Posts

July 15, 2014

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4:18 PM | Here’s What Happens When You Put Camera Traps in Trees
The world holds very few unexplored places between zero and six feet off the ground. If humans can walk right up to it and take a picture, we probably already have. But the tops of the trees, like the bottom of the ocean, are a different story. “We know so much less about arboreal mammal […]The post Here’s What Happens When You Put Camera Traps in Trees appeared first on Inkfish.

Gregory, T., Carrasco Rueda, F., Deichmann, J., Kolowski, J. & Alonso, A. (2014). Arboreal camera trapping: taking a proven method to new heights, Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5 (5) 443-451. DOI: 10.1111/2041-210X.12177

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12:53 PM | Using the Dead to Understand Access to Water
As humans, we cannot survive without water. In the first world, we are privileged to have consistent access to fresh clean water. In many countries, access to water is based […]

Lightfoot, E., Šlaus, M. & O'Connell, T. (2014). Water consumption in Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval Croatia, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 154 (4) 535-543. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22544

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7:45 AM | It's possible to "forget" unwanted habits
New research shows that we can weaken and even undo practised habits by deliberately deciding to forget them.Gesine Dreisbach and Karl-Heinz Bäuml from Regensburg University first instilled new habits in their participants by presenting them with German words and training them over many trials to make the same response to each word - a left-handed key-press for half of them, a right-hand response for the remainder.Later, participants had to categorise the same words by gender, with […]

Dreisbach, G. & Bauml, K. (2014). Don't Do It Again! Directed Forgetting of Habits, Psychological Science, 25 (6) 1242-1248. DOI: 10.1177/0956797614526063

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7:20 AM | Wisconsin researchers report new genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood
Igor SlukvinA group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reported yesterday the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.The research is important because it identifies how nature itself makes blood products at the earliest stages of development. The discovery gives scientists the tools to make the cells themselves, investigate how blood […]

Irina Elcheva, Vera Brok-Volchanskaya, Akhilesh Kumar, Patricia Liu, Jeong-Hee Lee, et al. (2014). Direct induction of haematoendothelial programs in human pluripotent stem cells by transcriptional regulators., Nature Communications, Other:

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July 14, 2014

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6:48 PM | Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity?
An entertaining paper just out in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience offers a panoramic view of the whole of neuroscience: Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity The paper is remarkable not just for its content but also for its style. Some examples: How does the brain work? This nagging question is an habitué from the top […]The post Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Tognoli E & Kelso JA (2014). Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity., Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 8 122. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25009476

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6:27 PM | History of neuroscience: Hodgkin and Huxley
Hodgkin and Huxley used the large axons of the giant squid to measure voltage changes during an action potential. By the late 1930s, researchers had come to understand several important things about the conduction of signals within neurons. For example, they knew that signaling within neurons is electrical in nature (as opposed to signaling between neurons, which is usually chemical), and that it occurs in bursts of activity called action potentials. And they knew that action […]

Schwiening, C. (2012). A brief historical perspective: Hodgkin and Huxley, The Journal of Physiology, 590 (11) 2571-2575. DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2012.230458

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5:13 PM | Schizophrenic Noise and Schizophrenic Voices
Hear that voice? What is there more than one? Is this real, or fake? How do you know? That is how schizophrenia works: auditory hallucinations, confusion, inability to tell what […]

Teal S. Eich,, Derek Evan Nee,, Catherine Insel,, Chara Malapani, & Edward E. Smith (2014). Neural Correlates of Impaired Cognitive Control over Working Memory in Schizophrenia, Biological psychiatry, 76 (2) Other:

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9:02 AM | Joint hypermobility, gait and autism
I have already made mention of the paper by Maya Shetreat-Klein and colleagues [1] on this blog as part of a post on the potential usefulness of kata training for at least some people on the autism spectrum (see here). Based on an analysis of 38 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a similar number of asymptomatic controls (all medication free), researchers set about recording "the characteristics of gait and prevalence of toe walking, the range of passive joint mobility, […]

Shetreat-Klein M, Shinnar S & Rapin I (2014). Abnormalities of joint mobility and gait in children with autism spectrum disorders., Brain & development, 36 (2) 91-6. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22401670

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8:29 AM | Young men and women have very different attitudes towards touch in cross-sex friendships
Friendships between heterosexual men and women can be tricky to navigate, especially when it comes to tactile contact. Is that touch on the arm a gesture of platonic care and affection? Or an unwanted signal of sexual interest? A new survey by US researchers shows the situation is complicated by the contrasting attitudes of young men and women towards touch in cross-sex friendships.Michael Miller and his team quizzed 276 undergrads at an Eastern US University, including 128 women*. The […]

MILLER, M., DENES, A., DIAZ, B. & RANJIT, Y. (2014). Touch attitudes in cross-sex friendships: We're just friends, Personal Relationships, 21 (2) 309-323. DOI: 10.1111/pere.12033

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12:51 AM | Photosynthesis in action: new technique resolves atomic changes in undamaged photosystems
All life on Earth begins and ends with photosynthesis, the super-efficient method adopted by plants to convert light energy into its more useful sugar form, with oxygen as the serendipitous byproduct (for us, anyway).  But for so ubiquitous a phenomenon, we … Continue reading →

Kupitz, C., Basu, S., Grotjohann, I., Fromme, R., Zatsepin, N., Rendek, K., Hunter, M., Shoeman, R., White, T., Wang, D. & James, D. (2014). Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond X-ray laser, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature13453

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July 13, 2014

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7:15 PM | New ways to test for Alzheimers
Accurately diagnosing alzheimer’s is not an easy thing to do. In fact most of the time people aren’t diagnosed until very late in the progression of the disease, long after […]

Matthew E Growdon,, Aaron Schultz,, Alexander Dagley,, Rebecca Amariglio,, Trey Hedden,, Dorene M. Rentz,, Keith Johnson,, Reisa Sperling,, Mark W. Albers, & Gad Marshall, & (2014). Olfactory identification and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in clinically normal elderly, Nature Neuroscience,

Seonjoo Lee, New York State Psychiatric, Institute; Jennifer Manly, Columbia University Medical Center; Howard Andrews, Columbia University; Nicole, Schupf,, Adam M. Brickman,, Elan Louis,, Yaakov Stern, & Richard Mayeux, (2014). Olfactory identification deficits predict the transition from MCI to AD in a multi-ethnic community sample, Nature Neuroscience,

; Yogesan Kanagasingam, CSIRO; Lance Macaulay, CSIRO; Maya, Koronyo-Hamaoui, YOSEF KORONYO,, David Biggs,, Steven Verdooner, Keith Black,, Kevin Taddei,, Tejal Shah,, Stephanie Rainey,, Victor Villemagne, & Christopher Cleon Rowe, (2014). Retinal amyloid fluorescence imaging predicts cerebral amyloid burden and Alzheimer's disease , Nature Neuroscience,

Charles Kerbage,, carl sadowsky,, Pierre Tariot,, Marc Agronin,, Gustavo Alva,, Darell Turner,, Dennis Nilan,, Anne Cameron, & Gerald Cagle, (2014). Detection of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lenses of human eyes, Nature Neuroscience,

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1:23 PM | Language and handedness
  I am both left handed and dyslexic and so a recent paper on the connection in hemispheric dominance for hand and for language was a paper I had to read. The Mazoyer study seems to be the first to use a reasonable number of left- and as well as right-handed people to look at […]

Mazoyer, B., Zago, L., Jobard, G., Crivello, F., Joliot, M., Perchey, G., Mellet, E., Petit, L. & Tzourio-Mazoyer, N. (2014). Gaussian Mixture Modeling of Hemispheric Lateralization for Language in a Large Sample of Healthy Individuals Balanced for Handedness, PLoS ONE, 9 (6) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0101165

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July 12, 2014

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5:59 PM | Infant once thought Cured of HIV tests Positive
I hate doing sad posts, it’s not my thing. But this is a big deal so I thought I would share it, the child known as the “Mississippi baby” – whom for […]

Persaud, D., Gay, H., Ziemniak, C., Chen, Y., Piatak, M., Chun, T., Strain, M., Richman, D. & Luzuriaga, K. (2013). Absence of Detectable HIV-1 Viremia after Treatment Cessation in an Infant, New England Journal of Medicine, 369 (19) 1828-1835. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1302976

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4:33 PM | I numeri primi e la ricerca delle fondamenta
Nel momento in cui affermiamo che un dato numero è primo, ovvero nel momento in cui affermiamo matematicamente che $n$ è un numero primostiamo, in effetti, affermando che $n$ è un numero naturale divisibile solo per se stesso e per l'unità. Questa definizione può però essere ulteriormente ridotta come segue(1): $n$ è un numero naturale e, presi comunque due numeri naturali $h$ e $k$, se $n$ è $h \cdot k$, allora $h$ o $k$ è 1.E' […]

Quine, W. V. (1964). The Foundations of Mathematics, Scientific American, 211 (3) 112-127. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0964-112

Paul J. Cohen & Reuben Hersh (1967). Non-Cantorian Set Theory, Scientific American, 217 (6) 104-116. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican1267-104

Howard DeLong (1971). Unsolved Problems in Arithmetic, Scientific American, 224 (3) 50-60. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0371-50

Kurt Gödel (1931). Über formal unentscheidbare Sätze der Principia Mathematica und verwandter Systeme I, Monatshefte für Mathematik und Physik, 38-38 (1) 173-198. DOI: 10.1007/BF01700692

Zermelo, E. (1904). Beweis, dass jede Menge wohlgeordnet werden kann, Mathematische Annalen, 59 (4) 514-516. DOI: 10.1007/BF01445300

Kurt Gödel (1938). The Consistency of the Axiom of Choice and of the Generalized Continuum-Hypothesis, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 24 (12) 556-557. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.24.12.556

Paul J. Cohen (1963). The independence of the continuum hypothesis, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 50 (6) 1143-1148. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.50.6.1143

Paul J. Cohen (1964). The independence of the continuum hypothesis, II, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 51 (1) 105-110. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.51.1.105

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3:36 PM | Organic food: meta-analysed
A very quick post to direct you to the paper by Barański and colleagues [1] which is currently making a few headlines and sparking some debate (see here and see here) with their assertions: "the concentrations of a range of antioxidants such as polyphenolics were found to be substantially higher in organic crops/crop-based foods" and "the frequency of occurrence of pesticide residues was found to be four times higher in conventional crops, which also contained significantly […]

Barański M, Srednicka-Tober D, Volakakis N, Seal C, Sanderson R, Stewart GB, Benbrook C, Biavati B, Markellou E, Giotis C & Gromadzka-Ostrowska J (2014). Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses., The British journal of nutrition, 1-18. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24968103

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10:50 AM | Could climate’s crop impact catch us with our plants down?
Global warming has sharply increased the odds of serious problems because of declining harvests, find David Lobell from and Claudia Tebaldi from NCAR, and though that situation remains fairly unlikely, they advise countries to prepare for it.

Lobell, D. & Tebaldi, C. (2014). Getting caught with our plants down: the risks of a global crop yield slowdown from climate trends in the next two decades, Environmental Research Letters, 9 (7) 74003. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/074003

Mora, C., Frazier, A., Longman, R., Dacks, R., Walton, M., Tong, E., Sanchez, J., Kaiser, L., Stender, Y., Anderson, J. & Ambrosino, C. (2013). The projected timing of climate departure from recent variability, Nature, 502 (7470) 183-187. DOI: 10.1038/nature12540

Hawkins, E., Anderson, B., Diffenbaugh, N., Mahlstein, I., Betts, R., Hegerl, G., Joshi, M., Knutti, R., McNeall, D., Solomon, S. & Sutton, R. (2014). Uncertainties in the timing of unprecedented climates, Nature, 511 (7507) DOI: 10.1038/nature13523

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10:01 AM | Media and the Mind: Emotional Contagion
Social media has tremendous power to share ideas, information and emotions to almost anyone or any audience you choose to reach. In the past it was the high level of communication and trade that, […]

Kramer, A., Guillory, J. & Hancock, J. (2014). Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111 (24) 8788-8790. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1320040111

Woolley, A., Chabris, C., Pentland, A., Hashmi, N. & Malone, T. (2010). Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Human Groups, Science, 330 (6004) 686-688. DOI: 10.1126/science.1193147

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6:25 AM | Night-to-night variability of sleep in TBI
It's been a while since I've posted something substantial. My apologies to all 20 followers of TQLC. Academia and clinical cases have been taking up most of my time. However, some exciting news! My paper on variability of respiration during sleep in TBI has recently been accepted into Neurorehabilitation. In the paper my colleagues and I examined the sleep processes of individuals with TBI using polysomnography. Polysomnography is a tool used to measure biophysical changes during […]

Lu W, Cantor J, Aurora RN, Nguyen M, Ashman T, Spielman L, Ambrose A, Krellman J & Gordon W (2014). Variability of respiration and sleep during polysomnography in individuals with TBI., NeuroRehabilitation, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990025

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July 11, 2014

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8:11 PM | Antioxidants can accelerate Cancer, ya really!
Oxidative stress on the body caused by free radicals, billed as a bad thing. Fruits, veggies and just about anything with the word healthy in the title is “jam packed” […]

Phimister, E., Chandel, N. & Tuveson, D. (2014). The Promise and Perils of Antioxidants for Cancer Patients, New England Journal of Medicine, 371 (2) 177-178. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMcibr1405701

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7:14 PM | Carbon-Based Catalyst for Batteries, Fuel Cells Developed
Chemists at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, have developed a carbon-based catalyst for water electrolysis and hydrogen combustion.

Masa, J., Xia, W., Sinev, I., Zhao, A., Sun, Z., Grützke, S., Weide, P., Muhler, M. & Schuhmann, W. (2014). Mn O /NC and Co O /NC Nanoparticles Embedded in a Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Matrix for High-Performance Bifunctional Oxyg, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402710

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6:38 PM | Can one daily drink of alcohol increase risk of heart disease? . . . really?
Can one drink of alcohol increase risk of heart disease?  Reporters are saying a new study says “Yes”.  Many people have been advised through print or conversation that a daily glass of wine or beer is a healthy practice. And it might be for some. Many studies have found a longer lifespan in people who […] The post Can one daily drink of alcohol increase risk of heart disease? . . . really? appeared first on WODMasters: Stiff Competition.

Holmes, M., Dale, C., Zuccolo, L., Silverwood, R., Guo, Y., Ye, Z., Prieto-Merino, D., Dehghan, A., Trompet, S., Wong, A. & Cavadino, A. (2014). Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data, BMJ, 349 (jul10 6) DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g4164

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5:48 PM | X-Rays Help Study Chemical Reactions in Fuel Cells
Using high-brilliance X-rays, scientists studied the chemical process that hydrogen fuel cells use to produce electricity.

Feng, Z., El Gabaly, F., Ye, X., Shen, Z. & Chueh, W. (2014). Fast vacancy-mediated oxygen ion incorporation across the ceria–gas electrochemical interface, Nature Communications, 5 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5374

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5:45 PM | Change your Genes with Stem Cells!
So researchers for the first time were evaluating the safety and reliability of the existing targeted gene correction technologies and in the process they successfully developed a new method of gene […]

Suzuki, K., Yu, C., Qu, J., Li, M., Yao, X., Yuan, T., Goebl, A., Tang, S., Ren, R., Aizawa, E. & Zhang, F. (2014). Targeted Gene Correction Minimally Impacts Whole-Genome Mutational Load in Human-Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Clones, Cell Stem Cell, 15 (1) 31-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.06.016

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3:45 PM | Identifying Illness Through Scent
It’s been known for some time that rats and other animals can detect illness in others of their species based on scent. Rats will actively avoid sick packmates shortly after they fall ill, when there are few visible symptoms. Most people might believe that humans don’t notice sick friends quite so quickly and certainly not […]

Olsson M.J., B. A. Kimball, A. R. Gordon, B. Karshikoff, N. Hosseini, K. Sorjonen, C. Olgart Hoglund, C. Solares, A. Soop & J. Axelsson & (2014). The Scent of Disease: Human Body Odor Contains an Early Chemosensory Cue of Sickness, Psychological Science, 25 (3) 817-823. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797613515681

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2:12 PM | Water and Ice in Hydrogen Fuel Cells Directly Imaged
Scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have, for the first time, directly imaged the distribution of liquid water and ice in a hydrogen fuel cell.

Biesdorf, J., Oberholzer, P., Bernauer, F., Kaestner, A., Vontobel, P., Lehmann, E., Schmidt, T. & Boillat, P. (2014). Dual Spectrum Neutron Radiography: Identification of Phase Transitions between Frozen and Liquid Water, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.248301

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8:48 AM | Maternal C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and offspring schizophrenia
A big quote to start this post: "This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders".Ophelia @ Wikipedia The source for this quote was the paper by Sarah Canetta and colleagues [1] based on an analysis of serum samples from mums for C-reactive protein (CRP) as […]

Canetta, S., Sourander, A., Surcel, H., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., Leiviskä, J., Kellendonk, C., McKeague, I. & Brown, A. (2014). Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Increased Risk of Schizophrenia in a National Birth Cohort, American Journal of Psychiatry, DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13121579

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8:20 AM | Adults, like children, have a tendency to think vision is more informative than it is
Among the cute mistakes that children make, one is to overestimate how much information they can garner through vision. For instance, asked to judge whether they can tell apart two identical-looking, but differently weighted (or different sounding) objects, simply by looking at them, five-year-olds tend to say Yes. Now an intriguing new paper suggests this is an error that we adults fail to completely outgrow.In the second and more persuasive of their experiments, Jessica Wang and her […]

Wang JJ, Diana Miletich D, Ramsey R & Samson D (2014). Adults see vision to be more informative than it is., Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006), 1-14. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24853581

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6:40 AM | Induced pluripotent stem cells in the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa
Researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have have created a way to develop personalized gene therapies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a leading cause of vision loss. The approach, the first of its kind, takes advantage of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) cell technology to transform skin cells into retinal cells, which are then used as a patient-specific model for disease study and preclinical testing.Using this approach, researchers led by Stephen […]

Li Y, Wu WH, Hsu CW, Nguyen HV, Tsai YT, Chan L, Nagasaki T, Maumenee IH, Yannuzzi LA, Hoang QV & Hua H (2014). Gene Therapy in Patient-specific Stem Cell Lines and a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa With Membrane Frizzled-related Protein Defects., Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24895994

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July 10, 2014

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7:43 PM | Scientists Take Snapshots of Photosynthetic Water Oxidation
An international collaboration of scientists led by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has taken detailed “snapshots” of the four photon-step cycle for water oxidation in photosystem II, a large protein complex in green plants.

Kern, J., Tran, R., Alonso-Mori, R., Koroidov, S., Echols, N., Hattne, J., Ibrahim, M., Gul, S., Laksmono, H., Sierra, R. & Gildea, R. (2014). Taking snapshots of photosynthetic water oxidation using femtosecond X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy, Nature Communications, 5 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5371

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6:11 PM | Laser Helps Understand Inner Workings of Solar Panels
Believe it or not we don’t totally understand how solar cells work, particularly organic thin-film photovoltaics. But scientists Canada, London and Cyprus have recently used lasers to shed some light into the process, which could help make more efficient solar panels tomorrow.

Provencher, F., Bérubé, N., Parker, A., Greetham, G., Towrie, M., Hellmann, C., Côté, M., Stingelin, N., Silva, C. & Hayes, S. & (2014). Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions, Nature Communications, 5 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5288

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