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Posts

April 06, 2014

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4:52 PM | The selling out diaries: Surprising sources of pressure
I’m a behavioral scientist, pretty lefty, and I currently do research for a major media corporation. I predicted before taking on this job that I would feel some pressure to drift from deeper questions about society towards “business school” questions — questions that are less about human behavior and more about consumer behavior. What I […]
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1:15 PM | An old discussion of food deserts
I happened to be reading an old comment thread from 2012 (follow the link from here) and came across this amusing exchange: Perhaps this is the paper Jonathan was talking about? Here’s more from the thread: Anyway, I don’t have anything to add right now, I just thought it was an interesting discussion.The post An old discussion of food deserts appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 05, 2014

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1:09 PM | Bizarre academic spam
I’ve been getting these sorts of emails every couple days lately: Respected Professor Gelman I am a senior undergraduate at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IIT Kanpur). I am currently in the 8th Semester of my Master of Science (Integrated) in Mathematics and Scientific Computing program. I went through some of your previous work and […]The post Bizarre academic spam appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 04, 2014

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7:27 PM | I was going to criticize this on blog but I’m just too tired of things like this. What’s really horrible is the news article which takes all this so seriously. My problem is not with people who run regressions and post them on the web—the more the merrier, I say—but with reputable news outlets whose editors should know better
A friend pointed me to this monstrosity. As an MIT grad, I’d like to think that Technology Review could do better. To elaborate a bit: A one-paragraph blurb would be fine to me, you can report that someone ran some regressions on the GSS and came up with an amusing hypothesis. That’s enough, then move […]The post I was going to criticize this on blog but I’m just too tired of things like this. What’s really horrible is the news article which takes all this so […]
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3:58 PM | Network Science and Expeditionary Economics
#NetworkScience In 2011, the United States Military Academy at West Point Social Sciences Department held its annual Senior Conference on Expeditionary Economics, which highlighted the military’s leading role in economic development, since post-conflict environments are initially too dangerous for U.S. … Continue reading →
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1:44 PM | The Notorious N.H.S.T. presents: Mo P-values Mo Problems
A recent discussion between commenters Question and Fernando captured one of the recurrent themes here from the past year. Question: The problem is simple, the researchers are disproving always false null hypotheses and taking this disproof as near proof that their theory is correct. Fernando: Whereas it is probably true that researchers misuse NHT, the […]The post The Notorious N.H.S.T. presents: Mo P-values Mo Problems appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
Editor's Pick
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1:17 PM | Why Do We Take Personality Tests?
I often get questions from friends and family that they would like answered in a post. This month, my post is inspired by a question from my grandmother. Kudos to my grandma for asking a question about a popular trend on the internet! […]

Gollwitzer, P. M. & Kirchhof, O. (1998). The Willful Pursuit of Identity, J. Heckhausen & C. S. Dweck (Eds.), Life-span perspectives on motivation and control., 389-423. Other: Link

Swann, W. B. (2012). Self-verification theory, In P. Van Lang, A. Kruglanski, & E.T. Higgins (Eds.) Handbook of Theories of Social Psychology,, 23-42. Other: Link

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11:48 AM | Russia, a patchwork of states, fears being torn apart
“Ukraine is not only important for Russia – it is historically a constitutive part of Russia.” Russia’s behaviour in Ukraine and the Caucasus demonstrates its fears about being dismantled and...
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4:21 AM | Pelaajabarometri 2013: Mobiilipelaamisen nousu
Pelaajabarometrissa uutta tietoa pelaamisen muutossuunnista Nyt julkaistu, vuoden 2013 aikana kerättyä aineistoa raportoiva uusin Pelaajabarometri kertoo pelaamisen suosion kokonaisuudessaan pysyneen ennallaan. Jos huomioidaan kaikki erilaiset pelimuodot ja satunnainenkin pelaaminen lähes jokainen suomalainen pelaa ainakin jotakin. Aktiivisia, vähintään kerran kuukaudessa jotain … Continue reading →
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12:56 AM | Assisted Suicide Comes to "Girls"
On the season finale of HBO’s “Girls” last month, an ailing photographer named Beadie, played by the inimitable Louise Lasser in a wheelchair, asks Jessa to help her die. It was daring of Lena Dunham, the show’s writer and creator, to introduce this particular plot twist, since assisted suicide is one of the subjects that American television shows steadily avoid.read more

April 03, 2014

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1:28 PM | As the boldest experiment in journalism history, you admit you made a mistake
The pre-NYT David Brooks liked to make fun of the NYT. Here’s one from 1997: I’m not sure I’d like to be one of the people featured on the New York Times wedding page, but I know I’d like to be the father of one of them. Imagine how happy Stanley J. Kogan must have […]The post As the boldest experiment in journalism history, you admit you made a mistake appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 02, 2014

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9:11 PM | The Psychology of Economic Inequality: A Collection
Today I wrote an op-ed piece for livescience about economic inequality. Read the piece here. In it, I argue that though economic inequality is a complex social and political issue, it may be explained, at least in part, in terms of the basic psychological motivations of individuals.Anyway, I hope you'll check out the piece and send me comments via twitter (@mwkraus). If you'd like to read more about this area of research, below I have collected four past PYM pieces on the topic.Read More->
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5:57 PM | The Missing Link that Wasn’t
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:57 PM | The Missing Link that Wasn’t
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:30 PM | Free Gamification of Human Resources Webinar Coming April 15
On April 15 at 1PM EDT, I will be giving a webinar on gamification for the Human Capital Institute.  If you’re interested in what science says about how gamification and videogames can improve HR processes, you’ll want to be there.  Registration is free, but you’ll need to sign up for a free account on the […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:Is I/O Psychology Ruining Human Resources?Gamification, Social Media, Mobile, and MTurk SIOP 2014 TNTLab […]
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1:14 PM | Am I too negative?
For background, you can start by reading my recent article, Is It Possible to Be an Ethicist Without Being Mean to People? and then a blog post, Quality over Quantity, by John Cook, who writes: At one point [Ed] Tufte spoke more generally and more personally about pursuing quality over quantity. He said most papers […]The post Am I too negative? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 01, 2014

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4:12 PM | Cadet Research Accomplishments Recognized
#NetworkScience NSC Cadets Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowships The Network Science Center had two cadet researchers awarded the prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship: Cadet Damon Paulo (EECS/MATH) and Cadet Geoffrey Moores (EECS/PHYSICS). Additionally, Cadet Joseph Hannigan (EECS) was given an … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Association for Psychological Science announces a new journal
The Association for Psychological Science, the leading organization of research psychologists, announced a long-awaited new journal, Speculations on Psychological Science. From the official APS press release: Speculations on Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association for Psychological Science, will publish cutting-edge research articles, short reports, and research reports spanning the entire spectrum of the […]The post Association for Psychological Science announces […]

March 31, 2014

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2:54 PM | The most-cited statistics papers ever
Robert Grant has a list. I’ll just give the ones with more than 10,000 Google Scholar cites: Cox (1972) Regression and life tables: 35,512 citations. Dempster, Laird, Rubin (1977) Maximum likelihood from incomplete data via the EM algorithm: 34,988 Bland & Altman (1986) Statistical methods for assessing agreement between two methods of clinical measurement: 27,181 […]The post The most-cited statistics papers ever appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: The most-cited statistics papers ever Tues: American Psychological Society announces a new journal Wed: Am I too negative? Thurs: As the boldest experiment in journalism history, you admit you made a mistake Fri: The Notorious N.H.S.T. presents: Mo P-values Mo Problems Sat: Bizarre academic spam Sun: An old discussion of food desertsThe post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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11:52 AM | Dutch Men are not Nordic Men
There are reasons to appreciate Hanna Rosin’s ‘The End of Men’: it was pleasantly written, contains various entertaining anecdotes, and holds an attractive promise of increased gender equality – although, to trumpet the demise of men (to paraphrase page 285) might be somewhat less desirable. It would have made for a relevant book, were it… Continue Reading

Philip Cohen (2013). The “End of Men” Is Not True: What Is Not and What Might Be on the Road Toward Gender Equality, BOSTON UNIVERSITY LAW REVIEW, 1159-1184. Other: Link

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10:19 AM | Just gave a talk
I just gave a talk in Milan. Actually I was sitting at my desk, it was a g+ hangout which was a bit more convenient for me. The audience was a bunch of astronomers so I figured they could handle a satellite link. . . . Anyway, the talk didn’t go so well. Two reasons: […]The post Just gave a talk appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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7:17 AM | Call for Papers: Fafnir 3/2014
Call for Papers: Fafnir 3/2014 Fafnir – Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research invites authors to submit papers for the upcoming edition 3/2014. Fafnir – Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research is a new, peer-reviewed academic … Continue reading →
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6:52 AM | Fooling Ourselves: The Everyday role of Ritual
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:52 AM | Fooling Ourselves: The Everyday role of Ritual
April Fools’ Day is not unique to Western cultures. People all over the world and all throughout history have celebrated the coming of Spring with festivals of deception and lightheartedness.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 30, 2014

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1:41 PM | Adjudicating between alternative interpretations of a statistical interaction?
Jacob Felson writes: Say we have a statistically significant interaction in non-experimental data between two continuous predictors, X and Z and it is unclear which variable is primarily a cause and which variable is primarily a moderator. One person might find it more plausible to think of X as a cause and Z as a […]The post Adjudicating between alternative interpretations of a statistical interaction? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

March 29, 2014

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1:14 PM | References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling
A student writes: I am new to Bayesian methods. While I am reading your book, I have some questions for you. I am interested in doing Bayesian hierarchical (multi-level) linear regression (e.g., random-intercept model) and Bayesian structural equation modeling (SEM)—for causality. Do you happen to know if I could find some articles, where authors could […]The post References (with code) for Bayesian hierarchical (multilevel) modeling and structural equation modeling appeared first […]
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12:15 PM | Mourning Online
Trend stories in The New York Times Sunday Styles section have plenty of problems, but the one last weekend about how this generation of young people is changing how they view death and how they mourn, had one great benefit: it linked to the web site Modern Loss. What a web site.read more
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10:44 AM | ¿Son contagiosos los pensamientos depresivos?
Las emociones pueden ser tan contagiosas como una gripe. Basta una breve interacción con una persona, tal vez una aparentemente intrascendente conversación de ascensor, para que nos inocule el virus […]

Haeffel, GJ & Hames, JL (2014). Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression Can Be Contagious, Clinical Psychological Science, 2 75-85. DOI:

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10:19 AM | I agree with this comment
The anonymous commenter puts it well: The problem is simple, the researchers are disproving always false null hypotheses and taking this disproof as near proof that their theory is correct.The post I agree with this comment appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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