Posts

August 16, 2014

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9:15 AM | Frogs that grow tadpoles in their mouths appear not to be territorial
As a field researcher of primarily mammals, I often encounter highly enthusiastic amateur and expert herpetologists at the same sites at which I work. As you would expect, they all conduct their investigations into ‘herps’ in different ways, but one unifying methodology always stands out to me – not for it’s distinctiveness, but because it would be […]
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9:04 AM | Faces – Young Scientist Profile: Marius Zoican
You may already have read his articles on the blog, but today Marius Zoican enters the fray on Faces. In Faces we portray the young scientists of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings and give them an open forum to talk about their research and everything else that is important to them. Everybody should feel encouraged […]
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8:30 AM | ADHD medication enhances the risk of heart problems in children
A new Danish study indicates that children recieving ADHD medication have a higher risk of getting heart problems.
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8:00 AM | The Last Word
August 11-15, 2014 While the Discovery Channel attempted to terrify you with fanciful tales about extinct monster sharks with six-inch-long teeth, LWON focused on smaller, cuddlier, but still deadly beasts. Yes, it’s Snark Week at LWON. “Remember,” Erik says, “just because something is fluffy and adorable doesn’t mean it’s not secretly plotting to kill you in terrible and gruesome ways.” […]
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4:59 AM | Linkage
Some links I've posted over on Google+ over the last couple of weeks (and reposted here, among other reasons, because I don't trust G+ to give me a usable interface for finding all of my old posts there): {7,3,3} Honeycomb, an interesting polyhedral tesselation of hyperbolic space with a fractal boundary (G+) How to distort school rankings in your favor (G+) Some impressive fisheye photography of the heavily patterned interiors of Iranian mosques (G+) A brief history of mazes and labyrinths, […]
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3:23 AM | Asimov’s Three Laws Of Robotics Get A 21st Century Health Care Update
Isaac Asimov's Three Laws Of Robotics, from the story "Runaround" in 1942, are arguably the most famous example of fictional ethics becoming so fundamental they are adopted spontaneously by everyone in an industry that hadn't even been created yet.(1)Now that robots are widely used in caring for older people, as well as in military and industrial applications, scholars want to give them a 21st century update. read more
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12:32 AM | Did You Know… Muhammad Wrote A Letter Guaranteeing the Protection of Christians?
Muhammad, the prophet of Islam, lived from 570-632 AD. Muslims believe that he is the final prophet of the monotheistic Abrahamic tradition, which includes Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus. So although it may come as a shock to many, it’s really not that surprising that Muhammad frequently visited the Christian monks of Saint Catherine’s Monastery on Mt. Sinai in the Sinai peninsula […]
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12:18 AM | My University’s Town Hall on #Ferguson
View the story “My University’s Town Hall on #Ferguson” on StorifyRead more →
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12:15 AM | Cuckoos trick other cuckoos in the race to own the nest
Australian native cuckoos are engaged in an arms race, competing with each other to take over other species’ nests. The finding by Research School of Biology scientists gives new insights into the deceptive habits of cuckoos, which lay their eggs […]test The post Cuckoos trick other cuckoos in the race to own the nest appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:14 AM | Magpies Are Only 3 Percent The Thieves We Think They Are
In European culture, it is widely accepted that magpies (Pica pica) are the thieves of the bird kingdom, attracted to sparkly things and prone to stealing them for their nests. But psychologists at the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (CRAB) at the University of Exeter have analyzed magpies and found that the species is actually frightened of new and unfamiliar objects rather than attracted to them.  The researchers carried out a series of experiments with both a group of magpies […]
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12:01 AM | Taking things on faith
In February 2012, I wrote my first piece as a Tracker for the Knight Science Journalism program. If you know my fascination with all things poisonous, it won’t surprise you to know that it was about heavy metals in lipstick.  I had been recruited by former KSJ director Phil Hilts and I continued working for the Tracker –analyzing science stories, following reporting trends – for a year and a half before becoming overwhelmed by a book project. I am really proud of the work […]
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12:01 AM | Lots of ink for Stardust probe's gatherings from the primeval galactic forge
If one finishes a long highway drive and has to clean splatter off the windshield it is no surprise. But if a little flier's residue is found flattened on the rear window - and the drive included no tornadoes - the thought has to occur: That's gotta've been one fast bug.    Something like that just made big news. Not about bugs, but about space dust that a NASA probe brought back eight years ago by parachute to Utah. It has looped through the solar system for years, its sample paddle […]
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12:01 AM | Reporting on suicide? We should adopt the Robin Williams rule.
Why did Robin Williams commit suicide? Turn to the news, and the answer is easy to find. The money wasn't rolling in any more. Antidepressants killed him. (This from Marlon Wayans.) It was the "seeming link between creativity and mental illness," from Maria Puente at USA Today. The help that he sought failed him. His alimony payments were more than he could bear. The recent news that he had Parkinson's disease was too much. Some news sites reported tweets that said his  daughter drove […]

August 15, 2014

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11:00 PM | New Study Links Zoloft to Childhood Obesity and Diabetes
Zoloft During Pregnancy can Cause Childhood Obesity and Diabetes Researchers have linked the use of Zoloft and other SSRIs during pregnancy to childhood obesity and diabetes. SSRIs are “serotonin reuptake inhibitors.” They are a class of antidepressant drugs. Zoloft is a popular SSRI; Paxil is an example of another popular SSRI. Conducted by researchers at... Read the rest of this entry The post New Study Links Zoloft to Childhood Obesity and Diabetes appeared first on Zoloft […]
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10:30 PM | El mundo según Manuel Castells
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9:30 PM | Gut Bacteria: Now Assuming Control Of Your Brain
It sounds like science fiction, but a new paper in the journal BioEssays  says that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.  The scholars from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded that from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating […]
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9:27 PM | A Look Inside The World’s Most Expensive RV (Video)
Recently an RV sold in Dubai for its asking price of $3.1 million. This hefty price tag put the RV on record as the world’s most expensive RV ever sold. But why would someone pay so much for an RV? Well for starters, the outside of the record-setting RV is covered in gold. Also, the RV […]
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9:20 PM | Open letter to the AAAS about their new journal, Science Advances
The following open letter has been delivered to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and published online in The Winnower. Thanks to Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog) for leading this effort.  Thanks also to everyone who contributed to writing the letter, shared with colleagues, and signed. […]
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9:07 PM | Senior Author, First Author - New Algorithm Sheds Light On Crediting Research Properly
There has always been a bit of good-natured humor when it comes to who gets credit for what in a long line of citations. Occasionally, it can be strange, like when one person who contributed to the I.P.C.C. claims to be a Nobel laureate, but most often there is a pecking order to science papers. This does not keep science humorosts like Jorge Cham at PhDComics.com from cutting to the heart of the matter, as they did on figuring out citations way back in 2005:read more
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8:00 PM | The Molecularium
Our guest picker this week is Lily Bui. First up: There is a nanotechnology theme park online, and admission is free. Welcome to the Molecularium. Lily Bui is a STEM Story Project associate the Public Radio Exchange (PRX), a citizen science editor at SciStarter & Discover Magazine, and an M.S. candidate in MIT’s Comparative Media Studies program. You will likely find her playing the ukulele, tinkering with sensors, or eating burritos. In no particular order.
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7:32 PM | The anatomy of fear and memory formation
Click here if video does not appear on screen.“A huge number of genes and proteins are involved in new memory formation, and we’re trying to get at the basis of that,” says Emory psychiatrist Kerry Ressler. “One of the most powerful ways to study memory formation is through the process of fear-memory formation. And fear memories are also clinically very important because they underlie disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder and phobias.”In the […]
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7:20 PM | Parenting Before Conception: You Aren't Locked Into An Epigenetic Destiny
There's evidence that a child's future health is influenced by more than just their parents' genetic material and can be impacted by environmental factors, but what is being done with that is something of a concern. read more
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7:07 PM | Parrots Over Puerto Rico Just discovered this beautiful...
Parrots Over Puerto Rico Just discovered this beautiful children’s book over at Brain Pickings. It tells the story of an endangered avian species, Puerto Rico’s iguaca parrots. Once abundant, they have been in decline since the first settlers arrived from Europe, another sad victim of Earth’s most invasive species: Homo sapiens. But instead of a tale of doom and gloom, an early obituary for another jewel of nature, this book is a species celebration, […]
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6:31 PM | Answer These Questions To Help Minimize Temperature Threats When Transporting Biobank Samples
Optimal storage temperatures vary from sample to sample. That means as biobanks grow, researchers must cope with increasing complexity surrounding how each sample type/biospecimen is collected, handled, preserved, stored . . . and transported. In theory, it’s easy to see why maintaining optimal temperature during sample transport is critical. Every biobanker knows that swings in Read the rest of this article The post Answer These Questions To Help Minimize Temperature Threats When […]
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6:23 PM | Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Material Mystery In The Milky Way
Astronomers have produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way, which could move science closer to cracking a stardust puzzle nearly a century old.  The researchers say their work demonstrates a new way of uncovering the location and eventually the composition of the interstellar medium—the material found in the vast expanse between star systems within a galaxy.  This material includes dust and gas composed of atoms and molecules that are left […]
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6:00 PM | Dune Discussion Question: Week #4
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6:00 PM | Salad Dressing Science: Emulsions
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6:00 PM | A Savior in Soil
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4:33 PM | How A Thunderstorm Shapes Air Traffic Around the World’s Busiest Airport (GIF)
If you have ever traveled within the United States, chances are that you have probably had a connection that takes you through Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport. The airport has been the busiest in the world since 2005, and currently averages more than 250,000 passengers per day. Though it may seem strange that Atlanta is the center of […]
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4:26 PM | Closing Coal Plant Shines at Salem Poetry Reading
When the coal industry closes a power plant, one of the emotions that arises is nostalgia. This is true even in Massachusetts, a stronghold of environmental sentiment. On a recent Wednesday night, poets read in the control room of Footprint Power’s Salem Harbor Station to commemorate the closing of the … Continue reading The post Closing Coal Plant Shines at Salem Poetry Reading appeared first on EcoJournalist.
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