Posts

September 17, 2014

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7:30 PM | Without Western Diet, Asian-Americans Lower Insulin Resistance
Asian-Americans are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than Caucasian-Americans, and prone to develop the disease at lower body weights. Can Asian heritage and ancestral reliance on a high-fiber, low-fat Asian mean extra risks for those of Asian heritage?read more
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7:01 PM | M60-UCD1: Tiny Galaxy, Supermassive Black Hole
An ultracompact dwarf galaxy known as M60-UCD1 harbors a supermassive black hole – the smallest galaxy known to contain such a massive light-sucking object.  The astronomers used the Gemini North 8-meter optical-and-infrared telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea and photos taken by the Hubble Space Telescope to discover that M60-UCD1 has a black hole with a mass equal to 21 million suns. Their finding suggests plenty of other ultracompact dwarf galaxies likely also contain supermassive […]
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7:00 PM | Babies learn words differently as they age
Research has shown that most 18-month-olds learn an average of two to five new words a day; however, little is known about how children process information to learn new words as they move through the preschool years. In a new study, a University of Missouri researcher has found that toddlers learn words differently as they age, and a limit exists as to how many words they can learn each day. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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6:30 PM | Creating 480 Varieties Of Wheat Is Deserving Of The World Food Prize
There is never enough of this golden beauty. Credit: bradhigham, CC BYBy Angela White, University of Sheffield read more
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6:18 PM | Blame Evolution For Chimpanzee Lethal Aggression, Not Humans
Is chimpanzee intergroup aggression like primitive warfare, an adaptive strategy that gives the perpetrators an edge, or is it the consequence of human activities, such as provisioning - artificial feeding - by researchers or habitat destruction? A new study of the pattern of intergroup aggression in chimpanzees and pygmy chimpanzees (bonobos), their close relatives, finds that human impact isn't the culprit.    The research project compiled data collected over five decades from 18 […]
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6:00 PM | US Health System Doesn't Think About End Of Life - Yet
The United States is one of few wealthy nations without national or socialized health care and, as a result, the Hippocratic Oath has always been paramount. Even when it hasn't been efficient, doctors have tried to save and extend lives. As a result, the US health care system is not culturally prepared to deal with patients nearing the end of life and their families. A 21-member Institute of Medicine read more
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5:00 PM | Blood Test To Diagnose Depression Uses 9 RNA Blood Markers
Northwestern Medicine researchers say they have developed the first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults, by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions. read more
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4:38 PM | Sciencey Stuff You May Have Missed: Week 37
Digging through the web this week, I uncovered all this geeky goodness. You can find the thousands of links from …Continue reading →
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4:30 PM | Iberian Pig Genome Unchanged For The Last 500 Years
Humans may think we are eating paleo - like ancient ancestors - or organic - like before the advent of modern fertilizers and pesticides in the early 1800s - but nothing could be further from the truth. The microbiome of today shares little in common with people of even 100 years ago and if epigenetic claims about diet are true, our genome is different as well. And nothing should be changed like pigs, which are commonly now descended from Asian and European mixes. But a team of Spanish […]
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3:51 PM | What your metadata reveals about you
With a great deal of nervousness, Ton Siedsma agreed to an experiment. He would load an app on his smartphone that would send all its activity metadata for one week to Dimitri Tokmetzis who works on datajournalism projects and who would in turn forward it to the iMinds research team of Ghent University and Mike Moolenaar, owner of Risk and Security Experts. All three would analyze the metadata to see what they could learn about Siedsma. The amount they learned was shocking. […]
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3:48 PM | The Future May Mean Carhacking Instead Of Carjacking
An older, mechanical car is a closed system - the only way to hack it is to be physically present. But as automobiles become increasingly chip-oriented, any way to update software remotely means the potential to be hacked.  You won't be carjacked, you'll be carhackedThe car of the future will be safer, smarter and offer greater high-tech gadgets, but be warned without improved security the risk of car hacking is real, according to a QUT road safety expert.read more
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3:36 PM | Yoga may help people with bipolar disorder
People with bipolar disorder who do yoga believe their yoga practice has significant mental health benefits, reports a survey study in the September Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:35 PM | Quantum Short 2014 Film Contest Accepting Entries
When the 2008 Bond film came out with the title Quantum of Solace, science fans may have been hoping for a plot that hinged on quantum physics. Bond didn’t deliver, but there are some pretty... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:30 PM | Climate Council: Without Action, Rising Seas Will Cost Us Billions
Australia's coast is famous around the world - but rising sea levels are poised to make things a lot less fun. Credit: Adam J.W.C./Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SABy Martin Rice; John Hunter, University of Tasmania; Lesley Hughes, and Will Steffen, Australian National University read more
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3:28 PM | Ebola outbreak 'out of all proportion'
A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:25 PM | Toward optical chips
A promising light source for optoelectronic chips can be tuned to different frequencies. Chips that use light, rather than electricity, to move data would consume much less power — and energy efficiency is a growing concern as chips’ transistor counts rise. Subject:  Technology
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3:01 PM | Dark Matter Is A A Bose-Einstein Condensate?
What is dark matter? No one can say because it can't be detected or measured, but in science inference can help and we know that something is making gravity not work properly at the large scale. What we know as matter - stars, planets, us and other organisms - is baryonic matter, but it is only a small fraction of the universe. The rest gets lumped under blanket terms like dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter must be a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison […]
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3:01 PM | Dark Matter Is A Bose-Einstein Condensate?
What is dark matter? No one can say because it can't be detected or measured, but in science inference can help and we know that something is making gravity not work properly at the large scale. What we know as matter - stars, planets, us and other organisms - is baryonic matter, but it is only a small fraction of the universe. The rest gets lumped under blanket terms like dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter must be a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison […]
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3:00 PM | Sea Lamprey Shows The Origins Of Brain Development
Parasitic lamprey are a challenge to study but an important one - they are an invasive pest in the Great Lakes but difficult to study under controlled conditions because they live up to 10 years and only spawn for a few short weeks in the summer before they die.  Lamprey are slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless, sucking mouths, and rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights […]
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2:54 PM | DARPA Asked This Grad Student To Design A Jetpack That Makes You Faster. He Delivered
Jason Kerestes is a graduate student studying engineering at Arizona State University. Not long ago, Jason was approached by a team from ASU’s Human Machine Integration Labs. They had heard that he owned his own welding business and wanted his help on a project they were working on designing robotic prosthetics to help amputees. The project was being funded in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the agency responsible for developing new […]
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2:54 PM | Schizophrenia found to be multiple, genetically distinct disorders
New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is reported online Sept. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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2:47 PM | Magnetism: The Quantum Around You
We all use magnetism to stick photos to the fridge, find the North with a compass, store data on a hard drive. Although magnetism has been known for centuries, now we understand that magnetic materials only exist thanks to quantum mechanics. Join UNSW Australia's Andrea Morello in this series which proves that quantum mechanics has more of an impact on your daily life than you think.
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2:32 PM | Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work?
Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses. This information is organized into companion computer programs and mobile apps. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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2:31 PM | Trees Love Climate Change
Last decade, science faced an ecological puzzle: under hotter, drier conditions of global warming, forests should have been penalized but instead the rainforests thrived. It isn't the first time - the climate change that caused the death of the dinosaurs gave them a big boost also.read more
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2:18 PM | Mini-Mouth: Making Wine Better, Thanks To Nanoscience
Wine, with its thousands of chemical combinations, can be hard to judge. As numerous studies have shown, getting experts to distinguish between a $4 bottle of wine and a $40 one is in the luck range Can a nanosensor do better? Researchers at Aarhus University believe they are on that path, at least when it comes to dryness.read more
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2:04 PM | Yoga Is Not A Treatment For Bipolar Disorder
One way to know there will be no science at a nutrition conference is to find a yogic flying instructor on the panel roster. Yoga has a variety of mental and physical health benefits, just like all exercise and sports do, but it is not going to cure bipolar disorder or any other disease. Even taking a few dozen surveys of people with bipolar disorder who do hatha yoga, a questionable methodology, does not find clinical benefits outside the placebo range, according to a paper in the Journal […]
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1:57 PM | Vaccine sabotage suspected in childrens’ deaths in Syria
A devastating setback to the fight against the measles epidemic in Syria. At least 34 Syrian children die from contaminated measles vaccine |  The Guardian. At least 34 children have died in rebel-held Syria after being injected with contaminated measles vaccines, the rebel government said on Tuesday, warning that the deaths might be caused by… Source: Doubtful News
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1:28 PM | Builders and Blocks – Engineering Blood Vessels with Stem Cells
Back in 2001, when we first began studying how regenerative cells (stem cells or more mature progenitor cells) enhance blood vessel growth, our group as well as many of our colleagues focused on one specific type of blood vessel: arteries. Arteries are responsible for supplying oxygen to all organs and tissues of the body and arteries are more likely to develop gradual plaque build-up (atherosclerosis) than veins or networks of smaller blood vessels (capillaries). Once the amount of plaque […]

Paul JD, Coulombe KL, Toth PT, Zhang Y, Marsboom G, Bindokas VP, Smith DW, Murry CE & Rehman J (2013). SLIT3-ROBO4 activation promotes vascular network formation in human engineered tissue and angiogenesis in vivo., Journal of molecular and cellular cardiology, 64 124-31. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24090675

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1:10 PM | Church devastated by Ebola as cultural practices aid the spread
This is terrible. Her friends kept telling her to stop touching the sick. Liberia Diary: In Time of Ebola, a Town Loses Its ‘Prayer Warrior’ – Dispatch – WSJ. (Note that WSJ articles may go behind a paywall after a short time.) “Sis” Jartu Kerkulah was the praise-and-worship leader at the Bethel Heart of Faith… Source: Doubtful News
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1:04 PM | Dinosaurs Wore Party Hats!
  Little-known fact: Some dinosaurs wore hats.* And one group of duck-billed dinosaur had the best hats of all. This hat (henceforth, we’ll call it a crest, for scientific accuracy) was not just any fancy accoutrement. Not at all. This crest contained the dinosaur’s nasal passages. That’s right; the dinosaurs breathed through a hollow crest on their head. As an example, let’s take a look at the Parasaurolophus, who had the longest nasal passages of any animal ever, […]
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