Posts

March 03, 2015

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5:00 PM | 'Just Say No' To Behavior-Calming Drugs For Alzheimer Patients
Doctors are writing lots of prescriptions for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, but non-drug approaches work better and carry far fewer risks, according to a new paper.  In contrast to current protocol non-drug approaches should be the first choice for treating dementia patients' common symptoms such as irritability, agitation, depression, anxiety, sleep problems, aggression, apathy and delusions, write a team in British Medical […]
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4:30 PM | Immune Signatures Evidence That Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Is A Biological Illness
Researchers have identified distinct immune changes in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS) or systemic exertion intolerance disease. This is the first robust physical evidence that ME/CFS is a biological illness as opposed to a psychological disorder, and the first evidence that the disease has distinct stages and could help improve diagnosis and identify treatment options for the disabling disorder, in which symptoms range […]
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4:28 PM | The HeadStuff Launch – with Thanks
The HeadStuff Launch was on Thursday 26th of February in the lovely Block T in Smithfield, Dublin. It was the culmination of some very busy weeks and a couple of stressful days for me. But it was great. As in, other people thought it was great. I started enjoying it at 10pm, when it was [...] The post The HeadStuff Launch – with Thanks appeared first on HeadStuff.
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4:25 PM | A clearer view of clouds
Meteorologists sometimes struggle to accurately predict the weather here on Earth, but now we can find out how cloudy it is on planets outside our solar system, thanks to researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In a paper to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, researchers in the Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) at MIT describe a technique that analyzes data from NASA’s Kepler space observatory to determine the types of clouds […]
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4:09 PM | Love in 36 questions
In Mandy Len Catron’s Modern Love essay, “To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This,” she refers to a study by the psychologist Arthur Aron (and others) that explores whether intimacy between two strangers can be accelerated by having them ask each other a specific series of personal questions. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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4:08 PM | Suicide Rates In Older US Adults Linked To The Economy
How will we know if the economy has really gotten better, rather than using bogus claims about employment or how well Wall Street executives are doing? When senior citizens stop killing themselves. Suicide rates for adults between 40 and 64 years of age in the U.S. rose about 40% since 1999, with a sharp rise after in 2007 that continued during the economic downturn of 2008 and on, which led to disproportionate effects on house values, household finances, and retirement savings for that age […]
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3:45 PM | Non-drug therapy works best for Alzheimer's patients
Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report. In fact, non-drug approaches should be the first choice for treating dementia patients' common symptoms such as irritability, agitation, depression, anxiety, sleep problems, aggression, apathy and delusions, say the researchers in a paper […]
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3:35 PM | The First Big Challenge For A New Scientist Is Finding A Job
The typical biography of a scientist might look something like this:At a young age, a boy or girl discovers a love for science. Their dream is to become perhaps a geologist, a chemist, or a marine biologist. read more
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3:20 PM | Got Climate Questions? Check Facebook…Seriously!
If you've got questions about climate, just hop on Facebook. ...nope, I'm not joking. Social media has given me a chance to become acquainted with a lot of very interesting people. Many of whom I would never have crossed paths with in the real-world because of the oceans in between. One of those people is Alvin Stone -  Media and Communications Manager for the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science. During one of our online […]
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3:14 PM | Enzyme Modification Boosts Crop Yields
Enzymes are the workhorses of our bodies, they make biochemical reactions happen faster than they otherwise would and sometimes essential reactions would not happen at all without them. The Rubisco enzyme, the most abundant protein on the planet, has one of the most significant responsibilities in life on Earth - the conversion of carbon dioxide to organic compounds, the building blocks of all plant and animal cells.read more
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2:45 PM | Insulin Resistance, Behavioral Disorders Linked
People with diabetes are prone to anxiety and depression but others with chronic diseases that require similar levels of management suffer from anxiety and depression less. Why that might be is unclear but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have offered an explanation, gleaned by genetically modifying mice to make their brains resistant to insulin. They found that the animals exhibited behaviors that suggest anxiety and depression, and then pinpointed a mechanism that lowers levels of the key […]
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2:45 PM | Peanut Consumption Decreases Mortality
Want to lower your risk of dying from a heart attack? Go a little nuts.Peanuts are getting a modern rehabilitation.  Except for severe cases, it has been found that peanut allergies will go away if kids eat them early, and when they reach adulthood they will have less likelihood of dying from heart disease - and be an equalizer across low-income and racially diverse populations.read more
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2:45 PM | Genetic Mutations Associated With Leukemia Are Almost Inevitable With Age
A new paper based on a study of 4,219 people without any evidence of blood cancer nonetheless found that up to 20 percent of people aged 50-60 and more than 70 percent of people over 90 have blood cells with the same gene changes as found in leukemia.  That means it is almost inevitable that we will develop genetic mutations associated with leukemia as we age, according to the authors investigating the earliest stages of cancer development used an exquisitely sensitive sequencing […]
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2:45 PM | HECA School Bus Filtration System Reduces Pollutants 88 Percent
An on-board air filtration system called  high-efficiency cabin air, or HECA, developed specifically for school buses reduced exposure to vehicular pollutants by up to 88 percent, according to a new paper. study by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. The HECA system could help protect the 25 million American children who commute on school buses nearly every day, according to the authors from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Children are more susceptible […]
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2:45 PM | Science Is Changing - And Sharply Segregated Expertise Is Obsolete
The world's challenges demand science solutions - and fast - but it doesn't need the old style of detached experts, write a team of scientists in, ironically, one of America's most prominent and detached corporate science publications; Science magazine, a reputable legacy publication with a politician leading them. Segregated expertise, like segregated articles of taxpayer-funded science, is obsolete.read more
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2:31 PM | Things are about to get really exciting!
Things are about to get really exciting! http://ow.ly/JJJvkFiled under: Uncategorized
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1:30 PM | Stage, Not Age - Knowing Your Child's Reading Ability And How To Help Them
A child's reading progression isn't based on age, so you need to know what stage your child is up to in order to help them. Image credit:  ShutterstockLearning to read is a complicated process and parents often wonder if their child is developing reading abilities at the rate they “should”. Research agrees, however, that reading (and writing) is very much a developmental process, which can look very different for different children, regardless of their age. read more
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1:30 PM | Why Nitrate Supplementation Increases Athletic Performance
Amateur athletes are competitive and they are always looking for an advantage even if it isn't their careers, so it is no surprise that supplement stores are filled with promises of gains.Nitrate supplements, claiming to  improve the efficiency at which muscles use oxygen, have been popular for years, but do they work? A new study says they may increase performance--they decrease the viscosity of blood, aiding in blood flow, while at the same time ensuring that tissue oxygen […]
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1:01 PM | TV & the Scourge of Sound-a-Likes
Have you ever found yourself watching a repeat of something, be it a perennial favourite or a guilty pleasure, only to find that something’s not quite right? You might have seen an episode of How I Met Your Mother (or How I Met Your Late Mother After Falling in Love with my best friend whom I [...] The post TV & the Scourge of Sound-a-Likes appeared first on HeadStuff.
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12:56 PM | Save our bleeding ears | Amy Coats
Over a billion people worldwide are now at risk of hearing loss due to recreational noise. On International Ear Care Day, the World Health Organization warns that it’s up to individuals – and big industry – to create a badly needed changeHearing loss can have a devastating effect on your life. It can damage your physical and mental health, relationships, education and employment. Exposure to loud sounds can result in temporary or severe hearing loss, and often leads to […]
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12:00 PM | Mike Adams attacks Jimmy Kimmel for “hate speech”
The last couple of days have been unrelentingly serious and depressing, with posts on the (probably) preventable death of a young Australian woman named Jess Ainscough of a rare cancer because she made the mistake of choosing the quackery that is the Gerson protocol rather than conventional medicine. Unfortunately, the “natural health community” will almost…
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10:20 AM | Recent Results From Super-Kamiokande
(The XVIth edition of "Neutrino Telescopes" is going on in Venice this week. The writeup below is from a talk by M.Nakahata at the morning session today. For more on the conference and the results shown and discussed there, see the conference blog.) read more
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9:00 AM | Abstruse Goose: Technical Assistance
I’ve just been through several bouts of technical assistance and I have to say that 1) the ESL problem still exists but is much better than it used to be; and 2) a new sentence in their checklist is “Why yes, we can fix that;” 3) the last one thanked me for being such a […]
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9:00 AM | The Showreel | 15 [Feat. The Divergent Series: Insurgent]
Our weekly look at the latest news and trailers from the world of film, featuring some Bruce Lee, a teen insurgent and 5 films to make your week… It’s The Showreel! Film News Whiplash – The Short Version Whiplash was a huge critical success around the world and picked up numerous award wins and nominations, [...] The post The Showreel | 15 [Feat. The Divergent Series: Insurgent] appeared first on HeadStuff.
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8:36 AM | Genetically-modified mice resistant to frostbite
The chilling spectre of winter has fallen upon those of us in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, and we humans are fortunate enough to have a number of ways of coping with the cold. But for creatures that don’t have electric heaters, hot chocolate and fleece onesies, there are many ways to survive…

Heisig, M., Mattessich, S., Rembisz, A., Acar, A., Shapiro, M., Booth, C., Neelakanta, G. & Fikrig, E. (2015). Frostbite Protection in Mice Expressing an Antifreeze Glycoprotein, PLOS ONE, 10 (2) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0116562

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7:58 AM | Saving Energy: Increasing Oil Flow In The Keystone Pipeline With Electric Fields
Researchers have shown that a strong electric field applied to a section of the Keystone pipeline can smooth oil flow and yield significant pump energy savings. Traditionally, pipeline oil is heated over several miles in order to reduce the oil's thickness (which is also known as viscosity), but this requires a large amount of energy and counter-productively increases turbulence within the flow. In 2006 Rongjia Tao of Temple University in Pennsylvania proposed a more efficient way of improving […]
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7:58 AM | New Compounds Protect Nervous System From Structural Damage Of MS
A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the brain and spinal cord, where for unknown reasons, the body's immune system begins an inflammatory attack against myelin, the protective nerve coating that surrounds nerve fibers. Once myelin is stripped from these fibers, the […]
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6:39 AM | Teachers gain health by gaining knowledge
The health of educators is affected by how much they learn at the schools where they teach.
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6:26 AM | Breakthrough in display technology
Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), which are made from carbon-containing materials, have the potential to revolutionize future display technologies, making low-power displays so thin they'll wrap or fold around other structures, for instance. Conventional LCD displays must be backlit by either fluorescent light bulbs or conventional LEDs whereas OLEDs don't require back lighting. Subject:  Technology
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6:16 AM | Why robots will be the biggest job creators ever
As robots increasingly adopt human qualities, including those that allow them to replace actual human labor, economists are starting to worry. As the Wall Street Journal reported last week, some “wonder if automation technology is near a tipping point, when machines finally master traits that have kept human workers irreplaceable.” Subject:  Robotics
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