Posts

September 19, 2014

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5:26 PM | Why did Pirates Fly the Jolly Roger?
The “pirate brand” has long been tied to the skull and crossbones—the Jolly Roger—as a symbol of terror on the high seas. The Times hails the ominous design as a magnificent exercise in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:26 PM | Why did Pirates Fly the Jolly Roger?
The “pirate brand” has long been tied to the skull and crossbones—the Jolly Roger—as a symbol of terror on the high seas. The Times hails the ominous design as a magnificent exercise in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:02 PM | What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol: They all made foolish, embarrassing errors that would never have happened had they been using R Markdown
Rachel Cunliffe shares this delight: Had the CNN team used an integrated statistical analysis and display system such as R Markdown, nobody would’ve needed to type in the numbers by hand, and the above embarrassment never would’ve occurred. And CNN should be embarrassed about this: it’s much worse than a simple typo, as it indicates […] The post What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol: They all made foolish, embarrassing […]

September 18, 2014

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5:30 PM | Shamer shaming
This post is by Phil Price. I can’t recall when I first saw “shaming” used in its currently popular sense. I remember noting “slut shaming” and “fat shaming” but did they first become popular two years ago? Three? At any rate, “shaming” is now everywhere…and evidently it’s a very bad thing. When I first saw […] The post Shamer shaming appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:59 PM | Palko’s on a roll
I just wanted to interrupt our scheduled stream of posts to link to a bunch of recent material from Mark Palko: At least we can all agree that ad hominem and overly general attacks are bad: A savvy critique of the way in which opposition of any sort can be dismissed as “ad hominem” attacks. […] The post Palko’s on a roll appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

September 17, 2014

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1:35 PM | What do you do to visualize uncertainty?
Howard Wainer writes: What do you do to visualize uncertainty? Do you only use static methods (e.g. error bounds)? Or do you also make use of dynamic means (e.g. have the display vary over time proportional to the error, so you don’t know exactly where the top of the bar is, since it moves while […] The post What do you do to visualize uncertainty? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:30 PM | Sortable I/O Psychology Ph.D. Program Rankings
Having written my grad school series, one of the most common questions I get is, “Which graduate programs should I apply to?” As I’ve explained on this blog, that’s a complicated question. You should evaluate which schools offer what you want as a student. Unfortunately, SIOP does not make it easy to directly compare such information […]The post Sortable I/O Psychology Ph.D. Program Rankings appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:How […]
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10:30 AM | Von Humboldt on depiction in speech
Where moderation is not utterly overstepped, the wealth of sound in languages can be compared to coloration in painting. The impression of both evokes a similar feeling; and even thought reacts differently if, like a mere outline, it emerges in … Continue reading →

September 16, 2014

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4:28 PM | Fafnir: third issue is out
Spread the word: We are proud to present the third issue of Fafnir – Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research! The issue can be read at http://journal.finfar.org. Fafnir is a new, peer-reviewed academic journal which is published in … Continue reading →
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1:34 PM | They know my email but they don’t know me
This came (unsolicited) in the inbox today (actually, two months ago; we’re on a delay, as you’re probably aware), subject line “From PWC – animations of CEO opinions for 2014″: Good afternoon, I wanted to see if the data my colleague David sent to you was of any interest. I have attached here additional animated […] The post They know my email but they don’t know me appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

September 15, 2014

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3:22 PM | More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers
In a news article regarding difficulties in using panel surveys to measure the unemployment rate, David Leonhardt writes: The main factor is technology. It’s a major cause of today’s response-rate problems – but it’s also the solution. For decades, survey research has revolved around the telephone, and it’s worked very well. But Americans’ relationship with […] The post More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers appeared first on Statistical […]
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers Tues: They know my email but they don’t know me Wed: What do you do to visualize uncertainty? Thurs: Sokal: “science is not merely a bag of clever tricks . . . Rather, the natural sciences are nothing more or less than one particular application — albeit […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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6:34 AM | China’s Little Europe
Theoretically, any country that harbors a substantial amount of foreign immigrants is going to develop what sociologists call ethnic enclaves, or physical locales in which the ethnic and cultural background […]

September 14, 2014

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10:40 PM | Obama’s Message to West Africans on the Ebola Outbreak
Last week, the State Department performed a small but smart gesture towards countering the continued outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa by releasing a video featuring President Barack Obama speaking to the people of Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Nigeria. Educating the millions of people in this region on the facts of this massive outbreak and […]The post Obama’s Message to West Africans on the Ebola Outbreak appeared first on Body Horrors.
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1:30 PM | Six quotes from Kaiser Fung
You may think you have all of the data. You don’t. One of the biggest myth of Big Data is that data alone produce complete answers. Their “data” have done no arguing; it is the humans who are making this claim. Before getting into the methodological issues, one needs to ask the most basic question. […] The post Six quotes from Kaiser Fung appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

September 13, 2014

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1:04 PM | He just ordered a translation from Diederik Stapel
Fernando Martel Garcia writes: So I am applying for a DC driver’s license and needed a translation of my Spanish license to show to the DMV. I go to http://www.onehourtranslation.com/ and as I prepare to pay I see a familiar face in the bottom banner: It appears Stapel is one of their “over 15,000 dedicated […] The post He just ordered a translation from Diederik Stapel appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

September 12, 2014

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7:33 PM | Impressions from the APSA 2014, or: QCA under fire?
If this was a blog post about the #APSA2014, I would have to write about Friday night’s fire emergency at the Marriott (i.e., #APSAonfire) as the non-academic event that left a definite imprint (and affected me as one of the … Continue reading →
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2:23 PM | What is the purpose of a poem?
OK, let’s take a break from blogging about economics. OK, I haven’t actually been blogging so much about econ lately, but it just happens that I’m writing this on 19 July, a day after poking a stick into the hornet’s nest by posting “Differences between econometrics and statistics: From varying treatment effects to utilities, economists […] The post What is the purpose of a poem? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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11:34 AM | Mindfulness: la vida en el bosque de la mente
El mindfulness o meditación de consciencia plena ofrece una vía para regular nuestras emociones y pensamientos, con efectos beneficiosos en términos de aumento del bienestar subjetivo y reducción de síntomas […]
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10:21 AM | Family relationships are changed – but not fixed – by having a child
Families transition from pregnancy to parenthood in different ways. Having a child has an impact on marital and family relationships, but it does not change the basic family dynamics. New...
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1:25 AM | mysterious shiny things
(Disclaimer: I’m new to Shiny, and blog posts, but I know something about geography.)  In the Shiny gallery, take a look at 2001 versus 2002. Something funny happens to Switzerland (and other European countries), in terms of the legend, it moves from Europe to the Middle East. Also, the legend color scheme switches.     […] The post mysterious shiny things appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

September 11, 2014

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9:45 PM | Bayesian Cognitive Modeling  Examples Ported to Stan
There’s a new intro to Bayes in town. Michael Lee and Eric-Jan Wagenmaker. 2014. Bayesian Cognitive Modeling: A Practical Course. Cambridge Uni. Press. This book’s a wonderful introduction to applied Bayesian modeling. But don’t take my word for it — you can download and read the first two parts of the book (hundreds of pages […] The post Bayesian Cognitive Modeling  Examples Ported to Stan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
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1:22 PM | One-tailed or two-tailed
This image of a two-tailed lizard (from here, I can’t find the name of the person who took the picture) never fails to amuse me. But let us get to the question at hand . . . Richard Rasiej writes: I’m currently teaching a summer session course in Elementary Statistics. The text that I was […] The post One-tailed or two-tailed appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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10:57 AM | FICAM director Tuula Heinonen awarded international science prize for non-animal testing methods
Docent Tuula Heinonen, the director of FICAM, has received the annual Björn Ekwall Memorial Award for her research. Heinonen develops tissue models based on human cells and promotes the replacement...
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12:29 AM | Evolution’s Surprise Bag: The African Naked Mole Rat
This beauty wouldn’t win any pageants, but it is a fascinating animal. The African naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber), whose hairless, tubular, wrinkled body makes it appear a bit like a tiny walrus lives in underground burrows in very dry areas of East Africa (Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia). Neither Mole nor Rat Eduard Rüppell, a German naturalist of the 19th century, who first documented a naked mole rat, assumed from its unprepossessing appearance that it was a diseased or […]

September 10, 2014

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1:24 PM | “It’s as if you went into a bathroom in a bar and saw a guy pissing on his shoes, and instead of thinking he has some problem with his aim, you suppose he has a positive utility for getting his shoes wet”
The notion of a geocentric universe has come under criticism from Copernican astronomy. . . . A couple months ago in a discussion of differences between econometrics and statistics, I alluded to the well-known fact that everyday uncertainty aversion can’t be explained by a declining marginal utility of money. What really bothers me—it’s been bothering […] The post “It’s as if you went into a bathroom in a bar and saw a guy pissing on his shoes, and instead […]
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8:56 AM | Malinowski on observing ‘performance’
There is no doubt, from all points of sociological, or psychological analysis, and in any question of theory, the manner and type of behaviour observed in the performance of an act is of the highest importance. Indeed behaviour is a … Continue reading →

September 09, 2014

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3:08 PM | Neural Correlates of Gender Differences in Reputation Building
Gender differences in reputation building and cooperative behavior are investigated in our last neuroeconomic study just published on PLoS One.Garbarini F, Boero R, D'Agata F, Bravo G, Mosso C, et al. (2014) Neural Correlates of Gender Differences in Reputation Building. PLoS ONE 9(9): e106285. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106285AbstractGender differences in cooperative choices and their neural correlates were investigated in a situation where reputation represented a crucial issue. Males and […]
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1:49 PM | Suspiciously vague graph purporting to show “percentage of slaves or serfs in the world”
Phillip Middleton sent this along, it’s from Peter Diamandis, who is best known for his X Prize, the “global leader in the creation of incentivized prize competitions.” Diamandis wrote: Phillip Middleton, Is technology making you work harder? Or giving you more time off? Seriously, it feels like it’s enabling me to work around the clock! […] The post Suspiciously vague graph purporting to show “percentage of slaves or serfs in the world” appeared first […]
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11:46 AM | Professor Pertti Alasuutari from UTA to the board of the Academy of Finland
The Government of Finland has appointed a new board for the Academy of Finland. The new Board’s term of office will last until the end of 2018. The Board will...
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