Posts

December 01, 2014

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3:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: Quick tips on giving research presentations Tues: How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. Wed: If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies Thurs: Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing Fri: The persistence of the “schools are […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:00 PM | On deck this month
Here goes: Quick tips on giving research presentations How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing The persistence of the “schools are failing” story line […] The post On deck this month appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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4:55 AM | Before & After: Respiratory Microbes among Pilgrims to the Hajj
The Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca by millions of Muslims from around the world, is one of the largest gatherings of man on the face of the earth. This annual event took place just last month with relatively little fanfare from the news media, which is, from an epidemiological standpoint, a very good thing. Every […]The post Before & After: Respiratory Microbes among Pilgrims to the Hajj appeared first on Body Horrors.
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4:55 AM | Before & After: Respiratory Microbes among Pilgrims to the Hajj
The Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca by millions of Muslims from around the world, is one of the largest gatherings of man on the face of the earth. This annual event took place just last month with relatively little fanfare from the news media, which is, from an epidemiological standpoint, a very good thing. Every year, public health officials wring their hands at the thought of possible outbreaks caused by the global pathogen du jour capitalizing upon the convergence of millions of worshipers in

November 30, 2014

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9:37 PM | How (not) to justify running a QCA
Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is a method utilized by different disciplines in the social sciences and beyond, e.g., business economics and management. However, QCA users must still justify their choice of method more frequently than the users of other methods. … Continue reading →
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2:54 PM | A question about varying-intercept, varying-slope multilevel models for cross-national analysis
Sean de Hoon writes: In many cross-national comparative studies, mixed effects models are being used in which a number of slopes are fixed and the slopes of one or two variables of interested are allowed to vary across countries. The aim is often then to explain the varying slopes by referring to some country-level characteristic. […] The post A question about varying-intercept, varying-slope multilevel models for cross-national analysis appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]

November 29, 2014

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11:35 PM | Open Access journal article processing charges
Article Processing Charges (APC) of Gold Open Access journals are very often deeply hidden in journal websites. Sometimes they aren’t even stated on the journal website, eg. “For inquiries relating to the publication fee of articles, please contact the editorial office“. The lack of good overviews hinders research into APCs between different publishers and journals. […] The post Open Access journal article processing charges appeared first on WoW! Wouter on the Web.
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2:46 PM | Unstrooping names
Baptiste Coulmont writes: Following your recent blog post on stroopy names, I do not resist the temptation to send you a recent article on first name changes in France. The point of the article is simple: people who change their first names often explicitly speak about national identity changes in their request for a new […] The post Unstrooping names appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

November 28, 2014

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2:39 PM | Arizona plagiarism update
More details on the Matthew Whitaker case from Brian Gratton and from Rick Shenkman. Shenkman even goes to the trouble of interviewing some of the people involved. It’s not pretty. One of the people involved in this sad, sad story, is Michael Crow, formerly at Columbia and currently president of the University of Arizona, about […] The post Arizona plagiarism update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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10:37 AM | Researchers at Tampere universities examine neonatal cry for markers of child development and health
A new study at the Tampere Center for Child Health Research investigates whether the analysis of the acoustic properties of neonatal cry reveals information that could be used in the...

November 27, 2014

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10:00 PM | Thanksgiving Tidbits
Now that you’ve filled yourself with good company and good food and you’re settled on your couch, how about some light reading before the tryptophan sets in? I’ve assembled some of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:00 PM | Thanksgiving Tidbits
Now that you’ve filled yourself with good company and good food and you’re settled on your couch, how about some light reading before the tryptophan sets in? I’ve assembled some of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:24 PM | ¿Tienes miedo a ir al dentista? Explora tus pensamientos sobre ello…y los de tu familia
El miedo y la ansiedad ante los tratamientos dentales están ampliamente extendidos en la población tanto infantil como adulta, con importantes consecuencias no sólo para el bienestar emocional del individuo […]

Crego A, Carrillo-Diaz M, Armfield JM & Romero M (2013). Applying the Cognitive Vulnerability Model to the analysis of cognitive and family influences on children's dental fear., European journal of oral sciences, 121 (3 Pt 1) 194-203. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23659243

Citation
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2:51 PM | Quantitative literacy is tough! Or, I had no idea that, in 1958, 96% of Americans disapproved of interracial marriage!
Mark Palko linked to this data-rich cartoon by Randall Munroe: And I was stunned, first by the data on interracial marriage and then, retrospectively, by my earlier ignorance of these data. Was approval of interracial marriage only 4% in 1958? I had no idea. I looked it up at the Gallup site and it seems […] The post Quantitative literacy is tough! Or, I had no idea that, in 1958, 96% of Americans disapproved of interracial marriage! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]

November 26, 2014

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11:41 PM | Thanksgiving Live Blog 2015
Happy Thanksgiving from the D’Costas! Back in 2011, I experimented with sharing my Thanksgiving with you, Readers, and I thought it might be time for a resurrection, so welcome to our kitchen... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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11:41 PM | Thanksgiving Live Blog 2015
Happy Thanksgiving from the D’Costas! Back in 2011, I experimented with sharing my Thanksgiving with you, Readers, and I thought it might be time for a resurrection, so welcome to our kitchen... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:50 PM | The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It
Once upon a time, people died in their homes. Up until the time of death they were cared for by friends, family members, and appointed religious leaders. (The latter reminded the dying and their... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:50 PM | The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It
Once upon a time, people died in their homes. Up until the time of death they were cared for by friends, family members, and appointed religious leaders. (The latter reminded the dying and their... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:56 PM | Editorial Manager and password security for academics
Today, Nature published a news feature by Cat Ferguson, Adam Marcus and Ivan Oransky (Retraction Watch) in which I am quoted about some problems with Editorial Manager (EM). This post provides the background to what I say there. Disclaimer: I am not … Continue reading →
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2:30 PM | Leif and Uri need to hang out with a better class of statisticians
Noted psychology researchers and methods skeptics Leif Nelson and Uri Simonsohn write: A recent Psych Science (.pdf) paper found that sports teams can perform worse when they have too much talent. For example, in Study 3 they found that NBA teams with a higher percentage of talented players win more games, but that teams with […] The post Leif and Uri need to hang out with a better class of statisticians appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

November 25, 2014

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2:38 PM | I (almost and inadvertently) followed Dan Kahan’s principles in my class today, and that was a good thing (would’ve even been more of a good thing had I realized what I was doing and done it better, but I think I will do better in the future, which has already happened by the time you read this; remember, the blog is on a nearly 2-month lag)
As you might recall, the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor says that to explain a concept to an unbeliever, explain it conditionally. For example, if you want to talk evolution with a religious fundamentalist, don’t try to convince him or her that evolution is true; instead preface each explanation with, “According to the theory of evolution […] The post I (almost and inadvertently) followed Dan Kahan’s principles in my class today, and that was a good thing […]
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2:19 PM | The Best Seat at the Table
#NetworkScience Repost of study submitted two years ago by then Cadet now 2LT Jeffrey Nielsen With Thanksgiving fast approaching some people might be wondering, what is the best seat at the Thanksgiving table? Two years ago as an independent project, CDT … Continue reading →
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1:44 PM | No Activation without Reconciliation?
I am very pleased to announce that I received research funding for a project titled “No Activation without Reconciliation?”. This project will be my main focus in the whole of 2015. From the proposal: This research proposal seeks to complement the strong micro-econometric tradition in evaluating out- comes of active labour market programs (ALMP) with… Continue Reading

November 24, 2014

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3:36 PM | The hype cycle starts again
Completely uncritical press coverage of a speculative analysis. But, hey, it was published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PPNAS)! What could possibly go wrong? Here’s what Erik Larsen writes: In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, People search for meaning when they approach a […] The post The hype cycle starts again appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: The hype cycle starts again Tues: I (almost and inadvertently) followed Dan Kahan’s principles in my class today, and that was a good thing (would’ve even been more of a good thing had I realized what I was doing and done it better, but I think I will do better in the future, which […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:34 AM | What do Rick Santorum and Andrew Cuomo have in common?
Besides family values, that is? Both these politicians seem to have a problem with the National Weather Service: The Senator: Santorum also accused the weather service’s National Hurricane Center of flubbing its forecasts for Hurricane Katrina’s initial landfall in Florida, despite the days of all-too-prescient warnings the agency had given that the storm would subsequently […] The post What do Rick Santorum and Andrew Cuomo have in common? appeared first on Statistical […]

November 23, 2014

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11:22 PM | The invisible web is still there, and it is probably larger than ever
Book review: Devine, J., & Egger-Sider, F. (2014). Going beyond Google again : strategies for using and teaching the Invisible Web. Chicago: Neal-Schuman, an imprint of the American Library Association. ISBN 9781555708986, 180p. The invisible web, as we know it, dates back to at least 2001. In that year both Sherman & Price (2001) as […] The post The invisible web is still there, and it is probably larger than ever appeared first on WoW! Wouter on the Web.
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2:53 PM | Princeton Abandons Grade Deflation Plan . . .
. . . and Kaiser Fung is unhappy. In a post entitled, “Princeton’s loss of nerve,” Kaiser writes: This development is highly regrettable, and a failure of leadership. (The new policy leaves it to individual departments to do whatever they want.) The recent Alumni publication has two articles about this topic, one penned by President […] The post Princeton Abandons Grade Deflation Plan . . . appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

November 22, 2014

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4:54 PM | Common-knowledge arbitrage
Hypothesis 1: Ask people what they think about a stock or a political issue, and also what they think “most people” think. Where these guesses are the same, predictions about the outcome will be right. Where they differ, outcomes will have more upsets. There are a few places where I would ultimately want to see […]
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2:53 PM | Blogs > Twitter
Tweeting has its virtues, I’m sure. But over and over I’m seeing these blog vs. twitter battles where the blogger wins. It goes like this: blogger gives tons and tons of evidence, tweeter responds with a content-free dismissal. The most recent example (as of this posting; remember we’re on an approx 2-month delay here; yes, […] The post Blogs > Twitter appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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