a big difference between mostly dead […]

Tung, T. (2014). Agency, ‘Til Death Do Us Part? Inquiring about the Agency of Dead Bodies from the Ancient Andes, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 24 (03) 437-452. DOI: 10.1017/S0959774314000614

Arnold, B. (2014). Life After Life: Bioarchaeology and Post-mortem Agency, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 24 (03) 523-529. DOI: 10.1017/S0959774314000572

Citation
Editor's Pick

January 16, 2015

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5:58 PM | World’s oldest butchering tools gave evolutionary edge to human communication
Two and a half million years ago, our hominin ancestors in the African savanna crafted rocks into shards that could slice apart a dead gazelle, zebra or other game animal. Over the next 700,000 years, this butchering technology spread throughout the continent and, it turns out, came to be a major evolutionary force. Combining the … Continue reading →
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2:25 PM | Anthropocene: New Geological Epoch Began on July 16, 1945
Climate change, the loss of biosphere integrity, land-system change, and altered biogeochemical cycles like phosphorus and nitrogen runoff have all passed beyond levels that put humanity in a safe operating space, in turn driving our planet into a new geological epoch – Anthropocene, according to two papers published by Prof Will Steffen of the Australian [...]

January 15, 2015

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5:35 PM | Trepanation! Not Just For Headaches: Tibial Surgery in Ancient Peru
Trepanation! Not Just For Headaches: Tibial Surgery in Ancient Peru: A new study by Toyne (2015) examines possible evidence for the use of the trepanation technique applied to lower leg bones. The sample was found in the Chachapoyas region of Peru, at the Kuelap site, which dates from 800–1535 CE. The city was a powerful political and social center in this region, and was occupied by a large population. As Europeans began exploring this area of South America, they wrote about […]
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4:40 PM | I'm an Ethical Collector of Human Bones and Other Weird Stuff
I'm an Ethical Collector of Human Bones and Other Weird Stuff: dead-men-talking: This is an oxymoron.  Unless you are a professional or participating in a cultural activity with explicit consent, you should not be involved in the buying, selling, or trading of human remains.  Even “antique” medical specimens have unethical origins.  Spend your money on a high-quality Bone Clone instead.  They’ll seem real to most people anyway. This article was posted on a […]
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2:02 PM | Trepanation! Not Just For Headaches: Tibial Surgery in Ancient Peru
Over the past two years, I’ve been commuting from my home to my university. It’s about an hour drive each way (unless it’s snowing, and then it could be two […]

Toyne, J. (2015). Tibial surgery in ancient Peru, International Journal of Paleopathology, 8 29-35. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpp.2014.09.002

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3:32 AM | Yak dung burning pollutes indoor air of Tibetan households
A child sits before the family stove, fueled by yak dung, in a traditional tent in Tibet. (Photo by Qingyang Xiao.)By Carol ClarkTibet, the highest region on Earth and one of the most remote, is associated with vivid blue skies and the crystal clear air of the Himalayas. During the long cold season, however, the traditional nomadic people spend much of their time in snug dwellings where they cook and stay warm by burning yak dung. Their indoor air can be filled with dangerous levels of fine […]

January 14, 2015

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7:00 PM | Conform To The Norm And Video Games Might End Racism
Conformity is a bad thing, in media portrayals like Apple advertisements - yet then they have a lot of people who look a lot alike all standing in line to buy the latest iPhone.In reality, despite the claims of creative people who insist that only one brand is for creative people, they are conforming. It is human nature to conform. Former Vice-President Dan Quayle was once criticized for not knowing how to spell 'potato' while guest judging a spelling event. It was spelled wrong on the answer […]

January 13, 2015

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7:36 PM | Museum specimens come to life in new “Skin and Bones” mobile app
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History released a new mobile app “Skin and Bones” Jan. 13. The free app is available for download in […] The post Museum specimens come to life in new “Skin and Bones” mobile app appeared first on Smithsonian Science.
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12:00 PM | Not All Are Buried Here: Selective Burial in Prehistoric Spain
Interpreting cemeteries in order to understand the living population is a dangerous and difficult task. On the one hand, cemeteries are really our only form of information about the actual […]

Fernández-Crespo, T. & de-la-Rúa, C. (2015). Demographic evidence of selective burial in megalithic graves of northern Spain, Journal of Archaeological Science, 53 604-617. DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2014.11.015

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January 12, 2015

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2:02 AM | The MEGA Anthropology Tumblr List!
anthropologydaily: Please add your own anthropology based blog to the list :) Anthropology Adventures Anthropology Stories Anthropology, My Dear Watson Archaeoart Archaeological News Colorado State University Anthropology Department Fuck Yeah Anthropology! Fuck Yeah Forensic Anthropology Gwebarchaeology L’Enfant Sauvage Musings of an Anthropology Student Society for the Anthropology of Europe The Anthropology Chronicles  The Archaeological Society of South Carolina The Bearded […]
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1:44 AM | Margaret Mead was bisexual
etaunknown: "Sorry, what was that? I can’t hear you over the sound of Margaret Mead being bisexual" That’s right motherfuckers, bi-fucking-sexual. We win. #though techically she did not identify as such#(bisexuality was not yet recognized as an identity and considered more of a behavior)#(so perhaps she would call herself bisexual if she were living today)#(but that is speculation and I am uncomfortable assigning people with identities they did not give themselves)#ANYWAY […]

January 11, 2015

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2:02 PM | Divorce Monday: January Divorce Rush Dates Back To The Middle Ages
Odds are they won't be so happy after Yuletide. ShutterstockBy Frederik Pedersen, University of AberdeenJanuary is a strain for most people. It’s dark and the festive lights don’t disguise this anymore. You’re back at work and the next holiday may be some way off. You’ve just had to spend a large amount of time with your family. This has consequences. read more

January 10, 2015

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8:06 PM | going barefoot
claimtoken-54b2a4e90fff9 New year, new site, new name, new entry. [bloga.epidemiologica] has served me well, but it’s time to change things up and go barefoot. The term “gumshoe epidemiology” is nearly always preceded by the adjective “classic.” The term refers to the basic epidemiological fieldwork: house-to-house, person-to-person, eatery-to-eatery detective work involved in tracking down the source…
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