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Posts

April 01, 2014

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4:12 PM | Cadet Research Accomplishments Recognized
#NetworkScience NSC Cadets Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowships The Network Science Center had two cadet researchers awarded the prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship: Cadet Damon Paulo (EECS/MATH) and Cadet Geoffrey Moores (EECS/PHYSICS). Additionally, Cadet Joseph Hannigan (EECS) was given an … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Association for Psychological Science announces a new journal
The Association for Psychological Science, the leading organization of research psychologists, announced a long-awaited new journal, Speculations on Psychological Science. From the official APS press release: Speculations on Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association for Psychological Science, will publish cutting-edge research articles, short reports, and research reports spanning the entire spectrum of the […]The post Association for Psychological Science announces […]

March 31, 2014

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2:54 PM | The most-cited statistics papers ever
Robert Grant has a list. I’ll just give the ones with more than 10,000 Google Scholar cites: Cox (1972) Regression and life tables: 35,512 citations. Dempster, Laird, Rubin (1977) Maximum likelihood from incomplete data via the EM algorithm: 34,988 Bland & Altman (1986) Statistical methods for assessing agreement between two methods of clinical measurement: 27,181 […]The post The most-cited statistics papers ever appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: The most-cited statistics papers ever Tues: American Psychological Society announces a new journal Wed: Am I too negative? Thurs: As the boldest experiment in journalism history, you admit you made a mistake Fri: The Notorious N.H.S.T. presents: Mo P-values Mo Problems Sat: Bizarre academic spam Sun: An old discussion of food desertsThe post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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11:52 AM | Dutch Men are not Nordic Men
There are reasons to appreciate Hanna Rosin’s ‘The End of Men’: it was pleasantly written, contains various entertaining anecdotes, and holds an attractive promise of increased gender equality – although, to trumpet the demise of men (to paraphrase page 285) might be somewhat less desirable. It would have made for a relevant book, were it… Continue Reading

Philip Cohen (2013). The “End of Men” Is Not True: What Is Not and What Might Be on the Road Toward Gender Equality, BOSTON UNIVERSITY LAW REVIEW, 1159-1184. Other: Link

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10:19 AM | Just gave a talk
I just gave a talk in Milan. Actually I was sitting at my desk, it was a g+ hangout which was a bit more convenient for me. The audience was a bunch of astronomers so I figured they could handle a satellite link. . . . Anyway, the talk didn’t go so well. Two reasons: […]The post Just gave a talk appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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7:17 AM | Call for Papers: Fafnir 3/2014
Call for Papers: Fafnir 3/2014 Fafnir – Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research invites authors to submit papers for the upcoming edition 3/2014. Fafnir – Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research is a new, peer-reviewed academic … Continue reading →
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6:52 AM | Fooling Ourselves: The Everyday role of Ritual
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:52 AM | Fooling Ourselves: The Everyday role of Ritual
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 30, 2014

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1:41 PM | Adjudicating between alternative interpretations of a statistical interaction?
Jacob Felson writes: Say we have a statistically significant interaction in non-experimental data between two continuous predictors, X and Z and it is unclear which variable is primarily a cause and which variable is primarily a moderator. One person might find it more plausible to think of X as a cause and Z as a […]The post Adjudicating between alternative interpretations of a statistical interaction? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

March 29, 2014

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1:14 PM | References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling
A student writes: I am new to Bayesian methods. While I am reading your book, I have some questions for you. I am interested in doing Bayesian hierarchical (multi-level) linear regression (e.g., random-intercept model) and Bayesian structural equation modeling (SEM)—for causality. Do you happen to know if I could find some articles, where authors could […]The post References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling appeared first […]
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12:15 PM | Mourning Online
Trend stories in The New York Times Sunday Styles section have plenty of problems, but the one last weekend about how this generation of young people is changing how they view death and how they mourn, had one great benefit: it linked to the web site Modern Loss. What a web site.read more
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10:44 AM | ¿Son contagiosos los pensamientos depresivos?
Las emociones pueden ser tan contagiosas como una gripe. Basta una breve interacción con una persona, tal vez una aparentemente intrascendente conversación de ascensor, para que nos inocule el virus […]

Haeffel, GJ & Hames, JL (2014). Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression Can Be Contagious, Clinical Psychological Science, 2 75-85. DOI:

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10:19 AM | I agree with this comment
The anonymous commenter puts it well: The problem is simple, the researchers are disproving always false null hypotheses and taking this disproof as near proof that their theory is correct.The post I agree with this comment appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

March 28, 2014

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5:53 PM | Green Thumbery: A Gardening Series and Winter Sowing
Last summer was the first time I had space to have a garden of my own. I had never really tried to grow anything but marigolds prior to that—and that’s only because they insisted on surviving... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:53 PM | Green Thumbery: A Gardening Series and Winter Sowing
Last summer was the first time I had space to have a garden of my own. I had never really tried to grow anything but marigolds prior to that—and that’s only because they insisted on surviving... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:56 PM | Parenthood, Trial or Tribulation? Part 2
On New Year’s Day I became a parent, sparking my curiosity in the research on parenting and well-being and inspiring a four-part series on parenthood and happiness. This is the second post. Check out the first post here.Are parents happier than non-parents? Researchers have generally set about trying to answer this deceptively simple question in three ways:Are people with children happier than those without children?This is the most common approach to research on parenthood and […]

Callan, V. (1987). The Personal and Marital Adjustment of Mothers and of Voluntarily and Involuntarily Childless Wives, Journal of Marriage and the Family, 49 (4) 847. DOI:

Kahneman, D. (2004). A Survey Method for Characterizing Daily Life Experience: The Day Reconstruction Method, Science, 306 (5702) 1776-1780. DOI:

Lucas, R., Clark, A., Georgellis, Y. & Diener, E. (2003). Reexamining adaptation and the set point model of happiness: Reactions to changes in marital status., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84 (3) 527-539. DOI:

Luhmann, M., Hofmann, W., Eid, M. & Lucas, R. (2012). Subjective well-being and adaptation to life events: A meta-analysis., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102 (3) 592-615. DOI:

Nelson, S., Kushlev, K., English, T., Dunn, E. & Lyubomirsky, S. (2012). In Defense of Parenthood: Children Are Associated With More Joy Than Misery, Psychological Science, 24 (1) 3-10. DOI:

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1:59 PM | Creating a Lenin-style democracy
Mark Palko explains why a penalty for getting the wrong answer on a test (the SAT, which is used in college admissions and which is used in the famous 8 schools example) is not a “penalty for guessing.” Then the very next day he catches this from Todd Balf in the New York Times Magazine: […]The post Creating a Lenin-style democracy appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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12:56 PM | What happened to the world we knew?
I was unlocking my bike, with music turned on low, and a couple of high school kids were lounging around nearby. One of them walked over and asked, « Qui est-ce qui chante? ». I responded, “Stevie Wonder” (not trying any accent on this one). The kid said, « Ees good ».The post What happened to the world we knew? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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12:22 PM | Newsblast Volume 4 Issue 4
#NetworkScience In the current issue of the Network Science Center Newsblast Dan Evans and Louis Boguchwal discuss how development of Small and Medium Enter-prises (SMEs) might be the answer to reduce high rates of youth unemployment and quell civil unrest in the … Continue reading →

March 27, 2014

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1:02 PM | Beyond the Valley of the Trolls
In a further discussion of the discussion about the discussion of a paper in Administrative Science Quarterly, Thomas Basbøll writes: I [Basbøll] feel “entitled”, if that’s the right word (actually, I’d say I feel privileged), to express my opinions to anyone who wants to listen, and while I think it does say something about an […]The post Beyond the Valley of the Trolls appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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6:30 AM | What does it mean to be an introvert online?
Did you take public transportation today? And where did you sit? Did you take the seat on the end? What about your phone at work? Did it actually ring today? Did you let it go to voicemail? In fact,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:30 AM | What does it mean to be an introvert online?
Did you take public transportation today? And where did you sit? Did you take the seat on the end? What about your phone at work? Did it actually ring today? Did you let it go to voicemail? In fact,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 26, 2014

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7:32 PM | New research journal on observational studies
Dylan Small writes: I am starting an observational studies journal that aims to publish papers on all aspects of observational studies, including study protocols for observational studies, methodologies for observational studies, descriptions of data sets for observational studies, software for observational studies and analyses of observational studies. One of the goals of the journal is […]The post New research journal on observational studies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, […]
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1:30 PM | Is I/O Psychology Ruining Human Resources?
In a recent issue of Human Resource Management Journal, Godard[1] provides a provocatively-titled opinion piece: “The psychologisation of employment relations?”  The central arguments of this paper are that 1) human resources management (HRM) is interdisciplinary, 2) industrial relations has historically been an important part of HRM, 3) organizational behavior has taken over HRM, pushing out industrial […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:CFP: Assessing Human […]
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1:10 PM | Is a steal really worth 9 points?
Theodore Vasiloudis writes: I’d like to bring your attention to this article by Benjamin Morris discussing the value of steals for the NBA. The author argues that a steal should be a highly sought after statistic as it equates to higher chances of victory and is very hard to replace when a player is injured. […]The post Is a steal really worth 9 points? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

March 25, 2014

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4:50 PM | Network Science Education Events
#NetworkScience The Network Science Center would like to highlight two up-coming events for researchers and educators in network science education . If you are in the Bay Area 1-2 June see how you can get involved. NetFest 2014: Bay Area … Continue reading →
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1:37 PM | A statistical graphics course and statistical graphics advice
Dean Eckles writes: Some of my coworkers at Facebook and I have worked with Udacity to create an online course on exploratory data analysis, including using data visualizations in R as part of EDA. The course has now launched at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud651 so anyone can take it for free. And Kaiser Fung has reviewed it. So definitely feel free […]The post A statistical graphics course and statistical graphics advice appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
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4:32 AM | Creeping Connectivity: Work and Life in a Hyper-Connected World
It’s 10:30 PM on a Sunday night. I’ve finished folding our laundry and just started the dishwasher. As on most Sundays, S and I just finished watching The Walking Dead. Although while he... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:32 AM | Creeping Connectivity: Work and Life in a Hyper-Connected World
It’s 10:30 PM on a Sunday night. I’ve finished folding our laundry and just started the dishwasher. As on most Sundays, S and I just finished watching The Walking Dead. Although while he... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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