Posts

April 14, 2015

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4:00 PM | How To Make Boxing Safer
The tragic death recently of a young Queensland boxer raised the question of safety in the sport and whether boxing should be banned.Claims that boxing is safer than a number of very popular and well-accepted sports warrant careful scrutiny as they often derive from overly simplistic analyses.The risks associated with boxing should never be trivialized, but science and technology could possibly help to mitigate them. read more
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3:50 PM | Creating dinosaurs: why Jurassic World could never work
When the first Jurassic Park movie hit the silver screens in 1993, I cried. Never before had dinosaurs, those magnificent creatures of bygone days, been brought to life so realistically. It was a palaeontologist’s dream come true. Jurassic Park and its sequels were huge hits, and dinophiles around the world are now anxiously awaiting the release of the next instalment, Jurassic World on June 12 this year. Subject:  Animal Research
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3:26 PM | #VitaminE deficiency has catastrophic ef
#VitaminE deficiency has catastrophic effects on brain development. What about less than optimal status? http://ow.ly/LB3GiFiled under: Uncategorized
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3:26 PM | #VitaminE deficiency has catastrophic ef
#VitaminE deficiency has catastrophic effects on brain development. What about less than optimal status? http://ow.ly/LB3GiFiled under: Uncategorized
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3:17 PM | Neonicotinoid Pesticides & Bee Colonies
Neonicotinoid pesticides have, not for the first time, been hitting the news over the past few weeks. The commonly used chemicals help keep pests from decimating crops, but have been linked with negative effects on other organisms, in particular bee colonies. This graphic and article take a look at what we know about the neonicotinoids, and […]
Editor's Pick
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3:16 PM | CD Shattering at 170,000FPS!
Gav and Dan present the SLOWEST EVER episode of the slow mo guys by spinning a disc at 23,000RPM and filming it shatter at a whopping 170,000 frames per second.
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3:12 PM | Protecting nature on the fly
Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its ecological condition is also necessary. Since Nature protection areas already cover almost one fifth of the surface of the European Union, it is impossible to inspect such a vast area in the traditional way on foot. Therefore, new methods are being developed to monitor Europe's nature protection areas from the air. Subject:  Biology & Aging
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3:06 PM | Science shows there is more to a Rembrandt than meets the eye
Research team compares various imaging methods to study how the Dutch master planned, changed artwork. Subject:  Technology
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3:04 PM | OEH - Hormone Receptor That Allows Mosquitoes To Reproduce Found
 By identifying and comparing the sequences of more than 400 receptors in the genomes of two fruit flies and three mosquito species, entomologists have unlocked one of the hormonal mechanisms that allow mosquitoes to produce eggs. They identified a single gene for a receptor with an unknown function within the species distribution.  read more
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3:01 PM | Recruiting the entire immune system to attack cancer
Stimulating both major branches of the immune system halts tumor growth more effectively. The human immune system is poised to spring into action at the first sign of a foreign invader, but it often fails to eliminate tumors that arise from the body’s own cells. Cancer biologists hope to harness that untapped power using an approach known as cancer immunotherapy. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:00 PM | 'Warm Blob' In Pacific Ocean Linked To Weird Weather
The one common element in recent American weather has been its diversity. The West Coast has been drier than usual while the East Coast has had more snow. Fish are swimming into new waters and so hungry seals that don't follow them aare washing up on California beaches.  A long-lived patch of warm water off the West Coast, about 1 to 4 degrees Celsius (2 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal, is part of what's wreaking much of this mayhem, according to two papers Geophysical Research […]
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2:52 PM | Why some people hear color, taste sounds
Source: ucsdnews.ucsd.eduFunctional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of the undersidesof a synesthete's and a control subject's brains, while viewing a black-and-white letter or number. The color-selective hVR region of the cortexis shown in pink. Brain "activation" is shown in shades of red, orange and yellow, with brighter colors meaning more activity. The brain ofthe synesthete shows activity in the color-selective region, while the brain of the non-synesthete does not. It's […]
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2:22 PM | Genetically Engineered Salmonella For Anti-cancer Therapy
On one side of the political spectrum in America and across a broader swath of Europe, science is controversial - especially genetic engineering. But genetic engineering has been done since humans first deduced they could shape the natural world, if anything it has gotten precise in a way that was never possible before.Now it mean even help fight against cancer - and it may do so using Salmonella, more famous as a bacteria that lives in intestines.read more
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1:36 PM | Antibiotics Is To Politics As Oil Is To Water
This week Hilary Clinton and Marco Rubio announced their candidacies for President of the United States. This puts them alongside Jeb Bush, Scott Walker and I’m not sure who else. One thing all these candidates have in common is that not one of them has mentioned antibiotics – at least as far as I know. Do any of you know anything different?So here we are. Antibiotic resistance is killing a minimum of 23,000 Americans every year according to the CDC. (I think that is a gross […]
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1:00 PM | Electric Car Batteries Down To Around $7,500, Maybe Be Down To $5,000 In 5 Years
The cost of batteries is one of the major hurdles standing in the way of widespread use of electric cars and household solar batteries. By storing surplus energy, batteries allow households to reduce power bought from the electricity grid. Unfortunately, batteries have so far been prohibitively expensive.But research published recently in Nature Climate Change Letters shows battery pack costs may in some cases be as low as US$300 per kilowatt-hour today, and could reach US$200 by 2020. This […]
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12:27 PM | Pope fueling trend to blame the Devil
Great… back to the Dark Ages where we blame personal and social problems on supernatural entities instead of effectively dealing with harsh reality. How is that helpful? ‘Pope Francis effect’ leads to exorcism boom – Telegraph. The “Pope Francis effect” has been credited with encouraging a resurgence in faith among rank-and-file Catholics but it has… Source: Doubtful News Related posts:Exorcism on the rise in Italy Exorcism or inexorable? How […]
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10:35 AM | A “Formula” to Account for Resistance to Scientific Consensus
In some areas of science there is very little resistance to the scientific consensus. Very few people will challenge the consensus that water flows downhill because of gravity or that objects are different colours because they absorb/reflect different wavelengths of light. However in other areas of science, for example – climate change, alternative health treatments, [...]
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10:00 AM | Combatting antiscience denialism and quackery
I spent a nice long weekend in New York at NECSS, which has grown to quite the big skeptical conference since the last time I was there five years ago. The Friday Science-Based Medicine session went quite well and, as far as I could tell, appeared to be well-received; so hopefully we will be doing…
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10:00 AM | Read: Dr. Labos on Natural Health Products (in the National Post)
If the first episode of Dr. Labos’ and my new podcast, The Body of Evidence (also available on iTunes) failed to quench your thirst for knowledge on natural health products, I can now direct you to an article five months in the making that Dr. Labos finally managed to publish in The National Post: “The response in … Continue reading →
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9:37 AM | Fun With A Dobson
It is galaxy season in the northern hemisphere, with Ursa Mayor at the zenith during the night and the Virgo cluster as high as it gets. And if you have ever put your eye on the eyepiece of a large telescope aimed at a far galaxy, you will agree it is quite an experience: you get to see light that traveled for tens or even hundreds of millions of years before reaching your pupil, crossing sizable portions of the universe to make a quite improbable rendez-vous with your […]
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8:21 AM | Nature reviewers endorse hype
In a paper published in Nature Neuroscience now over a year ago, the authors claimed to have found a very surprising feature, which was long thought to be a bug. In my blog post covering the hype in the paper and […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
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8:04 AM | W.A.S. Biodiversity: Hymenoptera of the world 300,000 Specimens W.A.S. Archived.
Hymenoptera of the world300,000 Specimens W.A.S. ArchivedBiogeography (Extract): W.A.S. ViewComplete data WAS-XLS (300,000 Ref.)WAS-Archives.orghttp://www.WAS-Archives.org
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8:00 AM | Redux: Not One More Winter in the Tipi, Honey
This post originally ran July 14, 2011.  NOMWITTH, however, hasn’t changed, not one bit. There are a lot of ways to shrink a carbon footprint. Bike instead of drive. Eat low on the food chain. You know the drill. Where I live, in the boondocks of Colorado, a lot of people — myself included, but […]
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7:44 AM | Climate Denial Disappearing Among TV Weathercasters
A new study by George Mason University shows something that a lot of us who work in broadcast meteorology have noticed- the rapid disappearance of climate change deniers among TV weather casters, and I’m not the only one who has noticed it, because I frequently hear talk about it from colleagues at various conferences. It’s very rare to hear ridiculous pronouncements about climate change from TV weathercasters these days, but it was …
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5:50 AM | Thin Arctic foxes suffer more from industrial pollutants
The Arctic may be a long way from the industrial world, but harmful chemical substances find their way northward and concentrate in animals there. Researchers
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4:30 AM | GoPro Partners Up With 3D Robotics To Make The Ultimate Video-Capturing Drone (Video)
The “3D Robotics Solo” — arguably the best drone ever created with GoPro capabilities — has just hit the markets. According to CNET… “Solo, its controller and optional Solo Gimbal — a motorized three-axis camera stabilizer — is the culmination of a couple years of work and a partnership with GoPro. A partnership that has resulted in a drone with full in-flight camera control and live, low-latency HD streaming straight to mobile […]
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4:25 AM | New study could change the treatment of blood clots
Doctors find new method to treat patients with blood clots in the heart that reduces risk of death by 44 per cent.

April 13, 2015

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10:24 PM | NASA’s Curiosity Rover Has Discovered Liquid Water Below the Surface of Mars
For years, scientists thought that the freezing temperatures and extremely dry climate on Mars made it impossible for liquid water to exist there. Now, all that has changed. New measurements taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover indicate that there is actually liquid water just below the Martian surface. “The evidence so far is that any water would be in the form of permafrost. It’s the first time we’ve had evidence of liquid water there now,” says Andrew […]
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10:10 PM | Methane Storms And Titan's Dune Direction Mystery
Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is one of the most Earthlike places in the solar system. It has a thick, hazy atmosphere and surface rivers, mountains, lakes and dunes, which is why the Cassini-Huygens is studying it. But sometimes new data bring new mysteries, such as the seemingly wind-created sand dunes spotted by Cassini near the moon's equator, and the contrary winds just above.read more
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9:56 PM | Electrolyte Supplements, Salt Pills, Don't Help Endurance Athletes
It's become a popular idea among endurance athletes that salt consumption during competition will help, but a new study finds no evidence that is true.A small kernel of truth is involved in the belief, the authors write in the the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine - that there are sodium losses due to sweat during exercise and our bodies function on a principle of thermoregulation - but then some endurance athletes have taken that to believe they should consume large quantities of salt or […]
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