Posts

August 27, 2014

+
8:00 AM | Things that Smell
My nose has been extra-sensitive lately. I can catch dog food at a hundred paces, both the kitchen and my still-diaper-wearing kids’ bedroom feel like odor minefields, and I have to walk along the lineup of barbecues at the nearby park with my shirt over my face. It’s a good thing I’m not an astronaut. […]
+
7:48 AM | Science is More Creative than Arts
“Science is more Creative than Arts” This was the proposition of the debate that I took part in today as part of CPIT’s Research Month. As you might have guessed I was a member of the affirmative team. It was an interesting experience and very popular – the room we used was filled to capacity. [...]
+
5:35 AM | Planarization by vertex deletion
Another of my Graph Drawing papers is online today: "Planar Induced Subgraphs of Sparse Graphs", arXiv:1408.5939, with Cora Borradaile and her student Pingan Zhu. It's about finding large planar subgraphs in arbitrary graphs; in the version of the problem we study, we want the planar subgraph to be an induced subgraph, so the goal is to find as large a subset of vertices as possible with the property that all edges connecting them can be drawn planarly. Equivalently, we want to delete as few […]
+
5:03 AM | Sunrise Alarm Clock Instructable
Waking up with beeping noises in the morning can be very unpleasant! Here is a way to wake up with “natural light!” Step 1: Real Time Clock The materials needed are: LCD Jumper Wires Arduino Uno Follow this guide of pictures to connect the LCD to the arduino: https://learn.adafruit.com/character-lcds/using-a-character-lcd  After learning several functions of the arduino, […]
+
4:54 AM | The CDC “whistleblower” manufactroversy: Twitter parties and another “bombshell” e-mail
Remember yesterday how, I referenced the ever-awesome bit about the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch in Monty Python and the Holy Grail and how after pulling the pin you must count to three, no more, no less, before lobbing the grenade at thine enemies? The implication was, of course, that I was on my third…
+
4:04 AM | Older mums at increased risk of Caesarean births
Women in their 40s have three times the risk of having an emergency Caesarean section compared to women in their early 20s, a large Norwegian study shows.
+
3:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 26 August 2014
Lots of fun stuff today. Scientology-related Narconon rehab center may have violated law | Tampa Bay Times. Frankenstein exhibition: how the monster changed shape – Telegraph. The Many Voices of Frank’s Box. snopes.com: Fraud at the CDC Uncovered?. Could Bigfoot be in Vicksburg? Nope, almost certainly not. Cracked: 5 Successful People Who Everyone Forgets Are Exposed… Source: Doubtful News
+
2:59 AM | Standard operating procedures exist in our world!
On August 14, 2014, the state of New Hampshire (NH) issued a state of emergency resulting from a series of synthetic cannabinoid-related illnesses. No actual adverse effects were described in Governor Hassan’s press release, but the alleged product was identified as the bubblegum flavor of “Smacked!”. According to reports, starting on August 11, 2014, the product was responsible for adverse effects in at least 41 people across the state of NH. InfectiousChris over at the […]
Editor's Pick
+
2:57 AM | New Evidence that We Live in a Space Bubble
Many people enjoy talking about their neighborhood, and how well they've come to know it. But do you know much about the "neighborhood" that our Sun and its planets hang out in? New evidence from an instrument launched aboard a NASA rocket has confirmed that our cosmic neighborhood really is a big bubble. We have known for some time that our solar system sits inside a region which is emptier than the typical neighborhood in the Milky Way Galaxy. This "Local Bubble" (as it is called) […]
+
2:30 AM | Changes To Bugs In The Gut Could Prevent Food Allergies
Allergic reactions to food have dramatically increased over the past 10 to 20 years. Dan Peled/AAP, CC BYBy Alexandra Miller, The Conversation and Reema Rattan, The ConversationChanging the bacteria in the gut could treat and prevent life-threatening allergies, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) journal today. read more
+
2:03 AM | Dirty politics on the Royal Society fluoride review
In Anti-fluoride activists unhappy about scientific research I related how local anti-fluoride propagandists were busy rubbishing the Royal Society of NZ  fluoride review – even before it was released. Now that it is released (see Health Effects of Water Fluoridation: a Review of … Continue reading →
+
1:11 AM | Marching In Formation Raises Confidence And Changes Mindset
Police in Ferguson have used an ancient tactic.
+
12:15 AM | Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel
An ANU team has successfully replicated one of the crucial steps in photosynthesis, opening the way for biological systems powered by sunlight which could manufacture hydrogen as a fuel. “Water is abundant and so is sunlight. It is an exciting […]test The post Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel appeared first on Australian Science.
+
12:09 AM | The floating cat hoax: How low can paranormal promotion go?
That floating cat video? Yeah, obvious fake. But what is with people who do this on purpose? An Act Of Deception. Recently, a video was posted online showing what appears to be an invisible force picking up a cat. The video was fake. Being one of the first to call him out on that faking,… Source: Doubtful News

August 26, 2014

+
11:30 PM | Married Couples Who Smoke Pot Have Fewer Domestic Violence Incidents
A look at 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence.   The scholars attempted to clarify inconsistent findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples that primarily has been based on cross-sectional data (i.e., data from one point in time). Looking at couples over the first nine years of marriage, the study found: More frequent marijuana use by husbands and wives (two-to-three times per month or […]
+
11:06 PM | Holographic Noise Speculation: Maybe You Are A 2-D Hologram
The Holometer, an experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, has started collecting data but researchers are not going to wait to start their media blitz; they are throwing out  mind-bending speculation, like that perhaps we live in a hologram. Much like characters on a television show would not know that their seemingly 3-D world exists only on a 2-D screen, we could be clueless that our 3-D space is just an illusion. The information about everything in our universe […]
+
10:56 PM | Just How Big Was the Biggest Bird Ever?
25-28 million years ago, a massive seabird known as Pelagornis sandersi dominated the skies. With wingspans reaching up to 24 feet in length, P. sandersi’s wingspan was more than twice as large as the largest living bird capable of flight, the Royal Albatross (which can have a wingspan of up to 11.5 feet). P. sandersi‘s wingspan was also… As big as many World War I fighter jets: Longer than three Yao Mings lined up head to toe: And longer than […]
+
10:42 PM | Who Invented Pointers, Amortized Complexity, And More?
Some algorithmic tricks were first invented in complexity theory Andrey Kolmogorov, Fred Hennie, Richard Stearns, and Walter Savitch are all famous separately; but they have something in common. Read on, and see. Today I wish to discuss some algorithmic tricks and show that they were initially used by complexity theorists, years before they were used […]
+
10:17 PM | Ionic Liquids: Busting Through Biofilm Shatters Defenses Of Serious Skin Infections
Biofilms are the first line of defense for harmful bacteria and make the treatment of skin infections especially difficult because microorganisms protected in a biofilm have antibiotic resistance and recalcitrance to treatment. Biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 percent of total bacterial infections in humans and are 50 to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than simpler bacterial infections.  Biofilms often persist in the periphery of an actual wound, beneath an […]
+
10:04 PM | GOES 14 Rapid Scan images of Hurricane Cristobal
This is the kind of satellite imagery we will see daily when GOES R launches in 2016, and it will be even higher resolution spatially and temporally. GOES 14 is a spare satellite that is turned on and checked out from time to time. It can take one minute rapid scan images. GOES R will be able to do this at two spots simultaneously.   Post by NOAA NWS Weather …
+
9:47 PM | Do social preferences break “I split you chose”?
Hypothesis: Social preferences undermine the fairness, efficiency, and stability of “I cut, you choose” rules. “I cut, you choose” is a method for splitting goods. It is appealing because it is easy to describe mathematically but that that doesn’t stop anyone from using it. It is a clean real world example of a classic Nash […]
+
9:40 PM | Los medios latinos de EEUU pasan de la ciencia
(English intro to Spanish lang post) When I asked my editor at Random House to distribute in the US my two science books in Spanish (for the hispanic population), he answered: “this is a very difficult market. It’s true that there are more than 50 million latinos in the US, but the ones that are interested in Science, they read it in english. Hispanics that prefer to read in spanish are in general not so well educated, and not so interested in science. They buy different types of […]
+
9:40 PM | La ciencia en América Latina es diferente
(English intro to Spanish lang post) In 2011 I was talking about science dissemination with a representative of the peruvian government, and he suddenly told me: “wait a second. Don’t forget that we’re not interested in black holes here”. By “we” he didn’t mean the general population, but the own government. They had many more urgent topics to worry about, like cheap detection of tuberculosis, fisheries in the Amazon, impact of climate change in crops, […]
+
9:40 PM | The Science of the Ice Bucket Challenge
There’s a science angle to many pop culture stories, and in the case of the ice bucket challenge, the science is the most interesting part of the summer fad. The idea, after all, is to raise money for ALS, and since there’s no existing cure for the neurodegenerative disease or even an effective treatment to manage it, the public is assuming that the millions of dollars raised will go into scientific research. So what if it took celebs in wet t-shirts (or naked) to capture the […]
+
9:40 PM | Yearly slug harvest: UC Santa Cruz's newbies strut their stuff
If there is a more successful trade school anywhere that lures bright people away from their budding professional scientific careers and into something that pays less and offers less prestige than being a professor of something too complicated for most people to grasp, I would be surprised. I speak of course of the University of California, Santa Cruz, Science Communication Program.   As we in the biz know, one can make a very nice living from science journalism and related careers. But […]
+
9:30 PM | Composition Of Earth's Mantle Revised
The makeup of the Earth's lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought.read more
+
9:25 PM | Regex crossword puzzle
This showed up at the lab one day. Print it out, give it a try. I have no idea who to credit. If you don’t know what this is, that’s OK. In my opinion, ignorance, in this case, is bliss, but this explains the basic idea. And, if you’re interested, here are more puzzles.
+
9:01 PM | Sorting Cells With Sound
Researchers have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. Separating cells with sound offers a gentler alternative to existing cell-sorting technologies, which require tagging the cells with chemicals or exposing them to stronger mechanical forces that may damage them. Their device, about the size of a dime, could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients' blood, helping doctors predict […]
+
9:00 PM | To trust or not to trust, all in the blink of an eye
We’ve known for a while that having certain facial features will lead people to judge you as either trustworthy or untrustworthy. And in fact our brains make those complex judgments much faster than we could have ever imagined. Now scientists have worked out how we do it. It’s all about physiognomy Back in 1772, Swiss […]
+
8:38 PM | Resilience Management: What The Bubonic Plague Can Teach Us About Ebola
In the 14th century, Venice was in many ways still a world power in its own right. The days when it could topple kingdoms using commerce were behind it, but it was still an important trade destination. In that period, trade meant ports and ports meant the Bubonic Plague in 1347. When it hit, some tried prayer, some tried hunting vampires, but then officials quickly began to utilize what we would now call resilience management: rather than trying to target a poorly understood […]
5678910111213
1,426 Results