Posts

October 20, 2014

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5:48 PM | Manly Men And Feminine Women Are Not Evolutionary Mandates - They Are Urban Ones
It is often believed that masculine men and more feminine women were prized in ancient societies and that modern culture is beyond gender simplifications, but a team of psychologists, anthropologists and biologists that surveyed 12 populations around the world, from the primitive to the highly developed, find that isn't so.read more
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5:30 PM | Autocatalytic Network: A Step Closer To Creating Artificial Living Systems
How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions have always occupied philosophers and scientists interested in the origin of life, and they impact technology of the future also. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life - we can also revolutionize the future of technology. Protocells are the simplest, most primitive living systems, you can think of. The oldest ancestor of life on Earth was a protocell, and when we see, […]
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5:13 PM | New Tractor Beam Can Repel And Attract
A long-distance optical tractor beam can move tiny particles - one fifth of a millimeter in diameter - a distance of up to 20 centimeters, which is almost 100 times further than previous experiments. The hollow laser beam is bright around the edges and dark in its center and it can be used to attract or repel objects. Get ready to control the weather or capture an X-Wing fighter in space - if it's really close, that is. Dr. Vladlen Shvedov (L) and Dr. Cyril Hnatovsky adjust the hollow laser […]
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5:07 PM | Should sentient machines have human rights?
Bina48 is a robotic head that looks and speaks like a person—it moves its lips and runs conversational software. Although the robot isn’t alive, it’s hard to say there is no life at all in Bina48. In conversation, it sometimes says surprising things. Google’s director of engineering, Ray Kurzweil, says it’s “wonderfully suggestive” of a time when computers really will think and feel. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence […]
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4:33 PM | Fairness May Be Built Into The Brain - But Fairness Doesn't Mean Equal Income
Is fairness built into the brain? According to a new Norwegian brain paper, people appreciate fairness - but fairness is not that everybody gets the same income, which is sure to concern those who believe all money should be distributed equally. Economists from the Norwegian School of Economics and brain researchers from the University of Bergen decided to try and assess the relationship between fairness, equality, work and money: how brains react to how income is distributed. The team looked […]
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4:28 PM | currentsinbiology: These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a...
currentsinbiology: These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria. A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D […]
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3:55 PM | A camera and quantum physics could improve phone security
Smartphones nowdays can be used in loads of different ways: we can use them to transfer cash, upload information to social media and, very occasionally, actually use them to converse with other humans. Your phone can say a lot about you – the type of phone you have and the way you personalise it can…

Sanguinetti, B., Martin, A., Zbinden, H. & Gisin, N. (2014). Quantum Random Number Generation on a Mobile Phone, Physical Review X, 4 (3) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031056

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3:55 PM | NEW VIDEO! How To See Time Travel In this week’s...
NEW VIDEO! How To See Time Travel In this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart, I’ll show you how to build your own cosmic particle detector and witness time travel with your very own eyes! Earth is under constant bombardment from cosmic radiation. There’s sunlight, of course, but that’s the good stuff. Solar wind, the next most common variety, is mostly blocked by Earth’s magnetic field and diverted to the poles. But there are other, more distant sources of charged […]
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3:45 PM | Brain activity provides evidence for internal 'calorie counter'
As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, you may be thinking about how each food will taste and whether it's nutritious, or you may be trying to decide what you're in the mood for. A new neuroimaging study suggests that while you're thinking all these things, an internal calorie counter of sorts is also evaluating each food based on its caloric density. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological […]
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3:33 PM | Aspirin, Anti-Inflammatory Medicine, Benefits Schizophrenia Treatment
Anti-inflammatory medicines such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments, according to results announced at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin. Doctors have long believed that helping the immune system may benefit the treatment of schizophrenia, but until now there has been no conclusive evidence that this would be effective. Now a group of researchers at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands has […]
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3:26 PM | Pacific Islanders In Canoes Blockade A Coal Export Terminal in Australia
Last Monday (10/13), at the opening of a new mine in Queensland, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said, “Let’s have no demonization of coal. Coal is good for humanity, coal is good for prosperity, coal is an essential part of our economic future, here in Australia, and right around the world… Coal is essential for the prosperity of the world.” The comments immediately sparked outrage from the environmental community, who were already […]
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2:36 PM | Facial recognition is possible even if part of the face is covered
The need to accurately identify people is important for security (and for not embarrassing yourself by hugging strangers). It was cited as the main reason for excluding and restricting the movements of individuals wearing religious head and face coverings in public spaces. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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2:33 PM | How drugs are named can cause more problems than they solve
motionmedication.comSeveral of the most popular posts on SNfW over the past weeks are about how humans perceive the world around them.  For a writer, this is an ongoing issue.  As we all know, one reader will finish a book and tell you that it's about one thing, the next reader will come away with a different conclusion.Investigators know when they interview witnesses to an event, they will hear different versions of that event even though the witnesses were standing next to each […]
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2:21 PM | Scientists create possible precursor to life
How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life - we can also revolutionize the future of technology. Subject:  Biology & Aging
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2:20 PM | Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?
Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased... Read […]

Gunia BC, Barnes CM & Sah S (2014). The Morality of Larks and Owls: Unethical Behavior Depends on Chronotype as Well as Time of Day., Psychological science, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25287664

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2:19 PM | Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
Laser physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam that is bright around the edges and dark in its centre. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam and moved particles one fifth of a millimetre in diameter a distance of up to 20 centimetres, around 100 times further than previous experiments. Subject:  Technology
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1:46 PM | Thinking Globally about Science
by Rupa R. Ram and Paul Dominic B. Olinares There are many global challenges that have a foundation in science and technology including climate change, resource scarcity, infectious diseases, and international instability from nations in conflict. The role of scientists in resolving these challenges is not always clear. Science diplomacy (SD) is the conversation at […]
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1:45 PM | Ocean heat storage: a particularly lousy policy target
The New York Times, 12 December 2027: After 12 years of debate and negotiation, kicked off in Paris in 2015, world leaders have finally agreed to ditch the goal of limiting global warming to below 2 °C. Instead, they have agreed to the new goal of limiting global ocean heat content to 1024 Joules. The […]
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1:02 PM | The Flash: Towards a Cinema of Super Speed
  Superheroes. They’re everywhere. Long gone are the days of eye rolling that once accompanied the mention of ‘men in tights’ and conjured memories of George Clooney clad in Bat-nipples. Marvel’s cinematic universe is growing rapidly, now under the direction of the House of Mouse. It shows no signs of slowing down with projects planned […] The post The Flash: Towards a Cinema of Super Speed appeared first on HeadStuff.
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12:20 PM | Australia’s Head Of Science And Industry Research (CSIRO) Gets Dippy Over Dowsing
You might be wondering if it’s some kind of joke: He’s interested in the development of technology that would make it easier for farmers to dowse or divine for water on their properties. “I’ve seen people do this with close to 80 per cent accuracy and I’ve no idea how they do it,” he said.… Source: Doubtful News
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12:06 PM | Love, Rosie | review
Love, Rosie is a new film reviewed by professional film reviewer Mark Baldwin. The post Love, Rosie | review appeared first on HeadStuff.
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11:43 AM | Read: The Facts on Chiropractic
This is required reading. Questions and Answers about Chiropractic: The Bottom Line by Sam Homola, a retired chiropractor. Continue reading →
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11:32 AM | Psychiatry Should Switch From Symptom-based Prescriptions To Target-based
Psychology and psychiatry have a big problem - they are trapped in the past. While most areas of medicine have moved beyond symptom-based diagnosis, the mental health community is instead adding new symptom-based diagnoses, and as a result the National Institute of Mental Health has declared that the newest Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders should be considered little more than a glossary of terms. To fix that, psychiatry needs to progress from symptom-based (e.g. […]
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11:32 AM | Get A Heart On: Viagra Is Good Outside The Bedroom Too
Long-term daily use of Viagra can provide protection for the heart at different stages of heart disease, with few side effects, according to a new meta-analysis published in BMC Medicine.  Scientists from the Sapienza University of Rome carried out a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials by searching for articles published between January 2004 and May 2014 to deduce the effectiveness of  Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE5i) in providing cardiac protection, and to find out […]
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10:14 AM | In which scientists behave like rats in a Skinner box
Skinner used the term “schedules of reinforcement” to describe broad categories of reward patterns which come to reliably control the behavior of his experimental animals. For instance, when he rewarded rats for pressing a lever at a given interval after […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
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10:00 AM | Paul Dirac: The Quiet Genius Died 30 Years Ago
He is considered to be an important founding father of modern quantum physics, his books are still standard reference works, and many people have heard of one of the technical terms named after him. But who is the person behind these terms – who was Paul Dirac? First of all, he was one of the […]
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10:00 AM | New Director of Research to boost our research
New Director of Research to boost our research 20 October 2014 We've appointed leading pharma industry expert Dr Arthur Roach as our new Director of Research and Development. This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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9:54 AM | Danger is Everywhere | review by Isabelle, aged 7
My dad bought me this book, Danger is Everywhere, and I read it in a day when I was taking a break from the fourth Harry Potter. Dr Noel Zone is a dangerologist. He made this word up. He made up loads of other words too…  Like pianowarus. He tells you stuff like how to know […] The post Danger is Everywhere | review by Isabelle, aged 7 appeared first on HeadStuff.
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9:47 AM | Raw and Uncut 4: The Glow-Worm
Jean Henri Fabre (1823-1915) is considered by many to be the father of modern entomology. Last week I came across an English translation of his “Souvenirs Entomologiques” a series of texts on insects and arachnids. The translation is called “Fabre’s Book of Insects” and was done by Mrs. Rodolph Stawell in 1926.
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8:00 AM | Guest Post: Affair of the Heart: III. Facing Reality, Finally
This is the third post in Affair of the Heart, a series that takes place at the intersection of a highly-experienced science writer and the medical system. by Colin Norman When my aortic aneurysm could no longer be ignored,  and my cardiologist recommended a consultation with a specialist, I finally began to act like a science journalist. […]
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