Posts

December 11, 2014

+
10:00 AM | Tech Hub Sustainability in Africa #HubSustainability
Researcher Dan Evans continued to participate in a series of Google Hangouts partnering with AfriLabs and AfriHive discussing tech hub sustainability in Sub-Saharan Africa. The most recent occurred on 5 December. The main focus of these discussions have been the … Continue reading →
+
7:53 AM | Professor Tuula Tamminen appointed to EC health panel
Child psychiatry professor Tuula Tamminen from the University of Tampere has been appointed to the Scientific Panel for Health of the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 research innovation programme. She is...

December 10, 2014

+
10:06 PM | Stan at NIPS 2014
For those in Montreal a few of the Stan developers will giving talks at the NIPS workshops this week.  On Saturday at 9 AM I’ll be talking about the theoretical foundations of Hamiltonian Monte Carlo at the Riemannian Geometry workshop (http://www.riemanniangeometry2014.eu) while Dan will be talking about Stan at the Software Engineering workshop (https://sites.google.com/site/software4ml/) Saturday […] The post Stan at NIPS 2014 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
+
2:08 PM | The inclination to deny all variation
One thing we’ve been discussing a lot lately is the discomfort many people—many researchers—feel about uncertainty. This was particularly notable in the reaction of psychologists Jessica Tracy and Alec Beall to our “garden of forking paths” paper, but really we see it all over: people find some pattern in their data and they don’t even […] The post The inclination to deny all variation appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
+
11:25 AM | Pelitutkimuksen vuosikirja 2014
Tiedoksi, runsaasti uutta pelitutkimustietoa on jälleen ilmaiseksi tarjolla: Pelitutkimuksen kenttä laajenee — uusi Pelitutkimuksen vuosikirja ilmestynyt Pelitutkimuksen vuosikirja 2014 on ilmestynyt sähköisenä osoitteessa http://www.pelitutkimus.fi/vuosikirja-2014 Vuosikirjassa tarkastellaan niin pelaamisen historiaa, nykytilannetta kuin tulevaisuuttakin. Pelitutkimuksen vuosikirja on vertaisarvioitu, avoin tiedejulkaisu.Pelitutkimus on sekä … […]
+
2:36 AM | Ditch Your Tired New Year’s Resolutions
claimtoken-5490e69504d81 We all have good intentions when we make New Year’s resolutions, but fully 88 percent of us fail to achieve them. That’s because in our enthusiasm to make positive changes, we take on too much. We simply don’t have enough time, energy, and mental bandwidth to keep up with multiple resolutions in the midst […] The post Ditch Your Tired New Year’s Resolutions appeared first on Wiley Asia Blog.

December 09, 2014

+
11:39 PM | Don’t believe everything you read in the (scientific) papers
A journalist writes in with a question: This study on [sexy topic] is getting a lot of attention, and I wanted to see if you had a few minutes to look it over for me . . . Basically, I am somewhat skeptical of [sexy subject area] explanations of complex behavior, and in this case […] The post Don’t believe everything you read in the (scientific) papers appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
8:03 PM | Bayesian Cognitive Modeling Models Ported to Stan
Hats off for Martin Šmíra, who has finished porting the models from Michael Lee and Eric-Jan Wagenmakers’ book Bayesian Cognitive Modeling  to Stan. Here they are: Bayesian Cognitive Modeling: Stan Example Models Martin managed to port 54 of the 57 models in the book and verified that the Stan code got the same answers as […] The post Bayesian Cognitive Modeling Models Ported to Stan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
2:43 PM | Buggy-whip update
On 12 Aug I sent the following message to Michael Link, president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research.  (I could not find Link’s email on the AAPOR webpage but I did some googling and found an email address for him at nielsen.com.): Dear Dr. Link:A colleague pointed me to a statement released under your […] The post Buggy-whip update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
4:23 AM | DiGRA 2016
Spreading the word: The School of Arts, Media and Computer Games at Abertay University is pleased to announce that it will be hosting the 2016 International DiGRA Conference in Dundee, Scotland, tentatively scheduled for August 3 – 6, 2016. Abertay University is the … Continue reading →

December 08, 2014

+
8:11 PM | Time Capsule
Continuing to troubleshoot our persistent home networking problems: while we have got a high pile of various routers, last several years the heart of the network has been Asus RT-N56U dual-band model, which was awarded as the fastest router available … Continue reading →
+
4:12 PM | Steven Pinker on writing: Where I agree and where I disagree
Linguist and public intellectual Steven Pinker recently published an article, “Why Academics Stink at Writing.” That’s a topic that interests me! Like Pinker, I’ve done a lot of writing, both for technical and general audiences. Unlike Pinker, I have not done research on linguistics, but I’ll do my best to comment based on my own […] The post Steven Pinker on writing: Where I agree and where I disagree appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
+
2:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: Steven Pinker on writing: Where I agree and where I disagree Tues: Buggy-whip update Wed: The inclination to deny all variation Thurs: The Fallacy of Placing Confidence in Confidence Intervals Fri: Saying things that are out of place Sat: Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t . . . We’re brothers of the same mind, unblind Sun: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
9:30 AM | Newsblast Volume 4 Issue 12
#NetworkScience In the current issue of the Network Science Center Newsblast Dr. Jocelyn Bell discusses an interdisciplinary research project she is working on involving pulling meaning from machine read text using significant words and N-grams.  To learn more read the article, ‘Graphs, Maps, … Continue reading →
+
4:06 AM | Who should write the new NYT chess column?
Matt Gaffney gives these “three essential characteristics” for writing “a relevant, interesting weekly chess column” in 2014: 1. It must be written by someone who is deeply involved in the chess world. Summaries of information that is already available online won’t cut it anymore. And since newspapers can’t afford to send columnists around the world […] The post Who should write the new NYT chess column? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]

December 07, 2014

+
2:57 PM | Subtleties with measurement-error models for the evaluation of wacky claims
Paul Pudaite writes: In the latest Journal of the American Statistical Association (September 2014, Vol. 109 No. 507), Andrew Harvey and Alessandra Luati published a paper [preprint here] — “Filtering With Heavy Tails” — featuring the phenomenon you had asked about (“…(non-Gaussian) models for which, as y gets larger, E(x|y) can actually go back toward […] The post Subtleties with measurement-error models for the evaluation of wacky claims appeared […]

December 06, 2014

+
6:52 PM | Are Old People Really Happier?
Just yesterday morning New York Times columnist David Brooks wrote a column about the U-shaped curve of happiness called "Why Elders Smile." It is currently #1 on the most-emailed list at the Times. He says old people "are spared some of the burden of thinking about the future." Um, why is this a good thing, exactly?read more
+
2:54 PM | Plaig: it’s not about the copying, it’s about the lack of attribution
I think most of you understand this one already but there still seems to be some confusion on how plagiarism works, so here goes . . . Basbøll links to a twitter feed by Adam Kotsko, a scholar of religion who’s written about the work of controversial philosopher Slavoj Zizek. Kotsko appears to be annoyed […] The post Plaig: it’s not about the copying, it’s about the lack of attribution appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

December 05, 2014

+
2:51 PM | The persistence of the “schools are failing” story line
I happened to come across a post from 2011 about some work of Roland Fryer, a prominent economist who works in education research. In an article, Fryer made the offhand remark that “test scores have been largely constant over the past thirty years,” a claim that was completely contradicted by one of the graphs in […] The post The persistence of the “schools are failing” story line appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:58 PM | Does It Matter?
New York City Police suspected Eric Garner of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes on a Staten Island sidewalk. In an attempt to place him under arrest, Officer Daniel Pantaleo put Garner in what NYPD Chief Bill Bratton describes as a chokehold, which is against NYPD policy. Garner was pronounced dead about an hour later at a hospital. Garner according to his friends, had several health issues: diabetes, sleep apnea, and asthma so severe that he had to quit his job as... Read more
+
1:19 PM | Sailing west down the Panama Canal will get you into which ocean?
The Atlantic. And when you get to the Pacific, and sail up to L.A., you can drive west toward Reno. WHile we’re at it, there is also a sliver of the world where the timezones go backward. Thank you geopolitics. Photo from Wikipedia.

December 04, 2014

+
2:25 PM | Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing
Lorin H. writes: One big question in the world of software engineering is: how much variation is there in productivity across programmers? (If you google for “10x programmer” you’ll see lots of hits). Let’s say I wanted to explore this research question with a simple study. Choose a set of participants at random from a […] The post Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, […]

December 03, 2014

+
9:53 PM | How To Craft An Empirically-Supported Marriage.
Many of you have likely noticed that I have been on an extended hiatus from blogging due to an especially crazy 2014, filled with lots of big events and life changes that have kept me exceptionally... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
2:00 PM | If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies
My article “Experimental reasoning in social science” begins as follows: As a statistician, I was trained to think of randomized experimentation as representing the gold standard of knowledge in the social sciences, and, despite having seen occasional arguments to the contrary, I still hold that view, expressed pithily by Box, Hunter, and Hunter (1978) that […] The post If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies appeared first on […]
+
7:01 AM | New articles in Games and Culture
There are again some interesting, new research articles published in the Online First area of Games and Culture journal: Shallow Gamification: Testing Psychological Effects of Framing an Activity as a Game Andreas Lieberoth   The Role of Visual Design in … Continue reading →

December 02, 2014

+
8:40 PM | Conceptual Foundations of Language Science publishes its first book
Two months ago we started a new book series with the innovative open access publisher Language Science Press: Conceptual Foundations of Language Science. We’re proud to announce that the series published its first book this week. The book, Natural causes of language is … Continue reading →
+
2:43 PM | How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write.
It all started when I was reading Chris Blattman’s blog and noticed this: One of the most provocative and interesting field experiments I [Blattman] have seen in this year: Poor people often do not make investments, even when returns are high. One possible explanation is that they have low aspirations and form mental models of […] The post How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
+
3:52 AM | Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning
[This post is by Aki] This is my first blog posting. Arthur Poropat at Griffith University has a great posting Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning about two recent studies which came to the same conclusion: university students evaluate their teachers more positively when they learn less. My favorite part is That is why many […] The post Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning appeared first on Statistical Modeling, […]

December 01, 2014

+
5:37 PM | Stan hack session at Columbia on Saturday
[this post is by Daniel] For those of you in NYC this Saturday, we’re having a Stan hack session from 11 am – 5 pm. A lot of the Stan developers will be around. It’s free, but registration required. See link below. Bring a laptop, some data, and a model you want to fit. Or […] The post Stan hack session at Columbia on Saturday appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
4:50 PM | Quick tips on giving research presentations
Hi, I’m writing this so I can refer to it when covering “giving a presentation” in my statistical communication class. The general idea is for me to spend less time in class talking and more time helping out students with their ideas. So, if I have any general advice on presentations, let me give it […] The post Quick tips on giving research presentations appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
123
90 Results