Posts

September 28, 2014

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5:25 PM | Most metal-poor star hints at universe’s first supernovae
In a new study, researchers point out that the elemental abundance of the most iron-poor star can be explained by elements ejected from supernova explosions of the universe’s first stars. This reveals that massive stars, which are several tens of times more immense than the Sun, were present among the first stars. Iron-poor stars provide … Continue reading →
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5:21 PM | Termites evolved complex bioreactors 30 million years ago
Achieving complete breakdown of plant biomass for energy conversion in industrialized bioreactors remains a complex challenge, but new research shows that termite fungus farmers solved this problem more than 30 million years ago. The new insight reveals that the great success of termite farmers as plant decomposers is due to division of labor between a … Continue reading →
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5:15 PM | Now That’s a Wee Little Infographic
  53 million years old, and it may be the smallest mammal that has ever lived. Batodonoides vanhouteni was a shrew-like mammal that scientific illustrator Jen Christiansen has deftly described... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:00 PM | If Trees Could Talk What Tales They'd Tell
Permafrost thaw kills forests in Canada, while drought kills trees in India and Borneo. In the U.S., in Virginia, over-abundant deer eat trees before they reach maturity, while nitrogen pollution has changed soil chemistry in Panama.  Continents apart, trees have many similar ways to die. Many of the changes occurring in forests worldwide are attributable to human impacts on climate, atmospheric chemistry, land use and animal populations - no surprise, writing papers lamenting humanity is […]
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5:00 PM | GABA And Getting Control Over Tourette Syndrome
Tourette syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by involuntary, repetitive, and stereotyped movements or utterances. New evidence explains how those with Tourette syndrome in childhood often manage to gain control over those tics. In individuals with the condition, a portion of the brain involved in planning and executing movements shows an unusual increase compared to the average brain in the production of a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter known as GABA. read more
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4:00 PM | 325,000 Year Old Stone Age Site In Armenia Leads To Human Technology Rethink
Artifacts from a 325,000-year-old site in Armenia finds that human technological innovation occurred intermittently throughout the Old World, rather than spreading from a single point of origin (usually hypothesized as Africa), as previously thought. read more
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4:00 PM | Spin-Based Computing: Single Material Is Both Semiconductor And Magnetic
Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world but they are really 19th century advancements still being optimized in the 21st. In our current scheme, semiconductors process electrical information while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage but research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material.read more
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3:15 PM | Interstellar Molecules Branch Out
Scientists have time detected a carbon-bearing molecule with a "branched" structure in interstellar space. The molecule, iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN), was discovered in the giant gas cloud Sagittarius B2, a region of ongoing star formation close to the center of our galaxy that is a hot-spot for molecule-hunting astronomers. read more
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3:10 PM | How to mend a broken heart
Instead of brooding over a failed relationship, psychologist advises a couple of aspirin and distancing oneself from the event. Consider it a win for the stiff upper lip. Talking about a failed relationship doesn’t soothe the pain of heartbreak and can make some people feel even worse, a US psychologist claims. Instead of brooding over broken relationships, Walter Mischel recommends a couple of aspirin to take the edge off the pain and urges people to distance themselves from […]
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3:03 PM | A conversation between Richard Dawkins and Stephen Hawking
A unique discussion between evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking.
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3:00 PM | RM 8027: World's Smallest Reference Material
If good things come in small packages, then nanoparticles are going to make engineers very happy. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently issued Reference Material (RM) 8027, the smallest known reference material ever created for validating measurements of these man-made, ultra-fine particles between 1 and 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter) in size.read more
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2:44 PM | Putting the squeeze on quantum information
CIFAR researchers have shown that information stored in quantum bits can be exponentially compressed without losing information. The achievement is an important proof of principle, and could be useful for efficient quantum communications and information storage. Compression is vital for modern digital communication. It helps movies to stream quickly over the Internet, music to fit into digital players, and millions of telephone calls to bounce off of satellites and through fibre optic […]
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2:19 PM | Science Film Festivals Across the Pond Abundant in October
If you are in Paris, Bristol or Vienna over the next month, you might consider adding a science film festival to your agenda! First, Pariscience International Film Festival will be held from 2nd  to... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:07 PM | Eyes on the Rise: Sea Level Rise Rally
Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Dr. Robert Gutsche, Jr., Assistant Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Florida International University and a part of the team at Eyes on the Rise, a crowd-hydrology citizen …The post Eyes on the Rise: Sea Level Rise Rally appeared first on CitizenSci.
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1:00 PM | Why Ice Sheets Will Keep Melting For Centuries To Come
It may already be too late to stop Antarctic ice sliding into the ocean. Credit: EPABy Eelco Rohling, University of SouthamptonIce sheets respond slowly to changes in climate, because they are so massive that they themselves dominate the climate conditions over and around them. But once they start flowing faster towards the shore and melting into the ocean the process takes centuries to reverse. Ice sheets are nature’s freight trains: tough to start moving, even harder to stop. read
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7:59 AM | Personalized electroceuticals
We have a new preprint online. In this study, we explore with computer models why protocols for the use of medical devices that treat migraines should be personalized. Our numerical simulations suggest that in migraine pathological activity nucleates in hot spots and traverses the convoluted cortical surface like being in a labyrinth. As a result, accessible target structures for neuromodulation are like fingerprints, they are individual features of each migraine sufferer. Within the scientific […]
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4:30 AM | Researchers are trying to solve a Danish castle mystery
Who built the lengendary Hammershus castle? Archaeologist are trying to find the answer.
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3:48 AM | Blondie’s Back!
It's Saturday night and Blondie's back! We'll have to start a Blondie watch.
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3:00 AM | The information war – The NZ Listener takes up arms
First – have a look at this satirical programme from Germany. It has English captions but is worth watching a few times for the subtleties. I have commented before about the information war going on around the Ukrainian conflict. It … Continue reading →
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3:00 AM | Microsoft Closes SVC
Some additional thoughts Microsoft Research source Omer Reingold is a brilliant researcher, and now all can see that he is also a very classy and thoughtful person. As you all know by now, he and many others have suddenly lost their jobs with the closing of Microsoft’s Silicon Valley Campus (SVC) Research Lab. The lab […]
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1:29 AM | Report from Graph Drawing
I'm currently in the process of returning* from Würzburg, Germany, where I attended the 22nd International Symposium on Graph Drawing (GD 2014) and was one of the invited speakers at the associated EuroGIGA/CCC Ph.D. school on graph drawing.The format for the Ph.D. school was three one-hour lectures in the morning and three hours of working on exercises in the afternoon, for two days. My contribution was a high-level overview of graph drawing methods that involve curves (an updated version […]
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12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
New Sunday, new editor’s selection stories. This week brought the spring to the Southern Hemisphere and the fall to the Northern Hemisphere. It also encouraged us with a lot of new research efforts, studies and discoveries. Right now we would […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:11 AM | Meet the Arizona Blonde Tarantula
I've said before that if you want your daughter to be a scientist, you should buy her a bug book. You should also teach her not to be afraid of spiders. One of my guilty pleasures is taking photographs of desert plants and wildlife. With my trusty Canon T3i, I hunt for subjects -- often those "useless creatures" I spoke about a few blog posts ago. Sometimes what I find is not what I was looking for. My friend, Cecil... Read more

September 27, 2014

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11:54 PM | How to Look for Pine Marten
The pine marten (Martes martes) is one of Ireland’s most beautiful but elusive mammals. It is notoriously difficult to see as it tends to be mostly nocturnal, and is a naturally shy animal. It is about the size of a … Continue reading →

O’Mahony, D., O’Reilly, C. & Turner, P. (2012). Pine marten (Martes martes) distribution and abundance in Ireland: A cross-jurisdictional analysis using non-invasive genetic survey techniques, Mammalian Biology - Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde, 77 (5) 351-357. DOI: 10.1016/j.mambio.2012.04.001

Citation
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11:07 PM | Water On Earth Is Older Than The Sun
It's no surprise that water was crucial to the formation of life on Earth. What may surprise you is that water on earth is older than the sun itself. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments came into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. A new paper in Science says that much of our Solar System's water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space. Water is found throughout the Solar System, not just […]
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10:45 PM | If Fireflies Weren’t Cool Enough, Here’s An Awesome Firefly Time-Lapse Video!
Photographer/filmmaker Vincent Brady teamed up with National Geographic to put together an awe-inspiring time-lapse video using awesome stills of fireflies. The video/stills were captured at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, and Grand Ledge, Michigan, during the summer of 2013. Enjoy! Fireflies or “lightning bugs” as some people call them, are a winged beetle that scientist believe to be over 2,000 species of on our planet. According to Wikipedia… “Light […]
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9:16 PM | August on the interwebz
Last month ended in a kind of frenzy! Between DragonCon, our big outreach event of the year over at CosmoQuest, and classes starting for my first semester teaching, it was quite busy around here. In addition, we lost a dear…Read more →
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9:14 PM | You don’t have to be Google to build an artificial brain
When Google used 16,000 machines to build a simulated brain that could correctly identify cats in YouTube videos, it signaled a turning point in the art of artificial intelligence. Applying its massive cluster of computers to an emerging breed of AI algorithm known as “deep learning,” the so-called Google brain was twice as accurate as any previous system in recognizing objects pictured in digital images, and it was hailed as another triumph for the mega data centers […]
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8:44 PM | Ghost-like little girl with deer – some fake, some real
Most photos of little girls or other figures captured on trail camera (so they say) are fake. They are photoshopped or otherwise manipulated, often created with use of a ghost app on a phone. But the latest one, making the rounds on paranormal and mystery mongering feeds on Facebook, looks shocking, creepy, sparking speculation as to… Source: Doubtful News
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8:00 PM | Cryptophytes: Matryoshka Dolls Of The Waters
A team of researchers headed by Prof Dr. Nicole Frankenberg-Dinkel at Ruhr-University Bochum have revealed similarities and differences in the assembly of the light-harvesting machinery of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta compared to cyanobacteria and red algae. Cryptophytes: Matryoshka dolls of the watersread more
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