Posts

October 16, 2014

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5:31 PM | Lecture Slides: How to do a literature review
Lecture I’m giving tomorrow to first-year STS students. If you want to use it, or any element from it, please contact me in advance.Week 3 Doing a research project step 2_literature reviews
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5:04 PM | Science Left Behind 2014: The Anti-Vaccination Update
Science Left Behind, a book I co-authored in 2012 with Dr. Alex Berezow, covered the ways that anti-science beliefs had become mainstream among political progressives in the United States. It addressed dozens of topics but the three biggest ones denied by progressives (along with a few fellow liberals and Democrats) were the findings that anti-vaccine, anti-biology and anti-energy science positions were overwhelmingly left.read more
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5:01 PM | 'Extreme Altruists' Are Motivated By Gut Instinct
Intuitive processes may underlie decisions of those who help others while risking their own lives. Credit: AAresTT/ShutterstockBy Penny Orbell, The ConversationIf you noticed a person in grave danger would you act first and think later in order to save them? New research suggests people who put their own lives in danger to help others make the decision to do so without a second thought. read more
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4:57 PM | Milky Way ransacks nearby dwarf galaxies
Astronomers have discovered that our nearest galactic neighbors, the dwarf spheroidal galaxies, are devoid of star-forming gas, and that our Milky Way Galaxy is to blame. These new radio observations, which are the highest sensitivity of their kind ever undertaken, reveal that within a well-defined boundary around our Galaxy, dwarf galaxies are completely devoid of … Continue reading →
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4:52 PM | Prehistoric crocodiles’ evolution mirrored in living species
Crocodiles which roamed the world’s seas millions of years ago developed in similar ways to their modern-day relatives, a study has shown. Fresh research into a group of prehistoric marine crocs known as Machimosaurus reveals key details of how and where they lived. Fresh research into a group of prehistoric marine crocs known as Machimosaurus … Continue reading →
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4:48 PM | Earth’s magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime
Earth’s last magnetic reversal took place 786,000 years ago and happened very quickly, in less than 100 years — roughly a human lifetime. The rapid flip, much faster than the thousands of years most geologists thought, comes as new measurements show the planet’s magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster than normal and could drop … Continue reading →
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4:45 PM | Ebola's backstory: How germs jump species
Fruit bats are associated with an array of deadly viruses, including Nipah, Ebola and Marburg. As the bats' habitat shrinks, the odds increase that bats will cross paths with humans, wild primates and other animals.By Carol ClarkFrom Emory MedicineWhile virologists study pathogens like Ebola by zooming in on them with an electron microscope, primate disease ecologist Thomas Gillespie climbs 100-foot trees in the tropical forests of Africa to get the big picture view. He tracks pathogens in the […]
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4:44 PM | Earliest-known lamprey larva fossils unearthed in Inner Mongolia
Few people devote time to pondering the ancient origins of the eel-like lamprey, yet the evolutionary saga of the bloodsucker holds essential clues to the biological roots of humanity. Scientists now have a description of fossilized lamprey larvae that date back to the Lower Cretaceous — at least 125 million years ago. They’re the oldest … Continue reading →
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4:43 PM | Lemurs Like To Make An Informative Visit To The Bathroom
Human bathroom walls contain messages that are wonderfully informative about our modern condition - they can tell you who to call if you have an evolutionary mandate to procreate or even notify you that someone else once peed in the same spot. White-footed sportive lemurs learn a lot about each other due to bathrooms also. Only instead of writing on the walls, they use scent-marks to communicate with their own kind. A study published online in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology by Iris […]
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2:55 PM | braincraft: NEW VIDEO! The Negative Side of Positive Thinking....
braincraft: NEW VIDEO! The Negative Side of Positive Thinking. Because some self-help isn’t all that helpful.  "I’m good enough, I’m smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!"
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2:48 PM | A simple and versatile way to build 3-dimensional materials of the future
Researchers in Japan have developed a novel yet simple technique, called "diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly," to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors. Their study was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. Subject:  Technology
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2:41 PM | Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy?
Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many—even those with seizure disorders—may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), reports that 76% of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65% of patients with epilepsy. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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2:36 PM | Siblings Make Boys Prosocial
In modern culture, boys are often slighted; girls get billions devoted to their welfare while boys are the default excuse for whatever is wrong. Almost every television show that has a tough woman has her disclaiming, 'I grew up in a house full of boys', which is insulting to both girls and boys. And that public relations has worked. Boys in surveys increasingly feel like peer relationships are less valuable. But new surveys show that may be not so; while sisters claim to benefit from having […]
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2:23 PM | This Student Designs Jewelry That Turns Your Veins Into A Power Source (Video)
We’ve all been there: running out of power on your cell-phone with no prospect of a charger in the near future. It’s one of the most frightening possible scenarios for a lot of people these days. Naomi Kizhner, an Israeli graduate student, may have solved that problem. Naomi designs jewelry that harnesses your body’s energy to generate electrical power. Some of her devices are a little bit creepy- they are embedded into the wearer’s veins, and then use the […]
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2:15 PM | Adenosine can melt 'love handles'
The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease. For this reason, many people dream of an efficient method for losing weight. An international team of researchers led by Professor Alexander Pfeifer from the University Hospital Bonn, have now come one step closer to this goal. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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2:09 PM | Protons are forever?
The proton has never been observed to decay into other particles. So it is possible that it is an absolutely stable particle and will never decay. However, there are some grand unified theories that argue that the proton does decay and physicists have been carrying out experiments to detect them decaying. The catch is that these theories predict an extremely long lifetime for the proton, greater than 1031years! How does one do such an experiment? Subject:  […]
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2:04 PM | Protecting connections in brain could halt Parkinson's
Protecting connections in brain could halt Parkinson's 16 October 2014 Researchers at University College London have been looking at the connections between nerve cells – called synapses – to find a new way to tackle Parkinson's. This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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1:56 PM | New Explanation For Earth's Biggest Migration
Sleep hormone melatonin may be linked to daily movements of tiny ocean creatures.
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1:54 PM | Nature Outlook 2014: Medical Research Masterclass (from Lindau)
Nature once again has published a special supplement on occasion of the Lindau Meeting – this time taking you on a trip to the frontiers of medical research. From the basic functions of the cell to cures for HIV and cancer, Nature Outlook: Medical Research Masterclass uses the 2014 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting as a […]
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1:30 PM | Why We Should Make Time For Remembering The Future
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1:00 PM | Would Immunity From Malpractice Reduce 'Defensive Medicine' Costs?
In America, the cost of health care is not high just because the medicine is the best in the world, it is also because of lawsuits. Due to judgments in court cases that have earned tens of millions of dollars for lawyers - one aggressive lawyer demonized hospitals for not doing enough caesarian-sections and earned enough money to become a Senator and then a Vice-Presidential contender in 2004 - hospitals and offices have instituted a 'defense medicine' policy; even if there is no […]
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1:00 PM | New Horizons Pluto Mission Gets Potential Kuiper Belt Targets
The Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered three Kuiper Belt objects that the New Horizons spacecraft could potentially visit after doing a fly-by of Pluto in July 2015.The Kuiper Belt is a vast rim of primordial debris encircling our solar system. KBOs belong to a unique class of solar system objects that has never been visited by spacecraft and which contain clues to the origin of our solar system.The Kuiper Belt objects are each about 10 times larger than typical comets, 1 to 2 percent of the […]
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12:48 PM | SciStarter among 18 winners of Knight Prototype Fund!
  The Knight Foundation today announced the latest winners of its Knight Prototype Fund. Eighteen projects will receive $35,000 to help them bring their concepts closer to fruition and one of the 18 projects is ours: SciStarter ’s project will connect data journalists … Continue reading »The post SciStarter among 18 winners of Knight Prototype Fund! appeared first on CitizenSci.
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12:40 PM | Update: Discoverer of 'Alzheimer's in a dish' was a cheerleader for a study that failed.
Yesterday, I posted on a story in The New York Times by Gina Kolata that contained more superlative adjectives than you can find in some of the most overheated advertising copy. The story reported on a way to create a version of Alzheimer's disease by growing neurons in a laboratory dish, a potentially important advance for the screening of possible drug treatments. But in Kolata's hands, it became "a giant step forward," "a real game-changer," "a paradigm shifter," and a "tour de force." She […]
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12:30 PM | Insects Also Prize Good Leadership
Not every human can be a great leader but not everyone is made to follow either. This has been shown to apply to elsewhere in the animal kingdom as well: insect larvae follow a leader to forage for food, both leaders and followers benefit, growing much faster than if they are in a group of only leaders or only followers, according to a new study. The research looked at larvae of the iconic Australian steel-blue sawfly Perga affinis often known as 'spitfires'. Sawfly larvae can grow to 7 […]
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12:30 PM | Warm Oceans Had Less Oxygen, Show Microfossils
By pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology, the study of tiny fossilized organisms, researchers believe they can decipher how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago.   The work revolves around the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a well-studied analogue for modern climate warming. Documenting the expansion of OMZs during the PETM is difficult because of the lack of a sensitive, widely applicable indicator of dissolved […]
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12:05 PM | Science Blogging for Institutions: Your Virtual Roundup of the ScienceWriters2014 #OrgBlog Session
Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Rachel Ewing, a science and health news officer at Drexel University. Ewing is the organizer and moderator of a session called “Science Blogging for Institutions: How to Make Your #OrgBlog the Best it Can Be” at the National Association of Science Writers annual conference. This weekend at the National Association of Science Writers meeting in Columbus, OH, we’re going to talk about a topic that may be familiar to readers of […]
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12:05 PM | Science Blogging for Institutions: Your Virtual Roundup of the ScienceWriters2014 #OrgBlog Session
Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Rachel Ewing, a science and health news officer at Drexel University. Ewing is the organizer and moderator of a session called “Science Blogging for Institutions: How to Make Your #OrgBlog the Best it Can Be” at the National Association of Science Writers annual conference. This weekend at the National Association of Science Writers meeting in Columbus, OH, we’re going to talk about a topic that may be familiar to readers of […]
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12:00 PM | Psoriasis And Hypertension Correlated
Patients with severe psoriasis are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, according to a cross-sectional study using information collected from a medical records database, which the authors say provides further evidence of a strong link between psoriasis and hypertension. read more
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11:56 AM | One Year In Research, Part I: Giving Birth to a Research Project
I have now been at the Department of Science and Technology Studies at University College London for one year.  This is a length of time which traditionally provokes retrospection, so I’m going to do a couple of posts reflecting on … Continue reading →
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