Posts

October 19, 2014

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2:30 PM | Apoptosis Evolution: Cellular Self-destruction Has Been Around Almost As Long As Cells Have
It seems counter-intuitive that in order to survive best as a species, not everything can live forever, but some cells in our bodies are fated to die, and a Mission Impossible-style auto-destruct program insures they do. This elaborate cell death program, known as apoptosis, got a little more insight with a study on the evolution of caspase-8, a key cell death initiator molecule that was first identified in humans. By performing the most extensive evolutionary analysis of the Casp8 protein […]
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2:01 PM | Humans May Have A Spidey Sense For Blind Spots
Credit: Tobyotter via flickrBy: Nala Rogers, Inside Science(Inside Science) -- The spider's iconic leggy shape can abruptly yank our attention, even when we’re focused on something else, according to a new study. Other shapes such as houseflies and hypodermic needles don’t draw our attention in the same way. This suggests that spiders may be hard-wired into our visual systems, helping us avoid a threat that our ancestors faced for millions of years. read more
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1:00 PM | Discovering A Viking Hoard: A Day In The Life Of A Metal Detectorist
Credit: mikecogh, CC BY-SABy Suzie Thomas, University of Helsinki read more
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12:09 PM | Ebola- Face The Fear
Ebola, the emerging threat from Africa, is without doubt a lethal killer. This serious threat has a grossly high mortality rate; the fatality rate for Ebola’s haemorrhagic fever (now known […]
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11:18 AM | This Week in Chemistry: Improving Autism Symptoms, & Making Batteries Safer
It’s been another bumper week in the world of chemistry research, with a range of stories to choose from for this week’s graphic. Highlights include the discovery that a compound found in broccoli could help improve behaviour in autism, and a new detection method for metal contamination in water using DNA. As always, links to studies […]
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11:08 AM | Welcome To Night Vale Live: The Librarian (Olympia Theatre, 16th October)
It’s an odd crowd, in the Olympia Theatre tonight. A lot younger than the usual theatre crowd – in fact, the majority seem to be teenagers, dotted with geeky-looking types, the alternative crowd, and the occasional bemused parent. In other words, it’s a perfect cross-section of the fans that have lifted Welcome To Night Vale […] The post Welcome To Night Vale Live: The Librarian (Olympia Theatre, 16th October) appeared first on HeadStuff.
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7:46 AM | Doing Elitism Wrong
So, Katie Mack pointed me to this webcomic, which shows two characters stargazing. “I’m surprised more people don’t love science. It’s so fascinating.” “By science, do you mean spending countless hours collecting data and studying dense research articles? Or do you just think space is pretty?” OK. Let’s unpack the wrongness of this. (It’s been […]
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4:23 AM | Scientists create crystals that absorb and store oxygen
New substance binds extremely concentrated quantities of oxygen, could have many uses as the oxygen can be released again when needed.
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12:42 AM | When science deniers turn to science
Cartoon by Joe Heller, www.hellertoon.com Readers no doubt recognise this situation. It’s a pretty blatant form of science denial. Division of science and into pro and anti forms –  such as pro-fluoridation and anti-fluoridation science –  is just another form of … Continue reading →
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12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
New Sunday, new editor’s choices! In comparison with the previous one, which brought us heaps of Nobel awards, this one seems as quite peaceful and usual. But, is it? Throughout today’s selection, we will hear more about the future of […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.

October 18, 2014

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11:42 PM | Did You Know… Reheating Your Pasta Makes It Significantly Less Fattening
This might sound crazy, but letting your pasta cool down and then reheating can actually make it significantly less fattening. The findings were uncovered by Michael Mosley on the latest episode of BBC 2’s health program Trust Me, I’m A Doctor. The reason that high-carb foods like pasta are so fattening in the first place is because carbohydrates are broken down and absorbed as simple sugars. So when you eat them, your glucose levels spike, prompting […]
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10:59 PM | The Virtual Interview: Edward Snowden
The New Yorker Festival presents Edward Snowden in conversation with Jane Mayer.
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10:47 PM | iPhones for eye health
Smartphone technology is a widely available resource which may also be a portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, according to results of a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Researchers from the Ross Eye Institute at the University at Buffalo-SUNY are successfully using an iPhone® application as an inexpensive, portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, including in […]
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10:40 PM | Birth season affects your mood in later life
New research shows that the season you are born has a significant impact on your risk of developing mood disorders. People born at certain times of year may have a greater chance of developing certain types of affective temperaments, which in turn can lead to mood disorders (affective disorders). This work is being presented at the European College of CNP Congress in Berlin. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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9:24 PM | “It Should Have Been Obvious”
I can’t find my copy of The God Delusion. It wandered off to join the fairies in the Boston Public Garden, or something. This is only a problem when I’d like to look something up in it, to point to a passage and say, “Ah! If we’d read more carefully, we could have guessed that […]
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9:07 PM | Red is the color of love for monkeys, too
Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions. Subject:  Animal Research
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8:52 PM | A very simple introduction to machine learning…
Machine learning quite simply refers to the use of algorithms to make predictions and solve problems involving properties of things and how they behave in response to an outcome. The nature of problems Properties themselves can take a variety of … Continue reading →
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8:51 PM | The Saga of Psychic Sally and the Persistent Skeptics
Sally Morgan calls herself “the original 21st Century medium.” Her Facebook page has over 93K “likes”. Her bio reads: Sally’s sell out theatre shows have been seen by a staggering half a million people, her hit television shows are watched by millions and her books are best-sellers! With her unique personality, refreshing approach and uncanny… Source: Doubtful News
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7:39 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 17/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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7:39 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 17/10/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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6:55 PM | Scientists Just Built A Robot That Performs Brain Surgery Through Your Cheek
3-D printing, robotics and other technological advances have been revolutionizing the field of medicine in the past few years. From 3-D printed prosthetics for amputee victims to the bionic pancreas, there is no denying that modern medicine owes many of its recent advances to technology. Now, researchers from Vanderbilt University have designed a robot that can perform brain surgery on people suffering from conditions that affect the hippocampus, a region of the […]
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6:01 PM | IPTF13bvn: Hydrogen-Deficient Supernova Progenitor Discovered?
A recent model says it provides the first characterization of the progenitor for a hydrogen-deficient supernova. Their simulation predicts that a bright hot star, which is the binary companion to an exploding object, remains after the explosion so they secured observation time with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for such a remaining star.  read more
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5:31 PM | High-Fat Meals: Males Impacted Most
Unless you are trapped at a Larry Summers protest at Harvard in 2006, you know that male and female brains are not equal in all ways. Another study affirms that, finding a difference when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute scientist Deborah Clegg, PhD, and colleagues found that the brains of male laboratory mice exposed to the same high-fat diet as their female counterparts developed brain inflammation and heart […]
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4:50 PM | Earth's Biggest Migration Gets A New Explanation
Credit: WikipediaBy Peter Gwynne, Inside Science(Inside Science) – Each day small sea creatures known as plankton rise from deep underwater to the ocean's surface during the night and then return to the depths in daytime. Zoologists describe this “diel” movement, named after the Latin word for day, as Earth’s biggest migration. read more
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4:31 PM | This Video of Night Skiers Wearing LED-Covered Suits Is Incredible!
The video, which was filmed in a remote part of Canada, is the product of a collaboration between Swedish ad agency Ahlstrand & Wållgren and Philips TV. Nick Waggoner, one of the directors of the film, spoke with Huffington Post about making the spectacular video: HP: So, how’d you come up with the idea for the light suit segment? Nick Waggoner: The LED suit was a product of our collaboration with Swedish agency Ahlstrand and Wållgren and Philips TV. It […]
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4:29 PM | Climate Change: It’s Only Human To Exaggerate, But Science Itself Does Not
Credit: EPABy Rob MacKenzie, University of BirminghamTo exaggerate is human, and scientists are human.Exaggeration and the complementary art of simplification are the basic rhetorical tools of human intercourse. So yes, scientists do exaggerate. So do politicians, perhaps even when, as the UK’s former environment secretary Owen Paterson did, they claim that climate change forecasts are “widely exaggerated”. read more
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4:07 PM | KAMRA Inlay: Reading Glasses May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past
Reading glasses have served us for centuries. Why fix a good thing? Because science and technology can.  Presbyopia, blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, could one day be relegated to olden days if a thin ring inserted into the eye gains popularity.read more
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3:56 PM | Hey! Apparently It’s Okay To Be Smart is in this month’s O the...
Hey! Apparently It’s Okay To Be Smart is in this month’s O the Oprah Magazine! Go pick one up! I was only beaten by Schweddy Balls on this “5 cool things” list, which is a defeat I’m willing to accept.
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3:38 PM | Journey to the center of the Earth
A UCSB geochemist uses helium and lead isotopes to gain insight into the makeup of the planet’s deep interior. A UC Santa Barbara geochemist studying Samoan volcanoes has found evidence of the planet’s early formation still trapped inside the Earth. Known as hotspots, volcanic island chains such as Samoa can ancient primordial signatures from the early solar system that have somehow survived billions of years. Subject:  Earth Science
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3:34 PM | Could reading glasses soon be a thing of the past?
A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. A corneal inlay device currently undergoing clinical review in the United States improved near vision well enough for 80 percent of the participating patients to read a newspaper without disturbing […]
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