Posts

April 04, 2015

+
1:33 PM | “Thinking about the possibility of spurious correlation isn’t a matter of liking—it should be pretty much automatic.”
I agree with sociologist David Weakliem when he writes the above sentence. Here’s the full paragraph: Krugman says, “you can, if you like, try to argue that this relationship is spurious, maybe not causal.” Actually, I [Weakliem] liked his original figure, since I agree with Krugman on economic policy. But thinking about the possibility of […] The post “Thinking about the possibility of spurious correlation isn’t a matter of liking—it should be pretty […]

April 03, 2015

+
4:00 PM | John Updike vs. George Carlin (2); Hobbes and Dick advance
Yesterday‘s winners were determined by Zbicylist’s comment: Nasty, brutish and short — and not necessarily human. Pretty good, but now that Hobbes has made it into the Final Four, the competition’s stiffer. He’ll need something better than “nasty, brutish, and short” to get past Cervantes and make it into the final. And today we fill […] The post John Updike vs. George Carlin (2); Hobbes and Dick advance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, […]
+
1:49 PM | A rare topical post
Harvey Motulsky writes: Every year at passover, I struggle to peel two dozen hard boiled eggs and search the web to see if there isn’t a trick to do it better. But all the hits say the same thing: put the eggs in cold water, then bring to a boil. But this guy [J. Kenji […] The post A rare topical post appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 02, 2015

+
4:11 PM | Do Individuals with Deletions in the SFPQ Gene will get Down Syndrome and later develop a Frontotemporal Disorder with NFT?
Usually children with Down syndrome have trisomy 21: They inherited an extra copy of chromosome 21 leading to 3 copies (one from Mom, one from Dad, plus one extra). In this article I suggest that there might be children with Down syndrome which don't have trisomy 21 but deletions in the gene SFPQ which is located on chromosome 1. In addition I provide some evidence that these individuals could develop a frontotemporal disorder with NFT in late adulthood. 1. Introduction... Read more
+
4:00 PM | Round of 8 bracket; Ed Wood (3) vs. Thomas Hobbes; Philip K. Dick (2) vs. Jane Austen
Paul Davidson sends along the updated bracket, along with the comment that the writers seem to be doing very well. True! The 8 remaining contestants include 5 writers (along with one comedian, one philosopher, and one cult figure). Yesterday we had no competition because I was afraid that people would not take it seriously on […] The post Round of 8 bracket; Ed Wood (3) vs. Thomas Hobbes; Philip K. Dick (2) vs. Jane Austen appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
+
1:08 PM | There are 5 ways to get fired from Caesars: (1) theft, (2) sexual harassment, (3) running an experiment without a control group, (4) keeping a gambling addict away from the casino, and (5) chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings
We first encountered the famous casino operator in February, 2011, when Michael Schrage was hyping the data-driven philosophy of its CEO, Gary Loveman, in Technology Review. Here’s a typical bit from the article: Schrage: What do you like to tell your academic colleagues about the challenges of real-world experimentation and innovation? Loveman: Honestly, my only […] The post There are 5 ways to get fired from Caesars: (1) theft, (2) sexual harassment, (3) running an experiment […]
+
6:10 AM | Then and Now: April Fools’ Day—How did we get here?
Where is here exactly? Here is a tired, eye-roll inducing pseudo-holiday that we endure with a grimace every year. Hopefully you have room for one more article about April Fools’ Day. Maybe you... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
6:10 AM | Then and Now: April Fools’ Day—How did we get here?
Where is here exactly? Here is a tired, eye-roll inducing pseudo-holiday that we endure with a grimace every year. Hopefully you have room for one more article about April Fools’ Day. Maybe you... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

April 01, 2015

+
3:14 PM | Cultural arbitrariness is not the thing that is at the root of how race doesn’t exist.
On the old Radiolab episode about race, the producers used an interesting fact to make an argument that race doesn’t exist — that it’s entirely a social construct. It turns out that the genetic variability within races is greater than the variability between races; the average difference between two people of the same race is […]
+
1:30 PM | Grade Predictor Add-in for Blackboard Learn
If you teach college classes like I do, around this time of year you begin to get an astonishing number of emails of the “Can I pass?” and “What do I need to get some arbitrary grade I’ve decided is a worthwhile goal?” variety. Although I’m happy to help these students feel better about their […]The post Grade Predictor Add-in for Blackboard Learn appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:Can Graduate Students Grade Writing As […]
+
1:00 PM | Enough with the replication police
Can’t those shameless little bullies just let scientists do their research in peace? If a hypothesis test is statistically significant and a result is published in a real journal, that should be enough for any self-styled skeptic. Can you imagine what might happen if any published result could be questioned—by anybody? You’d have serious psychology […] The post Enough with the replication police appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]

March 31, 2015

+
6:08 PM | The Ringworm Irradiators
Ringworm is one of the most common and widespread childhood maladies. Deceptive in its naming, ringworm is no parasite but rather a fairly mild, though atrociously itchy, fungal skin infection that affects 300 million people worldwide. An infection with the contagious Tinea capitis fungus is usually summarily dismissed by means of antifungal medications, but for decades prior to the discovery of such cures in the 1950s, infections with ringworm and other species of fungus were as intractable and
+
4:00 PM | The round of 8 begins: Mark Twain (4) vs. Miguel de Cervantes (2); Carlin advances
For yesterday‘s contest I really really really wanted to pick John Waters. For one thing, of all the 64 people in the bracket, he’s the one I think I’d like to hear the most. For another, he’s still alive and just might conceivably be amused enough by this whole contest to come up from Baltimore […] The post The round of 8 begins: Mark Twain (4) vs. Miguel de Cervantes (2); Carlin advances appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
+
3:05 PM | Newsblast Volume 5 Issue 3
#NetworkScience In the current issue of the Network Science Center’s Newsblast Jeffrey Julum discusses the idea of an ungoverned space and why it is important to have tools such as network science to begin to understand them.  To learn more about … Continue reading →
+
1:16 PM | Time-release pedagogy??
Mark Palko points to this report and writes: Putting aside my concerns with the “additional years of learning” metric (and I have a lot of them), I have the feeling that there’s something strange here or i’m missing something obvious. That jump from 3-year impact to 4-year seems excessive. The press release links to a […] The post Time-release pedagogy?? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
12:28 PM | Improving vision
Stem cell research paves the way for new eye treatments. Visually impaired people suffering from incurable eye diseases are eagerly awaiting new treatment methods. Many believe that stem cell research...

March 30, 2015

+
5:00 PM | Can anthropology defeat self-deception to build better apps?
Last September, I participated in the relaunch of Ignite NYC. These mini-presentations test your game by only allowing you five minutes and 20 slides to share your idea with audience. It’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
5:00 PM | Can anthropology defeat self-deception to build better apps?
Last September, I participated in the relaunch of Ignite NYC. These mini-presentations test your game by only allowing you five minutes and 20 slides to share your idea with audience. It’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
4:00 PM | George Carlin (2) vs. John Waters (1); Updike advances
The bard of the suburbs wins yesterday‘s bout with another fine turn of phrase, this time brought to us in comments by Ethan: “Drinking a toast to the visible world, his impending disappearance from it be damned.” Updike, from “My Father’s Tears.” I want to hear from someone who can write like that about things […] The post George Carlin (2) vs. John Waters (1); Updike advances appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
+
1:24 PM | How is ethics like logistic regression?
Ethics decisions, like statistical inferences, are informative only if they’re not too easy or too hard. For the full story, read the whole thing. The post How is ethics like logistic regression? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
3:42 AM | Is email one of the last private spaces online?
Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account. Then she used my email address to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:42 AM | Is email one of the last private spaces online?
Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account. Then she used my email address to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 29, 2015

+
6:30 PM | What do we learn about case studies from follow-up regression analysis?
Most multi-method research (MMR) studies with which I am familiar start with regression analysis (or, in recent years, QCA) and perform the case studies afterward. This is the order recommended by Lieberman in his nested analysis article which, in turn, … Continue reading →
+
4:00 PM | Friedrich Nietzsche (4) vs. John Updike; Austen advances
I chose yesterday‘s winner based on the oddest comment we’ve received so far in the competition, from AC: I’d love to see what Jane Austen (Austen’s early Regency dress style: http://sensibility.com/vintageimages/1800s/images/lacedress.jpg) thought of late Regency dresses (http://www.kittyprint.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/EveningDresses.jpg), which were basically the exact opposite sensibility. It’s an astonishingly quick reversal, from narrow and prim to a […]
+
1:25 PM | Regression: What’s it all about? [Bayesian and otherwise]
Regression: What’s it all about? Regression plays three different roles in applied statistics: 1. A specification of the conditional expectation of y given x; 2. A generative model of the world; 3. A method for adjusting data to generalize from sample to population, or to perform causal inferences. We could also include prediction, but I […] The post Regression: What’s it all about? [Bayesian and otherwise] appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]

March 28, 2015

+
4:00 PM | Stewart Lee vs. Jane Austen; Dick advances
Yesterday‘s deciding arguments came from Horselover himself. As quoted by Dalton: Any given man sees only a tiny portion of the total truth, and very often, in fact almost . . . perpetually, he deliberately deceives himself about that precious little fragment as well. And: We ourselves are information-rich; information enters us, is processed and […] The post Stewart Lee vs. Jane Austen; Dick advances appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:11 PM | The publication of one of my pet ideas: Simulation-efficient shortest probability intervals
In a paper to appear in Statistics and Computing, Ying Liu, Tian Zheng, and I write: Bayesian highest posterior density (HPD) intervals can be estimated directly from simulations via empirical shortest intervals. Unfortunately, these can be noisy (that is, have a high Monte Carlo error). We derive an optimal weighting strategy using bootstrap and quadratic […] The post The publication of one of my pet ideas: Simulation-efficient shortest probability intervals appeared first on […]

March 27, 2015

+
10:49 PM | The Benefits of Capturing your Everyday Experiences
SourceWhat would you rather do right now, write down the last conversation you had or watch a funny video guaranteed to make you laugh? What about a month from now – do you think you’d rather read about a random conversation you had last month or watch another funny video? These are some of the questions researchers asked in a recent set of studies exploring our tendency to underestimate how much pleasure we get out of rediscovering mundane experiences. Participants in these studies […]
+
4:00 PM | Mohandas Gandhi (1) vs. Philip K. Dick (2); Hobbes advances
All of yesterday‘s best comments were in favor of the political philosopher. Adam writes: With Hobbes, the seminar would be “nasty, brutish, and short.” And it would degenerate into a “war of all against all.” In other words, the perfect academic seminar. And Jonathan writes: Chris Rock would definitely be more entertaining. But the chance […] The post Mohandas Gandhi (1) vs. Philip K. Dick (2); Hobbes advances appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
+
1:07 PM | Imagining p
We’ve all had that experience of going purposefully from one hypothesis to another, only to get there and forget why we made the journey. Four years ago, researcher Daryl Bem and his colleagues stripped this effect down, showing that the simple act of obtaining a statistically significant comparison induces publication in a top journal. Now […] The post Imagining p appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
1234
110 Results