Posts

September 11, 2014

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10:14 PM | Alien Life Search Guidelines Released
Astronomers searching the atmospheres of alien planets for gases that might be produced by life, such as oxygen, ozone, or methane, may be missing the mark - because those gases can be produced non-biologically. Methane is a carbon atom bound to four hydrogen atoms. On Earth, much of it is produced biologically - burping cows are a classic example - but it can also be made inorganically; for example, volcanoes at the bottom of the ocean can release the gas after it is produced by […]
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10:04 PM | The iPhone: A Film Studio in Your Pocket
One of the biggest misconceptions I encounter about video-making is the belief that one needs special equipment (expensive cameras and microphones), a film studio, and special training to make a quality video. That was perhaps true in the past, but … Continue reading →
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10:01 PM | Which Patients Are Most Likely To Delay Hospice Enrollment?
Almost 20 percent cancer patients wait to enroll in Hospice until their last three days of life.  Their courage and determination is admirable, Hospice is palliative care, but it shortchanges both patients and their families and a new paper seeks to create a profile for people like to be late admissions. The team examined de-identified data from electronic medical records of 64,264 patients in 12 hospices in the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness […]
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9:45 PM | Mapping 15 Years Of Carbon Dioxide Emissions
There hasn't been a lot of progress made on greenhouse gas emissions policies - while America and the EU have made efforts to curb emissions, three countries that account for 3X the emissions of the US are exempt from treaties under an umbrella of developing nation status. And neither policy makers nor the public trusts climate science the way they do other fields. What the world needs is globally consistent, independent emissions assessments - and a lot less self-reporting, errors and lack of […]
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9:30 PM | B1 Deficit Linked To Brain Damage
Thiamine - vitamin B1 - can potentially cause a fatal brain disorder called Wernicke encephalopathy. Wernicke encephalopathy typically occurs in people who have disorders such as alcoholism and anorexia that lead to malnourishment and is an example of the wide range of brain diseases called encephalopathies that are caused by metabolic disorders and toxic substances Symptoms can include confusion, hallucinations, coma, loss of muscle coordination and vision problems such as double vision and […]
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9:02 PM | Male Scientists Forsake Careers For Family - Or The Other Way Around
Though perception is that academia is harder on women when it comes to career and families, and they need to adopt a more corporate approach to penalize mothers less, it isn't just women; one third of men in academic science scale back their careers to focus on family life, according to surveys.read more
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9:00 PM | Genetic Mutation BRAFV600E Linked To Melanoma Progression
The genetic mutation BRAFV600E secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells and modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression, according to a new paper. Targeting this mutation with Vemurafenib reduces this interaction, and suggests possible new treatment options for melanoma therapy. BRAFV600E is common present in metastatic melanoma. read more
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8:45 PM | Real life pop rocks
Imagine you are just walking around the solid rock under your feet starts to crackle and then POP as pieces fly apart. This doesn’t normally happen. A big chunk of the Sierra Nevada caught fracturing on video | Ars Technica. One interesting way that rocks weather and crumble apart is called “exfoliation.” Like the skin-scrubbing… Source: Doubtful News
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8:37 PM | How salt causes buildings to crumble
Historic stone buildings are tourist magnets. The Jordanian rock city of Petra, the medieval town of Rhodes in the Aegean Sea and the sandstone temples at Luxor, Egypt, for example, attract hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. These cultural assets all have one thing in common: they suffer from weathering caused by salts. These crystallise inside the porous building materials and generate enough force for the stone to break or crumble. The same problem also occurs in concrete […]
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8:30 PM | Burger King Just Introduced An All-Black Burger! Wait…What??
Fast-food giant Burger King just released a pretty strange hamburger in Japan. Burger King’s newest burger sensations, known as the Kuro Pearl and Kuro Diamond (the Pearl with lettuce, tomatoes, and onions added), feature black buns, black sauce, meat with black pepper, and even black cheese. That’s one dark burger! The black color in the bread and cheese comes from bamboo charcoal (charcoal made from bamboo plants), which is popular in […]
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8:27 PM | You should be terrified of superintelligent machines
Not because they might develop the worst human characteristics, but because they’re nothing like humans at all. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence
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8:22 PM | The Endometriosis Burden On Women
Endometriosis often takes a long time to be diagnosed and affects all areas of a woman's life, from sex to emotional wellbeing, from personal relationships to work.  Endometriosis is a chronic, recurring disease that is experienced by approximately 10 per cent of women worldwide. Common symptoms include painful menstruation, heavy menstrual bleeding, painful sex and infertility.read more
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7:58 PM | Bownessie reemerges as a funny dig at Scottish independence
Sometimes, don’t you feel that the media just insults our intelligence? It’s a funny joke that a Scottish monster supposedly visits England during the independence referendum. Scottish independence: now Nessie defects – Telegraph. It seems that it is not just high-street banks, or hardcore unionists, who are looking for the exit door in Scotland should… Source: Doubtful News
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7:55 PM | Science Toy For The Brain
Interactive toy to inspire the next generation of scientists.
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7:36 PM | Spinosaurus: The First Semi-Aquatic Dinosaur
The first truly semi-aquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, has been announced. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment. The fossils also indicate that Spinosaurus was the largest known predatory dinosaur to roam the Earth, measuring more than 9 feet longer than the world's largest Tyrannosaurus rex […]
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6:55 PM | Astronauts May Grow Better Salads On Mars Than On The Moon
Simulated Martian soil supports plant life, but questions about extraterrestrial plant growth remain.
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6:31 PM | Research suggests that age should not be a barrier to deep brain
Research suggests that age should not be a barrier to deep brain stimulation (DBS) with people with Parkinson's. This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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6:29 PM | Game Of Thrones Weather: Winter Is Coming Vs. You Know Nothing, Jon Snow
The seasons are about to change and that means a new round of projections, prognostications, sooth-saying and doomsday forecasts.If you think you know which of those are done by the civilized world and which of those are done by pagan Wildlings, you know nothing about modern climate science and culture.In George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire", a wall separates two very different people - think England and Scotland. South of The Wall, the people of Winterfell are always preparing for the […]
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6:01 PM | Non-coding RNA: Genetic Modification Anti-Science Groups Can't Protest
Modern genetic modification, where biologists cause a plant to express a natural protein taken from another plant that wards off pests, is protested by environmental groups and organic farmers. Organic farmers will spray Bt on their plants, while calling them organic food, yet the same food that expresses Bt naturally, like many plants do, is a Frankenfood. It's the protein expression, they insist. There may be a compromise between the world of science - and not letting poor people die - and […]
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5:01 PM | New Soldier In The Body's Anti-Virus Army Discovered
When it comes to defense against viruses, the immune system has an arsenal of weapons at its disposal, including killer cells, antibodies and messenger molecules, and when a pathogen attacks the body, the immune system usually activates the appropriate mechanisms. read more
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4:30 PM | 25 Percent Of The World's Diabetics Live In China
China has 18 percent of the world's population but 25 percent of its diabetics. When the numbers are a staggering 1.3 billion, such a startling disparity in representation means a major public health crisis. In 1980, less than 1% of Chinese adults had diabetes but with wealth and more food comes more opportunities to eat poorly. Though pre-diabetes is a wholly fabricated condition the evidence-based world wishes epidemiologists would stop talking about, if we do consider that, then 50% of […]
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4:14 PM | People and their pets look alike … and the same goes for their cars
It is common knowledge – at least to anyone who trawls the shallower reaches of the internet – that people resemble their pets. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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4:09 PM | Meet “Cassius”, The Largest Crocodile In Captivity In The World (Photos)
84-year old George Craig is referred to by many as “the-real Crocodile Dundee”. Craig had 17 years of experience hunting and capturing crocodiles in Papua New Guinea before saving Cassius. According to GrindTV… “In 1987, a year after “Crocodile Dundee” hit theaters, George Craig saved Cassius from being hunted down and killed by locals in Northern Territory, Australia, where the saltwater crocodile was terrorizing the population. The huge […]
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4:01 PM | Fat Shaming And Discrimination Don't Lead To Weight Loss
In the UK, where health care is paid for by the government, and in the United States, where health care is increasingly government controlled, fat shaming has become the norm. Since everyone will have to pay for health care, and obese people are more likely to need it, gthe public gets to have a voice in behavior. The federal government has even taken to micromanaging school lunches. But does it work, or is it just a way for elite social authoritarians to assert their superiority over the […]
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4:00 PM | High Protein Diets Linked To Lower Blood Pressure
Forget lettuce, adults who consume a high-protein diet are at a lower risk for developing high blood pressure (HBP), according to a paper in the American Journal of Hypertension. One of three U.S. adults has hypertension and 78.6 million are clinically obese, which is considered a risk factor for the development of hypertension. Because of the strain that it puts on blood vessel walls, high blood pressure is one of the most common risk factors of stroke and an accelerator of multiple forms of […]
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3:51 PM | Is the pattern of brain folding a 'fingerprint' for schizophrenia?
Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human brain is aware that the outside layer, or cortex, of the brain is folded in an intricate pattern of "hills," called gyri, and "valleys," called sulci. It turns out that the patterns of cortical folding are largely consistent across healthy humans, broadly speaking. However, disturbances in cortical folding patterns suggest deeper disturbances in brain structure and function. Subject:  Brain & Behavior […]
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3:50 PM | JCVI: Sustainable Lab / Overview
JCVI: Sustainable Lab / Overview
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3:40 PM | New defense mechanism against viruses discovered
When it comes to defence against viruses, the immune system has an arsenal of weapons at its disposal including killer cells, antibodies and messenger molecules, to name just a few. When a pathogen attacks the body, the immune system usually activates the appropriate mechanisms. However, some of the mechanisms do not have to be triggered; they are continuously active as a standing army. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:36 PM | Charlie Chaplin’s 100 Year Old Tramp
Some movie characters can transcend through time and rightfully claim their place in the pantheon of popular culture and one such character which has achieved this is Charlie Chaplin’s Tramp. One hundred years ago the world was first introduced to this baggy trouser wearing vagrant on February 7, 1914. Chaplin debuted the Tramp in a […] The post Charlie Chaplin’s 100 Year Old Tramp appeared first on HeadStuff.
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3:27 PM | So Apparently Wood Pile Art Is A Thing. And It’s Pretty Amazing (Pictures)
When you think about wood and art, you might think of carving, whittling or some other form of wood sculpting or carpentry. What you probably wouldn’t think of is the cutting, splitting and stacking of lumber itself. Luckily for us, there are some super creative people in this world who see art where others see nothing. And though it may seem like a pretty dull medium for art, lumber can have all sorts of different colors and textures that can be
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