Posts

September 14, 2014

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10:00 AM | Blogging for a science magazine
A Q&A What is it like to blog for a science magazine? Is it different from blogging on your own independent WordPress or BlogSpot platform? What's it like to have a blog editor? Do blogs change as they are moved from independent websites to magazine blog networks? These are some of the questions I've been wondering about as I interview science bloggers for my PhD project (#MySciBlog), because science bloggers fill such a variety of roles for a variety of... Read more
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10:00 AM | Blogging for a science magazine
A Q&A What is it like to blog for a science magazine? Is it different from blogging on your own independent WordPress or BlogSpot platform? What's it like to have a blog editor? Do blogs change as they are moved from independent websites to magazine blog networks? These are some of the questions I've been wondering about as I interview science bloggers for my PhD project (#MySciBlog), because science bloggers fill such a variety of roles for a variety of... Read more
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9:52 AM | First map of Rosetta’s comet
Scientists have found that the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko – the target of study for the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission – can be divided into several regions, each characterized by different classes of features. High-resolution images of the comet reveal a unique, multifaceted world. ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived at its destination about a month … Continue reading →
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9:48 AM | Scientists report first semiaquatic dinosaur: Spinosaurus
Scientists today unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment. The fossils … Continue reading →
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9:44 AM | Lurking bright blue star caught: The last piece of a supernova puzzle
Astronomers have found evidence of a hot binary companion star to a yellow supergiant star, which had become a bright supernova. Its existence had been predicted by the team. This finding provides the last link in a chain of observations that have so far supported the team’s theoretical picture for this supernova. “One of the … Continue reading →
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9:09 AM | Mammals may have originated much earlier than thought
Paleontologists have described three new small squirrel-like species that place a poorly understood Mesozoic group of animals firmly in the mammal family tree. The study supports the idea that mammals — an extremely diverse group that includes egg-laying monotremes such as the platypus, marsupials such as the opossum, and placentals like humans and whales — … Continue reading →
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8:53 AM | Mysterious quasar sequence explained
Quasars are supermassive black holes that live at the center of distant massive galaxies. They shine as the most luminous beacons in the sky by rapidly accelerating matter into their gravitationally inescapable centers. New work solves a quasar mystery that astronomers have been puzzling over for decades. It shows that most observed quasar phenomena can … Continue reading →
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8:49 AM | Groundwater tied to human evolution
Our ancient ancestors’ ability to move around and find new sources of groundwater during extremely dry periods in Africa millions of years ago may have been key to their survival and the evolution of the human species, a new study shows. The research — published in the journal PLOS ONE — combines geological evidence from … Continue reading →
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8:47 AM | First evidence for water ice clouds found outside our solar system
A team of scientists has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas giant planets — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune — but have not been seen outside of the planets orbiting our Sun until now. At the … Continue reading →
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8:45 AM | Interactive dark matter could explain Milky Way’s missing satellite galaxies
Scientists believe they have found a way to explain why there are not as many galaxies orbiting the Milky Way as expected. Computer simulations of the formation of our galaxy suggest that there should be many more small galaxies around the Milky Way than are observed through telescopes. This has thrown doubt on the generally … Continue reading →
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8:41 AM | Drivers of rich bird biodiversity in Neotropics identified
New research challenges a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds came to inhabit the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest that extends from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. The study suggests that tropical bird speciation is not directly linked to geological and climate changes, as traditionally … Continue reading →
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8:36 AM | Paleontologists discover new species of titanosaurian dinosaur in Tanzania
Paleontologists have identified a new species of titanosaurian, a member of the large-bodied sauropods that thrived during the final period of the dinosaur age, in Tanzania. Although many fossils of titanosaurians have been discovered around the globe, especially in South America, few have been recovered from the continent of Africa. The new species, named Rukwatitan … Continue reading →
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4:40 AM | High risk of suicide attempts among patients with schizophrenia
One out of two schizophrenia patients has hurt him- or herself or tried to commit suicide. A new study has identified risk factors, and they turn out to be
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12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
Here we are at the end of one more amazing week. It’s Sunday again and we are supposed to review what happened during the last 7 days. For example, have you ever wondered how night shifts could affect you? This […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.

September 13, 2014

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9:57 PM | Bren Hall, East Stairs
Just some test shots with my new travel lens (Canon's 17-40/F4 L, replacing a mysteriously nonfunctional and optically not as good 17-85IS).
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9:51 PM | Paper Dragons Redefine an Ancient Art
Paper cutting as an art form is almost as old as paper itself. Traditionally, though, paper cuts are 2-dimensional, almost cartoonish depictions of scenes because of the nature of the process: either... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:45 PM | Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
New math explains dynamics of fluid systems that mimic many peculiarities of quantum mechanics. The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what’s called the “Copenhagen interpretation” — which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, […]
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9:45 PM | Usurped By Legend: A Review Of Matthew Gavin Frank’s ‘Preparing The Ghost’
When you read something in a book, do you believe it? You might say, “Of course not if it’s fiction,” but well-researched historical or science fiction can offer plenty of accurate information, entertainingly packaged. Nonfiction, on the other hand, might seem true by definition—but what about memoirs? Polemics? Even textbooks tend to be outdated at best, if not outright biased. read more
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9:35 PM | We need to pass legislation on artificial intelligence early and often
Not that long ago, Google announced something unheard of in the auto industry—at least in the part of the auto industry that makes moving cars: a car without a steering wheel or gas and brake pedals. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence
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9:14 PM | Zzzzap!
photo by Edward Aspera Jr. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons Now what happens if I talk to you about circuits? You might think of crackling, zapping electricity, rushing through wires and into bulbs and motors and dooh-dads of all sorts. You might think of AC and DC or christmas lights, or even Frankenstein’s monster. But […]
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8:41 PM | Hornets Built A Nest On This Man’s Window, Giving Him A Sweet View Inside (Video)
Usually, having hornets in, on, or even anywhere near your house is not a very enjoyable situation. But but for one reddit user, the experience was pretty much as good as it gets. A colony of European hornets have built a nest between the two panes of a double-glass window high up in the attic of the person’s house. The window doesn’t open and the nest is isolated in the attic, so the hornets don’t bother the homeowner or the neighbors. The window […]
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8:00 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 12/09/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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8:00 PM | Morsels For The Mind – 12/09/2014
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
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7:53 PM | LTP: When Neurons Make a Long-term Commitment
Originally posted on Knowing Neurons:A few months ago, I got a new smart phone that had a bigger screen and a different operating system. For a while, I was annoyed that I made so many typos when texting and emailing, but now I’m completely competent with my new phone! It even feels strange to…
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5:44 PM | Introducing Apple Watch
Apple Watch is the most personal product Apple has ever made, because it’s the first one designed to be worn. Narrated by Jony Ive, Senior Vice President, Design at Apple.
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5:37 PM | Parched U.S. west using up underground water
A new study finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources. The extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of the western United States than previously thought. Subject:  Earth Science
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5:29 PM | FDA Panels: Conflict Of Interest Vs. Competent Advice
Recently a study was published in the Milbank Quarterly analyzing the voting patterns of FDA Advisory Committee members with apparent conflicts of interest. read more
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5:27 PM | NASA research gives guideline for future alien life search
Astronomers searching the atmospheres of alien worlds for gases that might be produced by life can't rely on the detection of just one type, such as oxygen, ozone, or methane, because in some cases these gases can be produced non-biologically, according to extensive simulations by researchers in the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
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5:00 PM | What’s A Bobcat In 60 Seconds
Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are a mainly nocturnal animal and like most feline are very elusive, so they aren’t often seen by humans. A mammal part of the cat family “Felidae”, bobcats first appeared around 1.8 million years ago.  Bobcats have adapted to thrive in many different habitats, such as forests, swamps, deserts, and even urbanized areas. They inhabitat regions from southern Canada all the way to northern Mexico and can be found all throughout […]
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4:18 PM | 5 Cool Things About Artificial Hearts
Artificial hearts were invented at a time when progress in science couldn't come fast enough. In 1969, when they first went into human use, DDT hadn't been banned, vaccines were considered the medical highlight of the century, and the Green Revolution promoted genetic modification as the way to feed the world's poor in the future.read more
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