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Posts

April 15, 2014

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7:43 PM | MiR-25 Shuts Down The Overworked Heart
Cardiovascular disease often causes the heart to work harder than usual, a condition that triggers the chronic buildup of cardiac pressure and the onset of heart failure. A new study now shows that microRNA-25 is a new molecular switch that is activated in the overworked heart to drive the onset of heart failure. Heart failure is the progressive decline in heart’s contractile function, and is commonly caused by a number of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, […]
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7:41 PM | Plant-Derived Nanotubes Provide Personalized DNA Delivery
Tiny tubes deliver functioning genes to cells with broken copies. Originally published:  Apr 15 2014 - 3:30pm By:  Cynthia McKelvey, ISNS Contributor Science category:  Biology News section:  Inside Science News Service Tags:  nanotubes
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7:34 PM | Dust (the zodiacal light) pointing at dust (the Milky Way...
Dust (the zodiacal light) pointing at dust (the Milky Way band) One is the remnants of our solar system’s birth, and the other holds the seeds for solar systems dead and yet to come. Some more dusty goodness to go along with this week’s dusty episode of IOTBS on YouTube. Photo by the superbly talented Cory Schmitz (Flickr, used with permission)
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7:34 PM | For all the cows: The complicated tale of Cliven Bundy
This story of Cliven Bundy and his neighbors against the U.S. Government officials is a hard one to follow. Read through this piece that presents the situation chronologically. Everything you need to know about the long fight between Cliven Bundy and the federal government. In the comments, note that one person mentions that the anti-government… Source: Doubtful News
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7:32 PM | Kids React to WALKMANS (Portable Cassette Players)
Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: tech, video
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7:05 PM | Herding Cells With Electrcity Could Lead To Smart Bandages
Researchers have used an electrical current to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells, an achievement that could establish the basis for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications such as "smart bandages" that use electrical stimulation to help heal wounds.In the experiments, the researchers used single layers of epithelial cells, the type of cells that bind together to form robust sheathes in skin, kidneys, cornea and other organs. They found that by applying […]
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6:53 PM | Puppet Plagiarism - Copycats Are Just Not Cute
Kids know it is wrong to steal stuff - they also seem to know it's wrong to steal an idea. They just discover it a little later.University of Washington psychologist Kristina Olson and colleagues discovered that preschoolers often don't view a copycat negatively but by the age of 5 or 6, they do. It holds true even across cultures that typically view intellectual property rights in different ways, like in Germany where they violate international trademarks and hold a Science 2.0 conference […]
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6:44 PM | Is Weather Affecting Lyme Disease Cases?
CDC officials track how weather changes may increase the number of Lyme disease cases in the U.S. Originally published:  Apr 15 2014 - 2:30pm By:  Karin Heineman, ISTV Executive Producer Science category:  Animals Biology News section:  Inside Science TV […]
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6:40 PM | Breaking Bad Mitochondria
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. The hard-to-kill pathogen, which infects an estimated 200 million people worldwide, attacks the liver cells' energy centers – the mitochondria – dismantling the cell's innate ability to fight infection. It does this by altering cells mitochondrial […]
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6:25 PM | Dust is pretty amazing stuff. Check out more dusty science in...
Dust is pretty amazing stuff. Check out more dusty science in this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart: (Apologies for not including dusts of the pixie, angel, and bowl varieties in the video)
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6:00 PM | Picture of the Week: Practice Eye
In 1800s London, if you needed an optical device—eyeglasses, periscopic spectacles, a microscope—W. & S. Jones was the place to go. Founded by two enterprising brothers, the company specialized in various scientific instruments, like the model eye above. It could be used to demonstrate—at a very basic level—how the eye refracts light.   [photo collegeeye align-left max-width=250]The instrument is an early version of a “practice eye,” a […]
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5:43 PM | Regenerated Esophagus Successfully Transplanted Into Rat
A research team led by Paolo Macchiarini, MD, PhD at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has successfully transplanted a regenerated esophagus into a rat using a bioreactor developed by Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology (HART), a spin-off of Harvard Bioscience. Macchiarini has previously done several successful regenerated trachea transplants in human patients using a HART bioreactor.read more
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5:16 PM | generalelectric: If Earth’s water were drained into a single...
generalelectric: If Earth’s water were drained into a single drop, it would measure about 950 miles in diameter. Roughly three percent is fresh water, and just one-third of that is easily accessible. Meeting the growing need for water is a critical challenge. Many countries rely on desalination to produce fresh water, but current techniques are typically energy-intensive, using enough energy globally to power nearly seven million homes. That’s why today GE is launching an open […]
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5:15 PM | "Evolution happens like a movie, with frames moving by both quickly and gradually, and we often can’t..."
“Evolution happens like a movie, with frames moving by both quickly and gradually, and we often can’t see the change while it’s occurring. Every time we find a fossil, it’s a snapshot back in time, often with thousands of frames missing in between, and we’re forced to reconstruct the whole film. Life is what happens in between the snapshots.” - Joe Hanson explores why there was no first human (via we-are-star-stuff)
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5:12 PM | How To Use Video Effectively to Communicate Science: 10 Tips
A video tip I created is being featured on the Union of Concerned Scientists website this week. They have a great series called “Science Network Tip of the Week”, which features useful suggestions for communicating science effectively. They also provide … Continue reading →
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5:01 PM | How The Odds of You Even Existing Are Basically Zero (Infographic)
A ridiculous number of factors had to come together for you to be born. This infographic quantifies the probability of all of these factors happening. Think about it the next time you’re feeling insignificant or telling yourself that something is “impossible”! Click the image to see the full size version.
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4:37 PM | Eating rice boosts diet quality, reduces body weight and improves markers for health
New research, partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the USA Rice Federation, shows that consumers can improve their diets simply by enjoying white or brown rice as part of their daily meals. In a study published online in the peer-reviewed journal Food and Nutrition Sciences, lead author Theresa Nicklas, DrPH, of Baylor College
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4:14 PM | What Would the Lunar Eclipse Have Looked Like from the Moon?
We who live in North or South America (and had clear skies,) experienced a total eclipse of the Moon Tuesday morning, April 15.  But what would the eclipse have looked like to someone on the Moon?First, since the Moon always keeps one side toward the Earth and one side away from the Earth, we have to pick a side. For this purpose, the interesting side of the Moon is the one that was facing the Earth and the Sun. It was sunny and bright on that side of the Moon before the eclipse began. […]
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4:10 PM | Less Salt Intake Credited With Lower Cardiovascular Disease Deaths
The 15% fall in dietary salt intake, which is implicated in increased blood pressure, over the past decade in England is likely to have had a key role in the 40% drop in deaths from heart disease and stroke over the same period, according to a paper in BMJ Open. Average salt intake across the nation is still far too high, the authors warn, and much greater effort is needed to curb the salt content of the foods we eat.  The authors base their findings on an analysis of data from more than […]
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4:08 PM | Meta-Analysis Supports Whey Protein, Resistance Exercise For Improved Body Composition
 A meta-analysis that included 14 randomized controlled trials with a total of 626 adult participants found that  whey protein, either as a supplement combined with resistance exercise or as part of a weight-loss or weight-maintenance diet, may provide men and women benefits related to body composition. read more
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3:12 PM | Why This Sculpture of Jesus as A Homeless Man Caused A Major Stir In A Wealthy Community
Davidson, North Carolina is an affluent neighborhood where things tend to stay pretty quiet. Recently, however, one seemingly innocuous sculpture sparked quite the controversy in Davidson. The sculpture that started it all is called Jesus the Homeless. It depicts jesus as a homeless man wrapped in a blanket, laying on a park bench. The blanket obscures […]
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3:06 PM | Welcome Peggy: Saturn's Newest Moon?
A small icy object within the rings of Saturn may be a new moon, according to interpretation of images taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013 which show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's A ring -- the outermost of the planet's large, bright rings. One of these disturbances is an arc about 20 percent brighter than its surroundings, 750 miles (1,200 kilometers) long and 6 miles (10 kilometers) wide. Scientists also found unusual protuberances in the usually smooth […]
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2:20 PM | Outgoing Behavior Makes For Happier Humans
PULLMAN, Wash. - Happy is as happy does, apparently—for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves. These findings were among those recently published in the Journal of Research in Personality in a paper by Timothy Church, professor of counseling psychology and associate dean of research in the College of Education at Washington […]
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2:20 PM | Bizarre Parasite May Provide Cuttlefish Clues
University of Adelaide research into parasites of cuttlefish, squid and octopus has uncovered details of the parasites' astonishing life cycles, and shown how they may help in investigating populations of their hosts. Researcher Dr Sarah Catalano has described 10 new parasite species− dicyemid mesozoans −, which live in the kidneys of cephalopods (cuttlefish, squid and octopus). They are the very first dicyemid species to be described from Australian waters. read more
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2:20 PM | Whooping Cough Bacterium Evolves In Australia
The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed in Australia - most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease - with a possible reduced effectiveness of the vaccine as a result, a new study shows. A UNSW-led team of researchers analysed strains of Bordetella pertussis from across Australia and found that many strains no longer produce a key surface protein called pertactin. read more
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2:14 PM | Il est temps de valoriser le journalisme
Il faut davantage de culture scientifique, de vulgarisation, de blogues de science, tout le monde est d’accord là-dessus. Mais il faut aussi plus de journalistes scientifiques et ça, c’est moins évident. Susan Watts, «Society needs more than wonder to respect science», Nature, 9 avril 2014. […]
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2:08 PM | Zijn wij wel ons brein?
Afgelopen week verscheen er in de Volkskrant een column van de hand van een psychiater en voormalig rechter waarin zij beargumenteren dat vrije keuze en menselijke autonomie niet bestaan. Zij beroepen zich daarbij op hersenonderzoek dat aantoont ‘dat wat wij doorgaans aanduiden met mentale processen in feite fysische processen in onze hersenen zijn, die een deterministisch verloop hebben’ en... Lees meer op www.sciencepalooza.nl
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2:00 PM | One year and counting
It’s April 15, which for some of us — and possibly some of you — means a last-ditch effort to file taxes and renew the vow to get on top […] The post One year and counting appeared first on The Science Writers' Handbook.
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12:51 PM | What is the Black Ring of Leamington Spa? A vortex ring
A strange siting over Warwick Castle actually DOES have an explanation that does not signal anything occult or supernatural. Mysterious Black Circle Sighted in the Sky Over Leamington Spa. Weather experts are baffled by the appearance of a black ring in the sky above Leamington Spa on Friday evening. Schoolgirl Georgina Heap was playing tennis… Source: Doubtful News
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12:12 PM | British Medical Journal Study: Your Psych Meds Can Kill You
Sleep aids are a more than < read more
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