Posts

December 26, 2014

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11:20 PM | The Obligation of Gifts
For those of you with Christmas trees, they probably look a little barren following the unwrapping of presents. What did you get for Christmas? And what did you give in return? Gift giving is a large... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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11:20 PM | The Obligation of Gifts
For those of you with Christmas trees, they probably look a little barren following the unwrapping of presents. What did you get for Christmas? And what did you give in return? Gift giving is a large... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

December 24, 2014

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4:21 PM | Shift from Foraging to Farming Led to Fragile, Lightweight Human Skeletons
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that modern human skeletons have become much lighter and more fragile since the invention of agriculture. “We set out to test three potential explanations for modern human gracility and any one of them would have been interesting. What we found was [...]

December 22, 2014

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10:00 AM | Searching for Deaf People
In the bluish early morning light, we gathered by the gate of Deaf Development Programme (DDP) with our provisions of fully-charged smartphones, water, face masks, cameras and scarves for what promised to be a long day. The four of us, a teacher, an interpreter, a deaf interpreter and a tag-along anthropologist, climbed into a tuk-tuk and set off, navigating the morning traffic on our way to find deaf people in the villages.

December 19, 2014

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3:00 PM | Science for the People: Amazons
This week, Science for the People is learning how science can shed light on the stories told by our ancestors. They’re joined by folklorist and science historian Adrienne Mayor, author of The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the … Continue reading →

December 18, 2014

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1:51 PM | Happy Holidays: Gifts for the Deceased in Anglo-Saxon England
The holiday season is upon us, and that means that many of us are thinking about gifts. As I’ve been wrapping the presents I’ve bought for my family, I’ve been […]

King, J. (2004). Grave-Goods as Gifts in Early Saxon Burials (ca. AD 450-600), Journal of Social Archaeology, 4 (2) 214-238. DOI: 10.1177/1469605304041076

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December 17, 2014

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6:19 PM | Early Inhabitants of Easter Island Thrived on Sweet Potato Diet
Ancient Easter Islanders had a diet of mostly sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) before European contact, according to researchers Dr John Dudgeon from Idaho State University and Monica Tromp from the University of Otago, New Zealand. The team has just published a new paper clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been [...]
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4:42 PM | Time To Stop Thinking Of Video Games As Just 'Software'
Games appear in galleries, does that make them art? blakespot, CC BYBy Ashok Ranchhod, University of Southampton and Vanissa Wanick Vieira, University of Southampton. read more

December 16, 2014

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8:40 PM | This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display
The extraordinary mummified remains of a 50-year-old woman discovered in a fetal position is set to go on display at a museum in France.Read more...
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4:18 PM | “Een eiland in een zee van ongeloof”: het activistische verzet van moslims in Nederland, België en Duitsland
In het rapport Eilanden in een zee van ongeloof – Het verzet van de activistische daʿwa in België, Nederland en Duitsland, laten de onderzoekers zien hoe netwerken zich verzetten tegen wat zij zien als de onderdrukking, onderwerping en vernedering door de ongelovigen.
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2:44 PM | Christmas Dinner In Medieval Times Wasn't What You Think
Want something a little different for Christmas this year? Caroline Yeldham, courtesy of the Leeds International Medieval CongressBy Iona McCleery, University of Leeds.With Christmas almost upon us, there will be plenty of frenzied present shopping and meal planning. Haven’t made that Christmas cake yet? Fear not. If you were preparing the festive meal 600 years ago you’d have far more on your plate. read more
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2:27 PM | There Was No 'Paleo Diet' - Ancient People Ate What They Had
The Paleolithic diet, eating like our ancient ancestors, is a diet fad that seeks to emulate the diet of early humans during the Stone Age. But what does that mean? Almost anything people want because ancestral diets differed substantially over time and geography, notes a paper in The Quarterly Review of Biology. The review examines anatomical, paleoenvironmental and chemical evidence, as well as the feeding behavior of living animals. While early hominids were not great hunters, and their […]
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12:50 AM | Top 4 of 2014: Your Favourite Canine Science Posts
As December rolls into its second half, and the days warm up - or cool down - depending on where you are situated on the globe, we wanted to say thank you for joining us in 2014 - we are continually blown away with the popular and supportive community we have around us at Do You Believe in Dog? here on the blog, on Facebook and also on Twitter. Taking our lead from Companion Animal Psychology, we decided to jump into some statistics (because hey, we are scientists!) to see […]

Scanlon E. (2013). Scholarship in the digital age: Open educational resources, publication and public engagement, British Journal of Educational Technology, 45 (1) 12-23. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12010

Stilgoe J. & J. Wilsdon (2014). Why should we promote public engagement with science?, Public Understanding of Science, 23 (1) 4-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662513518154

Wong-Parodi G. & Strauss B.H. (2014). Team science for science communication., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25225381

Citation
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12:50 AM | Top 4 of 2014: Your Favourite Canine Science Posts
As December rolls into its second half, and the days warm up - or cool down - depending on where you are situated on the globe, we wanted to say thank you for joining us in 2014 - we are continually blown away with the popular and supportive community we have around us at Do You Believe in Dog? here on the blog, on Facebook and also on Twitter. Taking our lead from Companion Animal Psychology, we decided to jump into some statistics (because hey, we are scientists!) to see […]

Scanlon E. (2013). Scholarship in the digital age: Open educational resources, publication and public engagement, British Journal of Educational Technology, 45 (1) 12-23. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12010

Stilgoe J. & J. Wilsdon (2014). Why should we promote public engagement with science?, Public Understanding of Science, 23 (1) 4-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662513518154

Wong-Parodi G. & Strauss B.H. (2014). Team science for science communication., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25225381

Citation
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12:50 AM | Top 4 of 2014: Your Favourite Canine Science Posts
As December rolls into its second half, and the days warm up - or cool down - depending on where you are situated on the globe, we wanted to say thank you for joining us in 2014 - we are continually blown away with the popular and supportive community we have around us at Do You Believe in Dog? here on the blog, on Facebook and also on Twitter. Taking our lead from Companion Animal Psychology, we decided to jump into some statistics (because hey, we are scientists!) to see […]

Scanlon E. (2013). Scholarship in the digital age: Open educational resources, publication and public engagement, British Journal of Educational Technology, 45 (1) 12-23. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12010

Stilgoe J. & J. Wilsdon (2014). Why should we promote public engagement with science?, Public Understanding of Science, 23 (1) 4-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662513518154

Wong-Parodi G. & Strauss B.H. (2014). Team science for science communication., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25225381

Citation

December 15, 2014

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5:20 PM | For The First Time In 3,200 Years, This Colossal Statue Stands Again 
Archaeologists working in the Egyptian city of Luxor have completed their restoration of a statue of ancient Pharaoh Amenhotep III. Along with its twin effigy, they're considered the highest statues of a pharaoh in a walking position. Read more...

December 12, 2014

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2:55 PM | How Networks Are Revolutionizing Scientific (and Maybe Human) Thought
Science and common sense are alike grounded in human experience. Yet these ways of thinking about things are often in conflict. Sometimes the simplicity of most commonsense explanations can make it... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:27 PM | A genetic atlas of human history
Two papers caught my eye recently that have taken advantage of the proliferation of whole genome sequencing techniques in recent years. With prices of sequencing whole genomes coming down and down, biologists are having access to vast amounts of data. The 1000 Genomes Project was one of the first to collect the vast amounts of […]
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4:15 AM | The Male Idiot Theory
Image credits: bilbypdalgyte.deviantart.com Yes, that’s a thing. According to hospital emergency departments and mortality stats, men are far likelier than women to experience accidental and sporting injuries, as well as...

Ben Alexander, Daniel Lendrem, Dennis William Lendrem, Andy Gray & John Dudley Isaacs (2014). The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour, BMJ, 349. Other:

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December 11, 2014

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7:32 PM | The Headless Romans: Headhunting, Defeated Gladiators or Natural River Movement?
In the Walbrook Valley near the city of London, large numbers of human remains, dating to the Roman occupation of England, have been recovered over the past 175 years- and […]

Redfern, R. & Bonney, H. (2014). Headhunting and amphitheatre combat in Roman London, England: new evidence from the Walbrook Valley, Journal of Archaeological Science, 43 214-226. DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2013.12.013

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December 10, 2014

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7:16 PM | Ancient doodle hints that Homo erectus was smarter than we thought
Etchings found on a shell discovered in Java but overlooked for decades.
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1:23 PM | Smithsonian X 3D – Exhibits
How 3D technology is used at the Smithsonian to create world class exhibits! The post Smithsonian X 3D – Exhibits appeared first on Smithsonian Science.

December 08, 2014

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11:47 PM | Don't miss out! Dogs + Science from November
Catch up! Participate! Plan your conferences for 2015! Check out all the latest in canine science from November here, thanks to the magic of Storify (if you don't see a beautiful array of handy snippets below, please click this link to view)[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-30 November 2014]" on Storify]Further reading: Cobb M., Paul McGreevy, Alan Lill & Pauleen Bennett (2014). The advent of canine performance science: Offering a sustainable future for working […]

Bradshaw J.W.S. & Rachel A. Casey (2009). Dominance in domestic dogs—useful construct or bad habit?, Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 4 (3) 135-144. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2008.08.004

Gosling S.D. & Oliver P. John (2003). A Dog's Got Personality: A Cross-Species Comparative Approach to Personality Judgments in Dogs and Humans., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85 (6) 1161-1169. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.85.6.1161

Citation
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11:47 PM | Don't miss out! Dogs + Science from November
Catch up! Participate! Plan your conferences for 2015! Check out all the latest in canine science from November here, thanks to the magic of Storify (if you don't see a beautiful array of handy snippets below, please click this link to view)[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-30 November 2014]" on Storify]Further reading: Cobb M., Paul McGreevy, Alan Lill & Pauleen Bennett (2014). The advent of canine performance science: Offering a sustainable future for working […]

Bradshaw J.W.S. & Rachel A. Casey (2009). Dominance in domestic dogs—useful construct or bad habit?, Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 4 (3) 135-144. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2008.08.004

Gosling S.D. & Oliver P. John (2003). A Dog's Got Personality: A Cross-Species Comparative Approach to Personality Judgments in Dogs and Humans., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85 (6) 1161-1169. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.85.6.1161

Citation
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10:38 PM | December 7, 2014: Return “Kidnapped” Animals to the Wild, Save the World’s Big Cats and More
This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb El Capitan with young children, stop the kidnapping of Brazil's wildlife, save lions by saving livestock, lift a 35-ton stone with prehistoric technology, work to save the last 3,000 wild tigers, visit some of the last nomadic tribes, bottle feed a baby cheetah, and clean up hazardous waste.
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3:00 AM | Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
By Yuval Noah Harari Synopsis: 100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our […]

December 05, 2014

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5:49 PM | An Ancient Time Rich in Culture In the dawn of early humans,...
An Ancient Time Rich in Culture In the dawn of early humans, there were long periods of slow change. Then, the archaeological record shows a sudden bloom of culture, improved tools, and art forms such as decorative beads, red ochre coloring, and cave paintings. What triggered this flourishing of culture that separated us from the rest of our ancient ancestors forever? By: World Science Festival.
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1:11 AM | What’s in a Gene? Interpreting Genetic Variation in...
What’s in a Gene? Interpreting Genetic Variation in Ancient Humans What is the value of genetic variation? How do geneticists find them? Alison Brooks, Chris Stringer, and Ed Green discuss the merits of variation within a species, and the difficulty in deciphering genes for their adaptive benefit. By: World Science Festival.
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12:22 AM | Did We Have a Genetic Advantage? Why did modern humans outlast...
Did We Have a Genetic Advantage? Why did modern humans outlast other groups? Was it in their genes? Was it chance? Alison Brooks, an anthropologist at George Washington University, takes a look at the differences between Neanderthal and modern human physiology in order to see what sort of edge we may have had, if any. By: World Science Festival.

December 04, 2014

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11:32 PM | Got Milk? Early Humans and Lactase Persistence Genome biologist...
Got Milk? Early Humans and Lactase Persistence Genome biologist Ed Green describes the process in which the genes of two groups can be compared to look for selected benefits. He cites a gene that gave humans a unique advantage over the rest of the animal kingdom: our ability to digest milk as adults. By: World Science Festival.
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