Posts

December 16, 2014

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12:13 PM | DNA-themed Christmas gifts
It’s that time of the year when you are looking for Christmas gifts for the scientist in your life. Have a look at this post on xxpress PCR for some great DNA-themed ideas.
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12:00 PM | Jess Ainscough finally admits her condition is deteriorating
Not being Australian and, for some reason, never having encountered her promotion of “natural health” online before, I first encountered Jessica Ainscough, also known as “The Wellness Warrior” over a year ago when I learned that her mother Sharyn Ainscough had died of breast cancer. Her mother, it turns out, had rejected conventional treatment for…
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12:00 PM | Umbilical Cord Blood: Factors That Impact Cell Viability
When parents choose to bank umbilical cord blood (UCB), they do so with the expectation that this stem cell–rich product will be available to treat conditions like leukemia, lymphoma and anemia, should the need arise. The number of stem cells that persist in each UCB unit is limited, rendering the maintenance of cell viability a critical issue Read the rest of this article The post Umbilical Cord Blood: Factors That Impact Cell Viability appeared first on Accelerating […]
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9:42 AM | The intriguing weaknesses of deep learning and deep neural networks
Deep learning (and neural networks generally) have impressed me a lot for what they can do, but much more so for what they can’t. They seem to be vulnerable to three of the very same strange, deep design limits that seem to constrain the human mind-brain system. The intractability of introspection. The fact that we […]
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9:19 AM | The (plant) science of Christmas
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9:00 AM | Who Gives Press Releases Their Power?
Newsflash — Press releases about medical studies may contain hype. That was the conclusion of a report published last week in the medical journal BMJ. Petroc Sumner, a professor at Cardiff University, compared 462 press releases on medical studies from leading United Kingdom universities in 2011 and found that 33 to 40 percent of the […]
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7:03 AM | Descent into Siberia's mystery crater
No summary available for this post.
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7:03 AM | Descent into Siberia's mystery crater
No summary available for this post.
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7:03 AM | Descent into Siberia's mystery crater
No summary available for this post.
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7:03 AM | Descent into Siberia's mystery crater
No summary available for this post.
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7:03 AM | Descent into Siberia's mystery crater
No summary available for this post.
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6:43 AM | Blue Light Effects on Mental & Physical Health
Hey Guys I have been doing a research report on blue light! Here is a part of it that I thought is quite informative for a blog post and interesting information for us as students. : Click Here to Access  The Effects of Unregulated Blue Light Exposure on Student Learning Since the beginning of industrialization, […]
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6:25 AM | Linkage for mid-December
The number theory behind why you can't have both perfect fifths and perfect octaves on a piano keyboard (with bonus lattice quotient music theory link; G+)Sad news of Rudolf Halin's death (G+)Frankenstein vs The Glider Gun video (G+)Günter Ziegler on Dürer's solid (WP; MF; G+)Nature will make its articles back to 1869 free to share online, for certain values of "free" that you might or might not agree with (G+)Albert Carpenter's polyhedron models (G+)The only complete proof from […]
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6:08 AM | Thoughts about Scientific American Blog Changes
Today, I've been mulling over some of the changes going on within Scientific American's blog network (for a summary of these changes, see Matt Shipman's post here at SciLogs.com). I have many thoughts on the network's new guidelines for bloggers, which I'll probably flesh out in a later post. The public publishing of science blogging guidelines (which until now have been largely unspoken for most blog networks) is relevant to my dissertation research on science […]
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6:08 AM | Thoughts about Scientific American Blog Changes
Today, I've been mulling over some of the changes going on within Scientific American's blog network (for a summary of these changes, see Matt Shipman's post here at SciLogs.com). I have many thoughts on the network's new guidelines for bloggers, which I'll probably flesh out in a later post. The public publishing of science blogging guidelines (which until now have been largely unspoken for most blog networks) is relevant to my dissertation research on science […]
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5:47 AM | Het academische systeem in Amerika versus Nederland: wat we van elkaar kunnen leren (deel 4)
Het begint een beetje een cliché te worden: Nederlandse universiteiten willen en moeten steeds meer op Amerikaanse gaan lijken. Het moet allemaal excellenter, internationaler en sneller net als grote voorbeelden als Harvard, Princeton en Stanford. Maar welke delen van het Amerikaanse universiteitssysteem moeten we dan overnemen en welke liever niet? Ik heb sinds ongeveer een jaar het privilege... Lees meer op www.sciencepalooza.nl
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5:23 AM | Groundbreaking genome sequencings reveal how birds became birds
Scientists have sequenced the genomes of 48 different species of birds. Their findings reveal how birds developed, how all bird species are related, and what
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5:19 AM | Museum space is a part of the display
When you visit a museum the spatial layout and design is more than a neutral backdrop. It is an essential part of the experience.
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4:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 15 December 2014
Montgomery police: Murder suspect thought her victim practiced witchcraft – The Washington Post. Cape Cod Mystery: A Surge of Stranded Turtles – NYTimes.com. Relatively Interesting 2014 Failed and Forgotten Psychic Predictions. Retraction Watch is growing, thanks to a $400,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation Mysterious Giant Creature Leaves Strange ‘Wake’ in Bay Of Islands. —… Source: Doubtful News No related posts.
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4:34 AM | You Mean I Have to Cook?
By Scott Charles Anderson Dining-out is a vice, a dissipation of spirit punished by remorse. We eat, drink and talk a little too much, abuse all our friends, belch out our literary preferences and are egged on by accomplices in … Continue reading → The post You Mean I Have to Cook? appeared first on Notch by Notch.
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4:21 AM | Birds Can Hear… With Their Heads??
I don’t know if you knew this or not, but birds don’t have external ears. Hard to believe, eh? I mean, every time I stomp the ground near them, they go flying away like crazy, and in many hunting videos, a gunshot will scatter them in the direction opposite of the shot. But… they don’t […]
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4:04 AM | NEW VIDEO!!! Why (Some) People Don’t Believe in Climate...
NEW VIDEO!!! Why (Some) People Don’t Believe in Climate Science Despite nearly-unanimous agreement from scientists that climate change is real and humans are causing it, 4 in 10 Americans don’t agree. Why? This week I dig into the psychology and quirks of human evolution that makes climate change such an easy problem for some people to ignore, to disagree with, and put off to the future. Problem is, we don’t have time to waste. We’re running out of time… Climate […]
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2:24 AM | Cells of the century
No summary available for this post.
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2:24 AM | Cells of the century
No summary available for this post.
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2:24 AM | Cells of the century
No summary available for this post.
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2:24 AM | Cells of the century
No summary available for this post.
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2:24 AM | Cells of the century
No summary available for this post.
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12:51 AM | Residents of Former Top Secret Soviet Nuclear Village Suffering From Unknown Sleep Disorder
More than 100 of the 600 residents of Kalachi village in Kazakhastan have experienced a strange “sleep epidemic” at least once in the past few years. According to RT… “Every tenth villager of Kazakhstan’s Kalachi has unexpectedly fallen asleep in broad daylight – some unable to wake up for several days. Despite numerous attempts to find the cause of the inexplicable disorder, the Sleepy Hollow riddle remains unsolved.” In one case, eight […]
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12:30 AM | Retraction Watch awarded a two-year, $400,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation
You might think of it as a website winning a genius grant: Retraction Watch, after more than four years and 2,000 posts, has been awarded a two-year, $400,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation to expand its work with the creation of a comprehensive database of retractions. Such a database does not now exist, and its creation will close "a gap that deprives scholarly publishing of a critical mechanism for self-correction," according to the proposal by Reaction Watch's founders, Ivan Oransky […]
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12:30 AM | Scientific American reshapes blog network, cuts number of blogs and bloggers in half.
Scientific American has rebuilt its blog network to "create an improved balance of topic areas and bring in some new voices," the editors announced Dec. 15th. The move will cut the number of blogs and bloggers roughly in half, said Curtis Brainard, Scientific American's blogs editor. That means that some familiar names will no longer be part of the network. I haven't been able to get a list of the dropped bloggers, but the blogs page now lists farewells from several current bloggers, including […]
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