Posts

October 15, 2014

+
8:55 PM | My course on Statistical Communication and Graphics
We will study and practice many different aspects of statistical communication, including graphing data and fitted models, programming in Rrrrrrrr, writing for specialized and general audiences, lecturing, working with students and colleagues, and combining words and pictures in different ways. You learn by doing: each week we have two classes that are full of student […] The post My course on Statistical Communication and Graphics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
+
3:51 PM | The Fault in Our Stars: It’s even worse than they say
In our recent discussion of publication bias, a commenter link to a recent paper, “Star Wars: The Empirics Strike Back,” by Abel Brodeur, Mathias Le, Marc Sangnier, Yanos Zylberberg, who point to the notorious overrepresentation in scientific publications of p-values that are just below 0.05 (that is, just barely statistically significant at the conventional level) […] The post The Fault in Our Stars: It’s even worse than they say appeared first on Statistical […]
+
1:30 PM | Do Interactive Experiences Aid Employee Recruitment?
Many modern organizations try to compete for top talent by adding fancy, interactive experiences to their recruitment process – think of something like a virtual tour.  Such interactive experiences are expensive, but their creators hope that they will attract a higher class of recruit.  New research from Badger, Kaminsky and Behrend[1] in the Journal of Managerial […]The post Do Interactive Experiences Aid Employee Recruitment? appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related […]
+
8:38 AM | How You Feel About People is Related to How You Feel About Cities
You take delight not in a city's seven or seventy wonders, but in the answer it gives to a question of yours. (Calvino, 1978, p. 44).There are numerous structural factors that influence people’s attitudes towards cities, including the city’s architecture, size, infrastructure, transport, crime rates, population density, and quality of housing, to name just a few.  However, as the Italian writer Calvino (1978) alluded to in his book Invisible Cities, these factors may be […]

Rubin, M. & Morrison, T. (2014). Individual Differences in Individualism and Collectivism Predict Ratings of Virtual Cities’ Liveability and Environmental Quality, The Journal of General Psychology, 141 (4) 348-372. DOI: 10.1080/00221309.2014.938721

Citation
+
3:21 AM | What Kinds of Support Are Most Supportive?
[…]

October 14, 2014

+
11:53 PM | I didn’t say that! Part 2
Uh oh, this is getting kinda embarrassing. The Garden of Forking Paths paper, by Eric Loken and myself, just appeared in American Scientist. Here’s our manuscript version (“The garden of forking paths: Why multiple comparisons can be a problem, even when there is no ‘fishing expedition’ or ‘p-hacking’ and the research hypothesis was posited ahead […] The post I didn’t say that! Part 2 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
+
3:13 PM | In one of life’s horrible ironies, I wrote a paper “Why we (usually) don’t have to worry about multiple comparisons” but now I spend lots of time worrying about multiple comparisons
Exhibit A: [2012] Why we (usually) don’t have to worry about multiple comparisons. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness 5, 189-211. (Andrew Gelman, Jennifer Hill, and Masanao Yajima) Exhibit B: The garden of forking paths: Why multiple comparisons can be a problem, even when there is no “fishing expedition” or “p-hacking” and the research hypothesis […] The post In one of life’s horrible ironies, I wrote a paper “Why we (usually) […]
+
1:00 PM | On deck this week
Tues: In one of life’s horrible ironies, I wrote a paper “Why we (usually) don’t have to worry about multiple comparisons” but now I spend lots of time worrying about multiple comparisons Wed: The Fault in Our Stars: It’s even worse than they say Thurs: Buggy-whip update Fri: The inclination to deny all variation Sat: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

October 13, 2014

+
10:41 PM | An Epidemic of “Maps”
If you are a member of the Facebook, Tumblr, Pintrest, or Iumgr community, you have most likely seen posts like this show up in your feed as of late with […]

October 12, 2014

+
8:47 PM | 10th anniversary of “Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science”
Richard Morey pointed out the other day that this blog is 10 years old! During this time, we’ve had 5688 posts, 48799 comments, and who knows how many readers. On this tenth anniversary, I’d like to thank my collaborators on all the work I’ve blogged, my co-bloggers (“This post is by Phil”), our commenters, Alex […] The post 10th anniversary of “Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, […]
+
3:13 AM | “Illinois chancellor who fired Salaita accused of serial self-plagiarism.”
I came across a couple of stories today that made me wonder how much we can learn from a scholar’s professional misconduct. The first was a review by Kimberle Crenshaw of a book by Joan Biskupic about Supreme Court judge Sonia Sotomayor. Crenshaw makes the interesting point that Sotomayor, like many political appointees of the […] The post “Illinois chancellor who fired Salaita accused of serial self-plagiarism.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, […]

October 11, 2014

+
5:02 PM | iPhone 6: boring, but must-have?
There have been substantial delays in my advance order for iPhone 6 Plus (apparently Apple underestimated the demand), and I have had some time to reflect on why I want to get the damned thing in the first place. There … Continue reading →
+
1:57 PM | Science tells us that fast food lovers are more likely to marry other fast food lovers
Emma Pierson writes: I’m a statistician working at the genetics company 23andMe before pursuing a master’s in statistics at Oxford on a Rhodes scholarship. I’ve really enjoyed reading your blog, and we’ve been doing some social science research at 23andMe which I thought might be of interest. We have about half a million customers answering […] The post Science tells us that fast food lovers are more likely to marry other fast food lovers appeared first on […]

October 10, 2014

+
1:28 PM | When am I a conservative and when am I a liberal (when it comes to statistics, that is)?
Here I am one day: Let me conclude with a statistical point. Sometimes researchers want to play it safe by using traditional methods — most notoriously, in that recent note by Michael Link, president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, arguing against non-probability sampling on the (unsupported) grounds that such methods have “little […] The post When am I a conservative and when am I a liberal (when it comes to statistics, that is)? appeared first on […]
+
12:19 PM | Ludification renews the culture, society and businesses – a wide-ranging new research project starts
“Pervasive ludification and gamification, as well as the spreading of interactive media and online services are changing social interaction and the practices of work, learning and leisure as we speak,”...

October 09, 2014

+
10:35 PM | Varieties of description in political science
Markus Kreuzer writes: I am organizing a panel at next year’s American Political Science Association meeting tentatively entitled “Varieties of Description.” The idea is to compare and contrast the ways in which different disciplines approach descriptive inferences, that how they go about collective data, how they validate descriptive inferences and what ontological assumptions they make. […] The post Varieties of description in political science appeared first on […]
+
1:23 PM | “Science does not advance by guessing”
I agree with Deborah Mayo who agrees with Carlo Rovelli that “Science does not advance by guessing. It advances by new data or by a deep investigation of the content and the apparent contradictions of previous empirically successful theories.” And, speaking as a statistician and statistical educator, I think there’s a big problem with the […] The post “Science does not advance by guessing” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]

October 08, 2014

+
5:04 PM | Nuevas direcciones en psicología y salud cardiovascular
Las enfermedades cardiovasculares son la primera causa de muerte a nivel global. Según datos de la Organización Mundial de la Salud, 17.3 millones de personas murieron debido a enfermedades cardiovasculares […]

Matthews, K (2013). Matters of the heart: advancing psychological perspectives on cardiovascular diseases, Perspectives on Psychological Science, 8 (6) 676-678. DOI: 10.1177/1745691613506908

Citation
+
1:30 PM | Don’t Take Hiring Advice from Google
A number of articles have been appearing in my news feeds lately from representatives of Google talking about hiring interviews. Specifically, Mashable picked up a Q&A exchange posted on Quora in which someone asked: “Is there a link between job interview performance and job performance?” As any industrial/organizational (I/O) psychologist knows, the answer is, “It depends.” […]The post Don’t Take Hiring Advice from Google appeared first on […]
+
1:23 PM | When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes
This story has two points: 1. There’s a tendency for scientific results to be framed in absolute terms (in psychology, this corresponds to general claims about the population) but that can be a mistake in that sometimes the most important part of the story is variation; and 2. Before getting to the comparisons, it can […] The post When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes appeared first on Statistical […]
+
11:47 AM | New research into ludification and gamification
[Reposted research news from the University of Tampere:] “Pervasive ludification and gamification, as well as the spreading of interactive media and online services are changing social interaction and the practices of work, learning and leisure as we speak,” says Professor Frans Mäyrä … Continue reading →

October 07, 2014

+
1:35 PM | Rational != Self-interested
I’ve said it before (along with Aaron Edlin and Noah Kaplan) and I’ll say it again. Rationality and self-interest are two dimensions of behavior. An action can be: 1. Rational and self-interested 2. Irrational and self-interested 3. Rational and altruistic 4. Irrational and altruistic. It’s easy enough to come up with examples of all of […] The post Rational != Self-interested appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
10:41 AM | An apology
Hi, everyone. I just wanted to record a quick message to apologise to those of you whose iTunes got absolutely swamped with all my old episodes yesterday.I think the reason it happened is because I changed some of the iTunes settings to allow all of those old episodes to be available for people to download if they wanted to. They'd dropped off the bottom of the list for some reason and I wanted to make them available again. But "Johnny Apple" decided to take it all a bit too literally and throw […]

October 06, 2014

+
9:26 PM | “We have used Stan to study dead dolphins”
In response to our call for references to successful research using Stan, Matthieu Authier points us to this: @article{ year={2014}, journal={Biodiversity and Conservation}, volume={23}, number={10}, doi={10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, title={How much are stranding records affected by variation in reporting rates? A case study of small delphinids in the Bay of Biscay}, url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, keywords={Monitoring; Marine mammal; Strandings}, author={Authier, Matthieu […]
+
6:47 PM | “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.”
Love the Liberry is still going strong. The post “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
3:49 PM | Toothbrushes are up to 95% less effective after 3 months and hugging your children regularly can raise their risk of anxiety, alcoholism, or depression by up to 95%
It sounds impossible, but this statistic is true: Hugging your child regularly can raise his or her risk of anxiety, alcoholism, or depression by up to 95%. I don’t even need a citation. Does it mean parents should stop hugging their children? No. You’d think that it couldn’t possibly be right, but the truth is […]
+
3:30 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Tues: Rational != Self-interested Wed: When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes Thurs: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:00 PM | On deck this month
Lots of good stuff in the queue: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Rational != Self-interested When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements […] The post On deck this month appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
11:02 AM | September 2014: Why single, sex-hungry men crave an iPhone
This month we discover which personality traits make a person lucky in love. Also, how men and women respond differently when their partner is complimented, and why single men crave iPhones. Download the MP3What kind of man is desperate to buy an iPhone? New research suggests it's not only the kind of man who has the time and inclination to make himself a smartphone hat.The articles covered in the show:Hennighausen, C., & Schwab, F. (2014). Relationship status moderates men's conspicuous […]
+
11:00 AM | Abercrombie on ‘paralanguage’
There is an urgent need for the comparative study, over as much of the world as possible, of the full range of paralinguistic phenomena — the kind of thing for which the linguistic field-worker is best fitted. Fact-finding, not theorising, … Continue reading →
123
87 Results