Posts

May 03, 2015

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1:10 PM | Forget about pdf: this looks much better, it makes all my own papers look like kids’ crayon drawings by comparison.
Mark Palko points me to this webpage which presents a recent research paper by Joanna Shepherd and Michael Kang. I have no comment on the research—I haven’t had a chance to read the paper—but I wanted to express how impressed I was about the presentation. It starts with a dedicated url just for this paper […] The post Forget about pdf: this looks much better, it makes all my own papers look like kids’ crayon drawings by comparison. appeared first on Statistical […]

May 02, 2015

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1:10 PM | Which of these classes should he take?
Jake Humphries writes: I for many years wanted to pursue medicine but after recently completing a master of public health, I caught the statistics bug. I need to complete the usual minimum prerequisites for graduate study in statistics (calculus through multivariable calculus plus linear algebra) but want to take additional math courses as highly competitive […] The post Which of these classes should he take? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

May 01, 2015

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2:55 PM | Why should we take a dimensional approach to studying developmental disorders?
Developmental disorders like attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), language, learning and movement disorders are relatively common, more common then we might think. Furthermore, these disorders have a considerable impact upon the daily lives of those who struggle with them. Because some of these disorders are more apparent in … Continue reading Why should we take a dimensional approach to studying developmental […]
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1:51 PM | “The general problem I have with noninformatively-derived Bayesian probabilities is that they tend to be too strong.”
We interrupt our usual programming of mockery of buffoons to discuss a bit of statistical theory . . . Continuing from yesterday‘s quotation of my 2012 article in Epidemiology: Like many Bayesians, I have often represented classical confidence intervals as posterior probability intervals and interpreted one-sided p-values as the posterior probability of a positive effect. […] The post “The general problem I have with noninformatively-derived Bayesian probabilities is that […]
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2:20 AM | Quackery & Poison: A Ballsy Procedure
It seems to have started, as many things medicinal do, with Hippocrates. We may not understand precisely why, some 2000 years ago, the great Greek physician chose to insert the bladder of a pig into a patient’s chest and then inflate this porcine balloon. But it may have had something to do with tuberculosis and with the phenomenon of “pulmonary collapse,” which has had a surprisingly long and fruitful run in the annals of medical history. The tuberculosis bacterium has […]

April 30, 2015

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7:45 PM | There are 6 ways to get rejected from PLOS: (1) theft, (2) sexual harassment, (3) running an experiment without a control group, (4) keeping a gambling addict away from the casino, (5) chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings, and (6) having no male co-authors
This story is pretty horrifying/funny. But the strangest thing was this part: [The author] and her colleague have appealed to the unnamed journal, which belongs to the PLoS family . . . I thought PLOS published just about everything! This is not a slam on PLOS. Arxiv publishes everything too, and Arxiv is great. The […] The post There are 6 ways to get rejected from PLOS: (1) theft, (2) sexual harassment, (3) running an experiment without a control group, (4) keeping a gambling addict […]
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1:48 PM | Good, mediocre, and bad p-values
From my 2012 article in Epidemiology: In theory the p-value is a continuous measure of evidence, but in practice it is typically trichotomized approximately into strong evidence, weak evidence, and no evidence (these can also be labeled highly significant, marginally significant, and not statistically significant at conventional levels), with cutoffs roughly at p=0.01 and 0.10. […] The post Good, mediocre, and bad p-values appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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1:00 PM | An Ode to a Grandma
The decision to operate on a 93-year-old, against her wishes, has a happy ending: she recovers, and has 9 more years that turn out to be the best years of her life. It's debatable, though, whether it would have been wrong to let her die when she wanted to.

April 29, 2015

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1:45 PM | Carl Morris: Man Out of Time [reflections on empirical Bayes]
I wrote the following for the occasion of his recent retirement party but I thought these thoughts might of general interest: When Carl Morris came to our department in 1989, I and my fellow students were so excited. We all took his class. The funny thing is, though, the late 1980s might well have been […] The post Carl Morris: Man Out of Time [reflections on empirical Bayes] appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:30 PM | SIOP 2015: Live Blog Archive
The 2015 Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology conference has concluded, and I am honestly still reeling a bit! Below is an archive of my Twitter activity during the conference (much like I did last year), which includes a variety of both between- and mid-session tweets.  I don’t know if this is useful to anyone but me, but I’ll […]The post SIOP 2015: Live Blog Archive appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:SIOP 2012: Day 2 […]
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9:57 AM | Programme for STS Workshop ‘On Being the Right Size: Science, Technology and Scale’
(Disclaimer: I have no role in this conference other than sitting at the back. But thought people might share my excitement about the programme). 10.30 Jon Agar, Jean-Baptiste Gouyon, Simon Werrett (STS, UCL) ‘Introduction: Science, technology and scale’   11.00 … Continue reading →

April 28, 2015

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1:05 PM | What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks?
As I wrote a couple years ago: Statistics does not require randomness. The three essential elements of statistics are measurement, comparison, and variation. Randomness is one way to supply variation, and it’s one way to model variation, but it’s not necessary. Nor is it necessary to have “true” randomness (of the dice-throwing or urn-sampling variety) […] The post What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks? appeared […]

April 27, 2015

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7:44 PM | El mejor lugar para tocar el alma humana
La experiencia polar ofrece una ocasión única para poner a prueba no sólo los límites físicos del ser humano, sino también su capacidad de afrontar numerosos desafíos emocionales e interpersonales, […]
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2:35 PM | Eccentric mathematician
I just read this charming article by Lee Wilkinson’s brother on a mathematician named Yitang Zhang. Zhang recently gained some fame after recently proving a difficult theorem, and he seems to be a quite unusual, but likable, guy. What I liked about Wilkinson’s article is how it captured Zhang’s eccentricities with affection but without condescension. […] The post Eccentric mathematician appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: Eccentric mathematician Tues: What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks? Wed: Carl Morris: Man Out of Time [reflections on empirical Bayes] Thurs: “The general problem I have with noninformatively-derived Bayesian probabilities is that they tend to be too strong.” Fri: Good, mediocre, and bad p-values Sat: Which of these […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 26, 2015

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7:21 PM | Economic game theory’s “folk theorem” is not empirically relevant
I study a lot of game dynamics: how people learn as they make the same socially-inflected decision over and over. A branch of my career has been devoted to finding out that people do neat unexpected things that are totally unpredicted by established models. Like in most things, anything close to opposition to this work […]
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1:37 PM | This year’s Atlantic Causal Inference Conference: 20-21 May
Dylan Small writes: The conference will take place May 20-21 (with a short course on May 19th) and the web site for the conference is here. The deadline for submitting a poster title for the poster session is this Friday. Junior researchers (graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and assistant professors) whose poster demonstrates exceptional research will […] The post This year’s Atlantic Causal Inference Conference: 20-21 May appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]

April 25, 2015

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1:36 PM | Statistical analysis on a dataset that consists of a population
This is an oldie but a goodie. Donna Towns writes: I am wondering if you could help me solve an ongoing debate? My colleagues and I are discussing (disagreeing) on the ability of a researcher to analyze information on a population. My colleagues are sure that a researcher is unable to perform statistical analysis on […] The post Statistical analysis on a dataset that consists of a population appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

April 24, 2015

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6:07 PM | Newsblast Volume 5 Issue 4
#NetworkScience In the current issue of the Network Science Center’s Newsblast Luke Gerdes discusses the possible significance of correlations between youth gangs and social media in ‘Exploring Crime and Social Media’. To learn more about this project, click here and read the full article … Continue reading →
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1:13 PM | Statistical significance, practical significance, and interactions
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: interaction is one of the key underrated topics in statistics. I thought about this today (OK, a couple months ago, what with our delay) when reading a post by Dan Kopf on the exaggeration of small truths. Or, to put it another way, statistically significant but […] The post Statistical significance, practical significance, and interactions appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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9:40 AM | Pelien vetovoimasta ja “koukuttavuudesta”
[My views on games’ holding power and “addictiveness”.] Hiljattain toimittaja kyseli minulta sähköpostitse näkemyksiä siitä, mikä tekee Angry Birdsin kaltaisesta mobiilipelistä “koukuttavan” ja ovatko tällaiset pelit kenties addiktiivisempia (eli riippuvuutta aiheuttavia) verrattuna perinteisiin tietokonepeleihin. Hesarissa julkaistu juttu oli lopulta supistunut … Continue reading →
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9:16 AM | SciFest, SciEdu
[I will be talking about play, games and new technology in the context of learning in Joensuu] Matkustan tänään Joensuuhun, missä on laaja SciFest 2015-tapahtuma 23.-25.4. Itse puhun tapahtuman yhteydessä toteutettavassa SciEdu-seminaarissa la klo 13 otsikolla “Leikkiä, peliä ja uutta … Continue reading →
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1:01 AM | Culture Bites: The Changing Nature of the Food Truck Industry
What do you normally have for lunch? Leftovers? A sandwich? Do you bring it from home or do you buy it from a local eatery? In New York City, a sandwich from a deli (with a pickle and a bag of chips)... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:01 AM | Culture Bites: The Changing Nature of the Food Truck Industry
What do you normally have for lunch? Leftovers? A sandwich? Do you bring it from home or do you buy it from a local eatery? In New York City, a sandwich from a deli (with a pickle and a bag of chips)... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

April 23, 2015

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1:26 PM | Political Attitudes in Social Environments
Jose Duarte, Jarret Crawford, Charlotta Stern, Jonathan Haidt, Lee Jussim, and Philip Tetlock wrote an article, “Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science,” in which the argued that the field of social psychology would benefit from the inclusion of more non-liberal voices (here I’m using “liberal” in the sense of current U.S. politics). Duarte et […] The post Political Attitudes in Social Environments appeared first on Statistical […]
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12:48 PM | Aloite: Suomen pelitutkimuksen seuran perustaminen
[Postitin tämän aiemmin tänään pelitutkimuksen finland[at]digra.org -postilistalle; tervetuloa mukaan sinne ja keskustelemaan aloitteesta; ohjeet liittymiseen löytyvät alta.] Tänään Pelitutkimuksen päivän yhteydessä käytiin keskustelua, kannattaisiko perustaa Suomen pelitutkimuksen seura (ry.) edistämään pelitutkimuksen asemaa maassamme. Koska kaikki kiinnostuneet eivät varmaankaan olleet paikalla … […]
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7:11 AM | Use Shakespeare criticism to inspire language processing research in cognitive science
I have a side-track of research in the area of “empirical humanities.” I got to present this abstract recently at a conference called “Cognitive futures in the humanities.” It might seem self-evident that “the pun … must be noticed as such for it to work its poetic effect.” Joel Fineman says it confidently in his […]

April 22, 2015

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6:00 PM | A message from the vice chairman of surgery at Columbia University: “Garcinia Camboja. It may be the simple solution you’ve been looking for to bust your body fat for good.”
Should Columbia University fire this guy just cos he says things like this: “You may think magic is make believe but this little bean has scientists saying they’ve found the magic weight loss cure for every body type—it’s green coffee extract.” “I’ve got the No. 1 miracle in a bottle to burn your fat. It’s […] The post A message from the vice chairman of surgery at Columbia University: “Garcinia Camboja. It may be the simple solution […]
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4:48 PM | Does working memory training change neurophysiology in childhood?
The short answer to that question is ‘yes’. We have known for some time that training particular cognitive skills, like working memory, can produce improvements in cognition. These improvements transfer to other untrained tasks, provided that they are similarly structured. However, we know very little about how these kinds of intensive cognitive training programmes change … Continue reading Does working memory training change neurophysiology in childhood? →
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1:12 PM | Instead of worrying about multiple hypothesis correction, just fit a hierarchical model.
Pejman Mohammadi writes: I’m concerned with a problem in multiple hypothesis correction and, despite having read your article [with Jennifer and Masanao] on not being concerned about it, I was hoping I could seek your advice. Specifically, I’m interested in multiple hypothesis testing problem in cases when the test is done with a discrete finite […] The post Instead of worrying about multiple hypothesis correction, just fit a hierarchical model. appeared first on Statistical […]
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