Posts

July 04, 2014

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8:07 PM | Any colour, as long as it is black (Impactology case)
I have noticed that since I got myself the Macbook Pro Retina 13″, it has gradually been taking over my work travels, as well as being the main computer while at home. Since this Mac has been coming from my … Continue reading →
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4:56 PM | June 2014: How to get your sperm swimming like Michael Phelps
How to get a man’s sperm swimming like a shoal of miniature Michael Phelpses, and why expensive handbags are a weapon of war. We also find out what time of the month the idea of incest is most likely to make you throw up. Download the MP3New research shows that it's not just men who get excited by attractive women: their sperm do too.The articles covered in the show:Antfolk, J., Lieberman, D., Albrecht, A., & Santtila, P. (2014). The self-regulation effect of fertility status on […]
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1:56 PM | Dimensionless analysis as applied to swimming!
We have no fireworks-related posts for July 4th but at least we have an item that’s appropriate for the summer weather. It comes from Daniel Lakeland, who writes: Recently in one of your blog posts (“priors I don’t believe”) there was a discussion in which I was advocating the use of dimensional analysis and dimensionless […] The post Dimensionless analysis as applied to swimming! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

July 03, 2014

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2:16 PM | Hub Accra
On previous blogs, I have described visits to several tech hubs and incubators across the African Continent. I recently visited Accra, Ghana and previously wrote about a recent visit to the Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology (MEST). This blog introduces … Continue reading →
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1:43 PM | “The great advantage of the model-based over the ad hoc approach, it seems to me, is that at any given time we know what we are doing.”
The quote is from George Box, 1979. And this: Please can Data Analysts get themselves together again and become whole Statisticians before it is too late? Before they, their employers, and their clients forget the other equally important parts of the job statisticians should be doing, such as designing investigations and building models? I actually […] The post “The great advantage of the model-based over the ad hoc approach, it seems to me, is that at any given time we know what […]

July 02, 2014

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3:02 PM | Fertility Clinics and False Hope
IVF pioneer Lord Robert Winston calls the fertility industry an unregulated "jungle" that makes misleading promises for the sake of the bottom line. And he has some pretty harsh words for egg freezing, too.read more
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1:30 PM | Is Outrage Over the Facebook Mood Manipulation Study Ignorance or Anti-Science?
By now, you’ve probably heard about the latest controversy coming from Facebook – a researcher internal to Facebook, along with two university collaborators, recently published a paper in PNAS[1] that included an experimental manipulation of mood. Specifically, the researchers randomly assigned about 700,000 Facebook users to test an interesting causal question: does the emotional content […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:When You Are Popular on Facebook, Strangers Think […]
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1:30 PM | “Being an informed Bayesian: Assessing prior informativeness and prior–likelihood conflict”
Xiao-Li Meng sends along this paper (coauthored with Matthew Reimherr and Dan Nicolae), which begins: Dramatically expanded routine adoption of the Bayesian approach has substantially increased the need to assess both the confirmatory and contradictory information in our prior distribution with regard to the information provided by our likelihood function. We propose a diagnostic approach […] The post “Being an informed Bayesian: Assessing prior informativeness and […]

July 01, 2014

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4:38 PM | Randy Schekman: Ehrlicher Austausch von Wissen – Lindau 2014
Randy Schekman ist davon überzeugt, dass Wissenschaftler ihre Forschung auf verständliche und gut austarierte Weise kommunizieren können. Ein Gespräch. Gestern Morgen hatten einige Journalisten das Vergnügen noch vor seinem Eröffnungsvortrag der Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung 2014 ein Interview mit Randy Schekman führen zu dürfen. Schekman hatte kurz nach der Verleihung des Nobelpreises für Medizin 2013 mit seinen klaren Äußerungen […]
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3:39 PM | Neurocomic: el cerebro explicado a través del arte
Matteo Farinella es un personaje curioso. Es un artista italiano y además tiene un doctorado en Neurociencia, conseguido en el University College de Londres. Ha publicado artículos de investigación en […]
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3:34 PM | Neurocomic: the brain explained through art
Matteo Farinella is a curious character. He is an Italian artist and also holds a Ph. D. in Neuroscience, awarded at the University College London. He has published research articles […]
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1:20 PM | “Who’s bigger”—the new book that ranks every human on Wikipedia—is more like Bill Simmons than Bill James
I received a copy of “Who’s Bigger?: Where Historical Figures Really Rank,” by Steven Skiena, a computer scientist at Stony Brook University, and Charles Ward, and engineer at Google. Here’s the blurb I gave the publisher: Skiena and Ward provide a numerical ranking for the every Wikipedia resident who’s ever lived. What a great idea! […] The post “Who’s bigger”—the new book that ranks every human on Wikipedia—is more like Bill […]

June 30, 2014

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10:05 PM | Guardian Science Policy Event: What Role Can Social Media Play in Science Policy?
I recently organised an event for the Guardian Political Science - here’s a copy of the report I wrote for it. Last week saw the UCL Science and Technology Studies department host the first in a series of new events run in … Continue reading →
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3:28 PM | Who invented the Metropolis algorithm?
Paul Alper writes: I found this at the 15:57 mark of one of Bill Press’s videos but do not know if this bit of history is well known in the MCMC universe. This is Marshall Rosenbluth criticizing Metropolis (and others). The text is taken from an interview of Rosenbluth in 2003 by Kai-Henrik Barth: Barth: […] The post Who invented the Metropolis algorithm? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:31 PM | Out of the Lab & Into the Mouth
Many pitfalls await the undergraduate in the laboratory. Bunsen burners! Liquid nitrogen! The slack work ethic of one’s peers! The dreaded group projects! But the most common risk budding researchers face are the rubber glove-donners themselves, perpetrator and victim rolled into one lab coat-wearing pipetter, armed and often dangerous with great knowledge but little know-how. […]The post Out of the Lab & Into the Mouth appeared first on Body Horrors.
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: Who invented the Metropolis algorithm? Tues: “Who’s bigger”—the new book that ranks every human on Wikipedia—is more like Bill Simmons than Bill James Wed: “Being an informed Bayesian: Assessing prior informativeness and prior–likelihood conflict” Thurs: “The great advantage of the model-based over the ad hoc approach, it seems to me, is that at any […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
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10:26 AM | Bitcoin and decentralized notary services for information sharing
#NetworkScience Bitcoin, https://bitcoin.org/en/, is: • an electronic payment system and also • an electronic currency (albeit a very volatile currency). Bitcoin has several properties, [cite ted series]: • Privacy (users can conduct transactions using pseudonyms) • Open (the underlying technology … Continue reading →

June 29, 2014

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4:03 PM | Scott Adams blogging
Some of my commenters (you know who you are) demand more Scott-Adams-related content. So I went over to the Dilbert blog and found two interesting recent items: The Pivot: I’m not particularly interested in the topic (rich guys getting richer) but Adams usefully deploys statistical thinking in this one (“Success simply can’t be predicted to […] The post Scott Adams blogging appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

June 28, 2014

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1:00 PM | Useless Algebra, Inefficient Computation, and Opaque Model Specifications
I (Bob, not Andrew) doubt anyone sets out to do algebra for the fun of it, implement an inefficient algorithm, or write a paper where it’s not clear what the model is. But… Why not write it in BUGS or Stan? Over on the Stan users group, Robert Grant wrote Hello everybody, I’ve just been […] The post Useless Algebra, Inefficient Computation, and Opaque Model Specifications appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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