Posts

October 23, 2014

+
9:52 AM | My Film Week in Review | 4 | [feat. Saving Private Ryan]
Saving Private Ryan (1998) Dir. Steven Spielberg   I have watched Saving Private Ryan more than any other film in history. I have seen it over 25 times. That’s 4225 minutes or nearly 71 hours of my life watching the same film.   This film is a master class in cinematography, and sound, and editing […] The post My Film Week in Review | 4 | [feat. Saving Private Ryan] appeared first on HeadStuff.
+
9:00 AM | Inspire: Three Questions with Ortis Deley
In our third video of our Inspire series we asked Ortis Deley former Gadget Show presenter and all round gadget fiend what got him into gadgets and technology. What you may not realise is that Ortis has a BSc in Pharmacy and has also been on Tomorrow’s World. You can find out more about Ortis […]
+
8:00 AM | On a Decade of Getting Pooped On By Birds
1. Washington, D.C., 2004 or so A bench around a circular planter, with a tree in it. I was eating my lunch. I felt something on my arm. We call it poop, but the stuff that comes out of birds’ behinds is more complicated than that. Birds, like most vertebrates that aren’t mammals, have a […]
+
8:00 AM | Cracked Science Video 3: Homeopathy
It’s October 23rd or 10-23, which has been suggested as Homeopathy Awareness Day, in homage to Avogradro’s number. Today is as good a day as any to investigate the claims made by homeopathy. Reading about homeopathy is one thing; seeing the dilutions is another. I hope this is graphic enough for you. I have also … Continue reading →
+
6:22 AM | How to be a Better Dancer, Science Edition
Are you awkward? Do you have trouble impressing on the dance floor? Fear not! Science has the solution to your woes. New research conducted by Dr. Nick Neave and Kristopher McCarty from Northumbria University investigated the attractiveness of different dance moves. 19 men between ages 18 and 35 with no previous dancing experience were asked […]
+
6:00 AM | Brian Hooker and Andrew Wakefield send a complaint to the CDC about its vaccine research. Everyone yawns.
The antivaccine movement and conspiracy theories go together like beer and Buffalo wings, except that neither are as good as, yes, beer and Buffalo wings. Maybe it’s more like manure and compost. In any case, the antivaccine movement is rife with conspiracy theories. I’ve heard and written about more than I can remember right now,…
+
4:59 AM | A New Twist on Flexagons?
For Martin Gardner’s 100th birthday Global Science source Martin Gardner introduced many including myself to the joys of Discrete Mathematics. His glorious monthly column “Mathematical Games” for Scientific American included some continuous mathematics too, of course; one could say it was on “Concrete Mathematics.” However, I conjecture—based on a quick flip of the several books […]
+
4:23 AM | Spacecraft could become autonomous with new Danish technology
New method of navigation for spacecraft and satellites will enable them to determine their position without relying on signals from Earth.
+
4:15 AM | Parkinson’s can start in the gut
Swedish scientists have demonstrated that Parkinson’s disease can move from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain.
+
3:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 22 October 2014
Study finds drugs still in recalled supplements. Where To Hunt For Haunted Homes. The Roles of Acupuncture and Other Components of Integrative Medicine in Cataclysmic Natural Disasters and Military Conflicts Scientists Build ‘Long-Distance’ Optical Tractor Beam | Physics | Sci-News.com. Gran spends nearly £4,000 to protect her house against wi-fi and mobile phone signals (From… Source: Doubtful News
+
3:46 AM | Book Review – The Violinist’s Thumb
If Nicollo Paganini, the titular musician of Sam Kean‘s “The Violinist’s Thumb,” had lived in the 1960s rather than the 1800s, the book may well have been named “Sex, Drugs, and Rock n’ Roll.” According to period reports, the 19th century virtuoso was a dervish of womanizing, opium abuse, and brilliant concerts, haunted by recurring […]
+
3:04 AM | Microscopic observation in live tissue, awesome! But don’t ignore the methods
It has been far too long since I wrote a blog post. Look out internet, I have a blogging itch that needs scratching, and it’ll probably cause a rash! …I apologize for that mental image. The NIH sent me an email this week (via the various government listservs I’m enrolled in) that was proudly declaring […]

Weigert R, Porat-Shliom N & Amornphimoltham P (2013). Imaging cell biology in live animals: ready for prime time., The Journal of cell biology, 201 (7) 969-79. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23798727

Natalie Porat-Shliom, Yun Chen, Muhibullah Tora, Akiko Shitara, Andrius Masedunskas & Roberto Weigertemail (2014). In Vivo Tissue-wide Synchronization of Mitochondrial Metabolic Oscillations, Cell Reports, Other:

Citation
+
2:07 AM | Elon Musk on SpaceX winning multi-billion contract from NASA
Elon Musk is looking happy following the $2.6B bid the SpaceX just won from NASA - against all odds! "Free education and increased space program fundings will guarantee our success in progression towards a better future and as of now we are doing the opposite" - Elon Musk
+
1:58 AM | Two families of comets discovered around nearby star
Biggest census ever of exocomets around Beta Pictoris. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
+
1:53 AM | Is dark matter coming from the sun?
For decades, astronomers and cosmologists have postulated that the Universe is filled with an invisible, mysterious mass known as “dark matter.” For decades, the search for this elusive matter has dominated the field of cosmology. Precise measurements were obtained over 20 years ago when dark matter was first mapped in galaxy halos. Only recently has the existence of dark matter over much larger scales than even galaxy clusters been detected. Subject:  […]
+
1:46 AM | Earliest modern human genome sequenced
Researchers discover fragments of Neandertal DNA in the genome of a 45,000-year-old modern human from Siberia. A research team led by Svante Pääbo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has sequenced the genome of a 45,000-year-old modern human male from western Siberia. Subject:  Genetics
+
1:37 AM | Original Star Wars movie models revealed
Before the days of computer graphics, film industry model makers constructed incredibly detailed, hand-made spaceship models for science fiction films. These models helped shape our collective vision of the future, and continue to do so today. Here are 140 up-close photos of ship and vehicle models constructed by ILM for the Original Star Wars Trilogy (1977-1983). Subject:  Technology
+
12:55 AM | Forecasters and Science Writers Knock Weather.Com For Hype
A low-end nor’easter is bringing wind and rain to much of the Northeast U.S. this evening, and Gale Warnings have been posted in the Atlantic as well. As nor’easters go, this is not really a big one, and we will see far worse over the coming months, with some of them bringing snow instead of rain.This is what I told my viewers here in Maryland/ Delaware, and so did many …
+
12:48 AM | Removing the salt from fracking
The boom in oil and gas produced through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is seen as a boon for meeting U.S. energy needs. But one byproduct of the process is millions of gallons of water that's much saltier than seawater, after leaching salts from rocks deep below the surface. Subject:  Technology
+
12:42 AM | 'Woz' to teach robotics at UTS
Apple Computer co-founder Steve "Woz" Wozniak has joined UTS as adjunct professor – the first adjunct appointment he has accepted at any university. The pioneer inventor, electronics engineer and computer programmer is working with staff and students in the Magic Lab (Innovation and Enterprise Research Laboratory), School of Software and Centre for Quantum Computation and Intelligent Systems in UTS's Faculty of Engineering and IT. "Woz loves the energy, the vibe and the robots […]
+
12:15 AM | Lynda Barry, Cartoonist Turned Professor, Gives Her Old Fashioned Take on the Future of Education
With college tuitions ballooning to the point of implosion, and free educational content proliferating online, the future of education is a scorching hot topic. So where are we heading? Coursera and Khan Academy? Video game-based curricula? Experience-driven microlearning? Or school […]test The post Lynda Barry, Cartoonist Turned Professor, Gives Her Old Fashioned Take on the Future of Education appeared first on Australian Science.
+
12:13 AM | The autonomous Google car may never actually happen
A good technology demonstration so wows you with what the product can do that you might forget to ask about what it can't. Case in point: Google's self-driving car. There is a surprisingly long list of the things the car can't do, like avoid potholes or operate in heavy rain or snow. Yet a consensus has emerged among many technologists, policymakers, and journalists that Google has essentially solved—or is on the verge of solving—all of the major issues involved with […]

October 22, 2014

+
11:40 PM | Democratic Education: A New Way to Look at Teaching and Learning (Opinion Piece)
Seven-year-old Penelope Day needs both hands to pick up the power drill. Penelope is spending the week at a day camp run by Construction Kids, a Brooklyn-based program that offers building classes throughout the year for kids as young as 2 years old. It’s one of a new and immensely popular wave of programs trying to shift kids away from computer screens toward actual, hands-on activities. Like building things from scratch. Using, yes, real, working power tools. With help […]
+
11:39 PM | Drink Up, Baby Boomer: Alcohol Associated With Better Memory
A new study found that people ages 60 and older who do not have dementia benefit from light alcohol consumption; it has been associated with higher episodic memory, the ability to recall memories of events.  Moderate alcohol consumption was also linked with a larger volume in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for episodic memory. The relationship between light alcohol consumption and episodic memory goes away if hippocampal volume is factored in, providing new evidence that […]
+
11:30 PM | Will Holding Thermal Printer Paper Really Send Your BPA Levels Soaring?
Structure of Bisphenol A. Credit: Ian MusgraveBy Ian MusgraveBisphenol A is in the news again. A paper just published in the Public Library of Science with the alarming title of “Holding Thermal Receipt Paper and Eating Food after Using Hand Sanitizer Results in High Serum Bioactive and Urine Total Levels of Bisphenol A (BPA)” is bound to ratchet up anxiety levels about this chemical yet again. read more
+
11:30 PM | Why Do We Find It So Hard To Write About Ourselves?
Credit: The ConversationBy Jordan Gaines Lewis, Penn State College of MedicineIf you’ve ever applied for a job, you know how hard it is to write the perfect cover letter that will make you stand out above all the other applicants. It’s a competitive job market, and more often than not, career seekers find themselves face-to-face with blank computer screens in an attempt to pen that one short masterpiece. read more
+
11:00 PM | The Comets Of Beta Pictoris
Beta Pictoris is a young star, only about 20 million years old, located about 63 light-years from us. It is surrounded by a huge disc of material, a very active young planetary system where gas and dust are produced by the evaporation of comets and the collisions of asteroids.read more
+
10:31 PM | Cancer Mutations, Now With Faster Modeling
By sequencing the genomes of tumor cells, thousands of genetic mutations have been linked with cancer. Sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process but MIT researchers have now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice. Their approach, based on the genome-editing technique clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) is much […]
+
10:31 PM | How Lymph Nodes Expand During Disease
A new paper finds that the same specialized immune cells that patrol the body and spot infections also trigger the expansion of the immune organs known as lymph nodes. The immune system defends the body from infections but can also spot and destroy cancer cells and lymph nodes are at the heart of this response, but it was unclear how they expand during disease.  Researchers  at Cancer Research UK's London Research Institute found that when a type of immune cell known as dendritic […]
+
10:24 PM | Love machines
From Pygmalion to Bladerunner, we keep falling for our robot creations. But then, what else is AI good for? Subject:  Artificial Intelligence
123456789
1,668 Results