Posts

October 20, 2014

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9:41 PM | This Beetle Is A Living Mood Ring, Using Switchable Reflectors to Change Color
Meet the Panamanian golden tortoise beetle. Native to South America, the beetles are often found dining on morning glory plants in the mountain town of Cerro Galera, a few miles west of Panama City. Usually, the beetles have a shiny golden appearance. But disturb one, and within two minutes the beetle will completely change color, going from metallic gold to a shade of red.   The method the beetles use to accomplish this drastic color change is very rare in […]
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9:30 PM | Finding Fracking Fluids In The Environment
New geochemical tracers can identify any hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that could have spilled into the environment, according to field tests at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania. read more
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9:25 PM | CDC: Mississippi Leads US In Vaccination Coverage Among Kindergarten Children
State and local vaccination requirements for school entry seek to protect schoolchildren from vaccine-preventable diseases.  But not all parents agree medicine is a good thing and the newest CDC results show what states are leading and what states are lagging in protection for kids.read more
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9:15 PM | Record Warm September Increases Odds that 2014 Will be Hottest on Record
From NOAA. From NOAA. NOAA announced today that both August and September were the hottest globally since reliable instrument records began in the 1880′s. From NOAA: Global Highlights The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for September 2014 was the highest on record for September, at 0.72°C (1.30°F) above the 20th century average of 15.0°C (59.0°F). The global land surface temperature was 0.89°C (1.60°F) above the 20th …
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9:00 PM | Superspreaders: How Disease Propagates In Infected Animals - And Antibiotics Help
Some people infected with pathogens spread their germs to others while remaining symptom-free - a new study may answer why. When researchers in a new study gave oral antibiotics to mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterial cause of food poisoning, a small minority — so called "superspreaders" that had been shedding high numbers of salmonella in their feces for weeks — remained healthy; they were unaffected by either the disease or the antibiotic. The rest of the mice […]
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8:22 PM | Tropical Storm Ana Over Hawaii
At 2 AM local time in Hawaii, Tropical Storm Ana was just below hurricane strength with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center expects it to weaken before it intensifies again. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.6 north and longitude 162.6 west. That puts the center of Ana about 225 miles (360 km) west-southwest of Lihue Hawaii and about 325 miles (525 km) southeast of French Frigate Shoals. Ana is moving toward the west near 9 […]
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8:20 PM | Early Universe's Room Temperature Could Have Supported Life
Habitable planets could have existed 15 million years after the Big Bang.
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8:00 PM | Antibiotic Levels In Farm-Raised Fish Are Safe, But Need Watching
Modern food science has meant a lot fewer people starving, but there has also been an increase in products designed to keep animals and fish healthy, like antibiotics. Antibiotics do not just disappear. Even in trace amounts, over time they can build up in the environment and that gives bacteria another path to developing resistance.read more
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7:44 PM | Draw Your Own 3-D Masterpiece With The “3Doodler” (Video)
The art community is never lacking in creativity or innovation. One new device is getting a lot of attention after turning heads with an impressive Kickstarter campaign last year. Wobble Work’s “3Doodler” is a 3-D pen that actually allows you to create three dimensional artwork using a two dimensional drawing technique. According to 3Doodler’s website… “As 3Doodler draws, it extrudes heated plastic, which quickly cools and solidifies into a strong […]
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7:20 PM | Ashes And Vegetables: The Diet Of Roman Gladiators Was Rather Poor
Ancient Greeks used onions as a performance-enhancing drug. Roman gladiators ate ashes and vegetables. If common-sense does not tell us that there was no ancient civilization with futuristic technology building pyramids, anthropology certainly can.Historic sources claimed referred to gladiators  as "hordearii" ("barley eaters") because they had an inferior diet, heavy in beans and grains, the hallmark of poor status. Even 2,000 years ago people made fun of vegetarians, it seems. Though the […]
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7:00 PM | What's Hiding Under The Clouds Of Venus - Heavy Metal Frost?
The surface of Venus can't be seen from orbit in visible light due to its hot, dense and cloudy atmosphere. Instead, radar has been used by spacecraft to penetrate the clouds and map out the surface – both by reflecting radar off the surface to measure elevation and by looking at the radio emissions of the hot surface. The last spacecraft to map Venus that way was Magellan, two decades ago.  One of the Venusian surprises discovered at that time is that radio waves are reflected […]
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6:30 PM | The Croup: Winning The War Against Human Parainfluenza Virus
Human parainfluenza virus (hPIV) is highly infectious and the leading cause of upper and lower respiratory tract disease in young children, including Croup, which is responsible for thousands of hospitalizations in the developed world, and hundreds of thousands of deaths each year in developing countries. Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics Director Professor Mark von Itzstein said his Group's research findings published in Nature Communications today provide a new direction towards […]
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6:25 PM | New director to boost our Parkinson's research
New director to boost our Parkinson's research We've appointed leading pharmaceutical industry expert Dr Arthur Roach as our new Director of Research and Development. This post has been generated by Page2RSS
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6:00 PM | Picture of the Week: Phytoplankton
No summary available for this post.
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5:48 PM | Manly Men And Feminine Women Are Not Evolutionary Mandates - They Are Urban Ones
It is often believed that masculine men and more feminine women were prized in ancient societies and that modern culture is beyond gender simplifications, but a team of psychologists, anthropologists and biologists that surveyed 12 populations around the world, from the primitive to the highly developed, find that isn't so.read more
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5:30 PM | Autocatalytic Network: A Step Closer To Creating Artificial Living Systems
How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions have always occupied philosophers and scientists interested in the origin of life, and they impact technology of the future also. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life - we can also revolutionize the future of technology. Protocells are the simplest, most primitive living systems, you can think of. The oldest ancestor of life on Earth was a protocell, and when we see, […]
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5:13 PM | New Tractor Beam Can Repel And Attract
A long-distance optical tractor beam can move tiny particles - one fifth of a millimeter in diameter - a distance of up to 20 centimeters, which is almost 100 times further than previous experiments. The hollow laser beam is bright around the edges and dark in its center and it can be used to attract or repel objects. Get ready to control the weather or capture an X-Wing fighter in space - if it's really close, that is. Dr. Vladlen Shvedov (L) and Dr. Cyril Hnatovsky adjust the hollow laser […]
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5:07 PM | Should sentient machines have human rights?
Bina48 is a robotic head that looks and speaks like a person—it moves its lips and runs conversational software. Although the robot isn’t alive, it’s hard to say there is no life at all in Bina48. In conversation, it sometimes says surprising things. Google’s director of engineering, Ray Kurzweil, says it’s “wonderfully suggestive” of a time when computers really will think and feel. Subject:  Artificial Intelligence […]
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4:33 PM | Fairness May Be Built Into The Brain - But Fairness Doesn't Mean Equal Income
Is fairness built into the brain? According to a new Norwegian brain paper, people appreciate fairness - but fairness is not that everybody gets the same income, which is sure to concern those who believe all money should be distributed equally. Economists from the Norwegian School of Economics and brain researchers from the University of Bergen decided to try and assess the relationship between fairness, equality, work and money: how brains react to how income is distributed. The team looked […]
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4:28 PM | currentsinbiology: These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a...
currentsinbiology: These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria. A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D […]
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3:55 PM | A camera and quantum physics could improve phone security
Smartphones nowdays can be used in loads of different ways: we can use them to transfer cash, upload information to social media and, very occasionally, actually use them to converse with other humans. Your phone can say a lot about you – the type of phone you have and the way you personalise it can…

Sanguinetti, B., Martin, A., Zbinden, H. & Gisin, N. (2014). Quantum Random Number Generation on a Mobile Phone, Physical Review X, 4 (3) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031056

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3:55 PM | NEW VIDEO! How To See Time Travel In this week’s...
NEW VIDEO! How To See Time Travel In this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart, I’ll show you how to build your own cosmic particle detector and witness time travel with your very own eyes! Earth is under constant bombardment from cosmic radiation. There’s sunlight, of course, but that’s the good stuff. Solar wind, the next most common variety, is mostly blocked by Earth’s magnetic field and diverted to the poles. But there are other, more distant sources of charged […]
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3:45 PM | Brain activity provides evidence for internal 'calorie counter'
As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, you may be thinking about how each food will taste and whether it's nutritious, or you may be trying to decide what you're in the mood for. A new neuroimaging study suggests that while you're thinking all these things, an internal calorie counter of sorts is also evaluating each food based on its caloric density. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological […]
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3:33 PM | Aspirin, Anti-Inflammatory Medicine, Benefits Schizophrenia Treatment
Anti-inflammatory medicines such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments, according to results announced at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin. Doctors have long believed that helping the immune system may benefit the treatment of schizophrenia, but until now there has been no conclusive evidence that this would be effective. Now a group of researchers at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands has […]
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3:26 PM | Pacific Islanders In Canoes Blockade A Coal Export Terminal in Australia
Last Monday (10/13), at the opening of a new mine in Queensland, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said, “Let’s have no demonization of coal. Coal is good for humanity, coal is good for prosperity, coal is an essential part of our economic future, here in Australia, and right around the world… Coal is essential for the prosperity of the world.” The comments immediately sparked outrage from the environmental community, who were already […]
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2:36 PM | Facial recognition is possible even if part of the face is covered
The need to accurately identify people is important for security (and for not embarrassing yourself by hugging strangers). It was cited as the main reason for excluding and restricting the movements of individuals wearing religious head and face coverings in public spaces. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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2:33 PM | How drugs are named can cause more problems than they solve
motionmedication.comSeveral of the most popular posts on SNfW over the past weeks are about how humans perceive the world around them.  For a writer, this is an ongoing issue.  As we all know, one reader will finish a book and tell you that it's about one thing, the next reader will come away with a different conclusion.Investigators know when they interview witnesses to an event, they will hear different versions of that event even though the witnesses were standing next to each […]
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2:21 PM | Scientists create possible precursor to life
How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life - we can also revolutionize the future of technology. Subject:  Biology & Aging
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2:20 PM | Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?
Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased... Read […]

Gunia BC, Barnes CM & Sah S (2014). The Morality of Larks and Owls: Unethical Behavior Depends on Chronotype as Well as Time of Day., Psychological science, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25287664

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2:19 PM | Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
Laser physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam that is bright around the edges and dark in its centre. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam and moved particles one fifth of a millimetre in diameter a distance of up to 20 centimetres, around 100 times further than previous experiments. Subject:  Technology
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