Posts

January 31, 2015

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7:57 PM | What's Happening With Your Donated Blood And Tissue Sample? Do You Care?
When donating blood, plasma, human tissue or any other bodily sample for medical research, most people might not think about how it's being used. But if you were told, would you care? A new Michigan State University study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, indicates that most people are willing to donate just knowing that their contribution is going toward research. But, when specific scenarios are brought into the equation, that willingness changes. read more
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7:57 PM | Corn Co-products From Wet Milling Fine For Pig Diets
Many co-products from the corn processing industry may be used in diets fed to pigs. Much attention over the last 10 years has been on co-products produced from the biofuels industry, including distillers dried grains and high-protein distillers grains. However, the wet milling industry also produces many different co-products that may be used in pig diets. Because little information about co-products produced from the wet milling industry has been reported, research from the University of […]
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7:47 PM | Science Problems: Scientists fault education and media, but should they?
When it comes to problems for science today, scientists largely fault deficits in K-12 STEM education, public and media interest in science. But scientists should be asking themselves the hard questions. What have you done to advance the conversation? I'm going to keep this commentary brief, because dissertation writing calls my name. What I really want is for other science communication scholars to weigh in here on some of the Pew results concerning scientists' perceptions of public and […]
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7:47 PM | Science Problems: Scientists fault education and media, but should they?
When it comes to problems for science today, scientists largely fault deficits in K-12 STEM education, public and media interest in science. But scientists should be asking themselves the hard questions. What have you done to advance the conversation? I'm going to keep this commentary brief, because dissertation writing calls my name. What I really want is for other science communication scholars to weigh in here on some of the Pew results concerning scientists' perceptions of public and […]
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7:35 PM | Scientists and public disagree, but let’s not get too excited
A new set of surveys of scientists and the public finds the two groups have widely different views about scientific issues. Conducted by the Pew Research Center in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the survey found scientists tended to have a more positive opinion of many technologies than the general public. Subject:  Technology
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7:34 PM | Before Manned Spaceflight There Was “Chimpanned” Spaceflight
On January 31, 1961, a brave 3-year-old chimpanzee was strapped into a capsule inside the Mercury Redstone rocket and launched 160 miles above the earth. For 16 minutes, he orbited at a speed of 5857... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:21 PM | Why does shoveling snow increase risk of heart attacks?
Parts of the northeastern United States are still digging out after a blizzard. And more snow is on the way. You may have seen news stories warning that shoveling snow can raise the risk of a heart attack, or heart problems, at least for some people. So, why is that? Subject:  Health & Medicine
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7:05 PM | Gravitational waves from early universe remain elusive
A joint analysis of data from the Planck space mission and the ground-based experiment BICEP2 has found no conclusive evidence of gravitational waves from the birth of our universe, despite earlier reports of a possible detection. The collaboration between the teams has resulted in the most precise knowledge yet of what signals from the ancient gravitational waves should look like, aiding future searches. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
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6:27 PM | Pain From Shots Shows Up In Infant Brain Activity Too
It's no surprise that pain shows up in brain scans but a new study finds distinct, consistent patterns of brain activity in response to needles used in vaccinations. The researchers performed elecroencephalography (EEG) in 15 healthy babies receiving routine vaccinations. A noninvasive and painless procedure, EEG is done to measure electrical activity in the brain, using electrodes placed in specific locations on the scalp. 12 infants were tested during vaccinations at age one to two months, […]
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5:41 PM | Coop’s Citizen Sci Scoop: Recap of Jan 28 #CitSciChat
A few days ago was the first #CitSciChat, sponsored by SciStarter and my lab (The Counter Culture). The #CitSciChat was a fast-paced and exhilarating hour of citizen science discussion. Guest panelist and many others carried out a lively conversation structured … Continue reading »The post Coop’s Citizen Sci Scoop: Recap of Jan 28 #CitSciChat appeared first on CitizenSci.
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5:32 PM | Bitcoin Scams Steal $11 Million
Bitcoin is the digital world's most popular "virtual currency", with millions in circulation. Fraudulent schemes have scammed at least $11 million in these virtual deposits from customers over the past four years, according to new cyber-security research from Southern Methodist University. In the first empirical study of its kind, the authors found that four different types of schemes using authentic-looking web-based investment and banking outlets lured customers so deposits could be […]
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5:00 PM | Is Your Lipstick Causing Early Menopause?
by Ian Musgrave, Senior lecturer in Pharmacology at University of AdelaideI was going to avoid blogging on this topic, but seeing as the story made the Australian with the headline “Chemicals in lipstick and cleaning products linked to early menopause”, I feel I have to weigh in a bit to avoid undue panic and the inevitable dangers of people hurling their lipsticks out the window at great speed. Also, there are issues of science communication and “the dose makes the […]
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4:34 PM | Fewer Wild Fish Needed: Genetically Modified Plants Produce Omega-3 Fish Oil
Researchers have revealed that genetically modified Camelina plants produce omega-3 fish oils suitable for feeding Atlantic salmon. The new GMO plants can produce up to 20% of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), one of the two omega-3 LC PUFA conferring health benefits. Consumption of omega-3 fish oils, specifically long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 LC-PUFA), through eating oily fish like salmon and mackerel, has been linked with improved cardiovascular health and cognitive […]
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4:11 PM | Reconciling Two Models Of Cellular Aging: Understanding The Nuclear Landscape
Researchers have mapped the physical structure of the nuclear landscape to better understand changes in genomic interactions occurring in cell senescence and aging. Their findings have allowed them to reconcile the contradictory observations of two current models of aging: cellular senescence of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts and cellular models of an accelerated aging syndrome.read more
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3:41 PM | Experienced hunters hog-tie “Boarzilla” in Texas
He’s quite a monster and it was a job to capture and secure this nearly 800 lbs animal and return it to the site from which it escaped. Hunters bag, tie 790-pound “BoarZilla” hog | The Flash Today De Leon’s Blaine Garcia is about to put a whole new twist in the legends of Texas… Source: Doubtful News Related posts:Employees and customers succumb to mystery illness That’s not rain on the radar Sometimes it really is a kangaroo in Texas
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3:31 PM | Doe Porn Make People More Likely To Engage In Unsafe Sexual Behaviors?
Risky sexual behaviors such as casual sex, lack of condom use and a high number of sexual partners have been linked to poor health outcomes, including obviously an increased incidence of sexually transmitted infections, in the effects part of the psychological sex equation, but what causes that risky behavior? read more
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3:12 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 30/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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3:12 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 30/01/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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2:30 PM | BICEP2 Found Interstellar Dust, Not Primordial Gravitational Waves
The Universe began about 13.8 billion years ago and evolved from an extremely hot, dense and uniform state to the rich and complex cosmos of galaxies, stars and planets we see today. The key source of information about that history is the Cosmic Microwave Background - CMB - the legacy of light emitted only 380 000 years after the Big Bang.Astronomers have been searching searching for a particular signature of cosmic ‘inflation’ – a very brief accelerated expansion that, […]
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2:17 PM | Cash is Bad for Creativity? Yeah, Right
A discussion once again erupted this month, fuelled by rapid re-sharing of the headline, “Why cash and copyright are bad for creativity” and a post on The Conversation by Dan Hunter. The... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:03 PM | The tell-tale signs of a galactic merger
Astronomers have captured a striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714. This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape, dragged streams of material out into space, and triggered bright bursts of star formation. NGC 7714 is a spiral galaxy at 100 … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | The mouth of the beast: VLT images cometary globule CG4
Like the gaping mouth of a gigantic celestial creature, the cometary globule CG4 glows menacingly in this new image from ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Although it appears to be big and bright in this picture, this is actually a faint nebula, which makes it very hard for amateur astronomers to spot. The exact nature of … Continue reading →
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12:40 PM | ‘Yellowballs’ are part of the development of massive star
Citizen scientists wanted to know: What are the yellow objects on these infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope? Astronomers now report that the “yellowballs” are part of the development of massive stars. “Any ideas what these bright yellow fuzzy objects are?” the volunteer wrote on a project message board. Well, that sparked some discussion … Continue reading →
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12:37 PM | Bubbles from the galactic center: A key to understanding dark matter and our galaxy’s past?
The astrophysicists who discovered two enormous radiation bubbles in the center of our galaxy discuss what they may tell us about the Milky Way and how they could help in the search for dark matter. Fresh from giving the January 6 Rossi Prize lecture at the Winter American Astronomical Society meeting, three physicists who discovered … Continue reading →
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12:29 PM | Ancient skull shows modern humans colonized Eurasia 60-70,000 years ago
A skull provides direct anatomical evidence that fills a problematic time gap of modern human migration into Europe. It is also the first proof that anatomically modern humans existed at the same time as Neanderthals in the same geographical area. Until now. The discovery in the Manot Cave of Israel’s Western Galilee of an almost … Continue reading →
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12:22 PM | CAT scan of nearby supernova remnant reveals frothy interior
Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, is one of the most well studied supernova remnants in our galaxy. But it still holds major surprises. Astronomers have now generated a new 3-D map of its interior using the astronomical equivalent of a CAT scan. They found that the Cas A supernova remnant is composed of … Continue reading →
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12:16 PM | Taking Rory Gilmore Off Her Pedestal
Rory Gilmore is painted as the ideal offspring: a mature, responsible, studious, polite overachiever with fortunate looks. She’s popular among her peers, adored by all adults, and admired by strangers. She’s ambitious but humble. She spends her free time reading classic literature and attending quaint small-town events with her altogether wholesome boyfriend (at least, in [...] The post Taking Rory Gilmore Off Her Pedestal appeared first on HeadStuff.
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12:06 PM | Long-necked ‘dragon’ discovered in China
Paleontologists have discovered a new species of a long-necked dinosaur from a skeleton found in China. The new species belongs to a group of dinosaurs called mamenchisaurids, known for their extremely long necks sometimes measuring up to half the length of their bodies. Most sauropods, or long-necked dinosaurs, have necks only about one third the … Continue reading →
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11:59 AM | Did genetic links to modern maladies provide ancient benefits?
A study finds that humanity’s early ancestors had genetic variations associated with modern disease, and now the question is why BUFFALO, N.Y. — Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting our ancient … Continue reading →
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11:52 AM | The origin of life: Labyrinths as crucibles of life
Water-filled micropores in hot rock may have acted as the nurseries in which life on Earth began. A team has now shown that temperature gradients in pore systems promote the cyclical replication and emergence of nucleic acids. How and in what habitats did the first life-forms arise on the young Earth? One crucial precondition for … Continue reading →
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