Posts

August 19, 2014

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4:20 PM | Sciencey Stuff You May Have Missed: Week 33
Digging through the web this week, I uncovered all this geeky goodness. You can find the thousands of links from …Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Happiness Is Being Schizophrenic?
Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness yet some people are as happy as those in good mental health and happier than many, according to a paper in Schizophrenia Research. In a survey of people with the disease, researchers found that 37 percent of patients reported being happy all or most of the time. read more
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4:00 PM | In China, These Men Face A Wage Gap Women Don't
In China, there is no wage disparity for one classification of women but there is pay inequality among similarly classed men, according to a sociology presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association which analyzed economic disparity among obese Chinese adults. What is the classification? Obese people. When men gain weight, they are penalized in wages compared to thinner men. With women, there is no difference.read more
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3:48 PM | The Derivative Of A Number
Are you kidding? Edward Barbeau is now a professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of Toronto. Over the years he has been working to increase the interest in mathematics in general, and enhancing education in particular. He has published several books that are targeted to help both students and teachers see the joys of […]
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3:15 PM | Hypatia Catalog - Solar Neighborhood Is Not A Mixed Salad, It's A Layered One
The Hypatia Catalog is the largest catalog ever produced for stellar compositions and seeks to help in understanding the properties of stars, how they form, and possible connections with orbiting planets. Named after one of the first female astronomers, who lived ~350 A.D. in Alexandria, the digital catalog is a compilation of spectroscopic abundance data from 84 literature sources for 50 elements across 3,058 stars in the solar neighborhood, within 500 light years of the Sun. It essentially […]
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3:00 PM | Enzyme Brake Pads Block Plant Hormone
Researchers trying to get new information about the metabolism of plants can switch off individual genes and study the resulting changes but researchers in a new study adopted a different approach.  Erich Kombrink from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and Markus Kaiser from the University of Duisburg-Essen have identified small molecules that block specific components of the metabolic process like brake pads and prevent the downstream reactions. In their […]
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2:59 PM | Have Strange Baryons Been Found?
Can math be evidence? Not ordinarily, but recent calculations are compelling because they show that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. They just need to be detected. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead are making their presence known by […]
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2:59 PM | This Well-Known Hair Stylist Spends His Day Off Giving Haircuts to the Homeless
Mark Bustos is a hair stylist based in New York City. Currently, Mark works at the swanky Three Squares Studio, which  has been featured in magazines like GQ, Details and Vanity Fair, among others. But on his day off, you won’t find Mark shmoozing with his high-end customers. Rather, you’ll find him walking the streets of […]
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2:48 PM | SfN removes exclusive license requirement for eNeuro
Using the open letter to the AAAS as a template, this last Saturday (August 16), I drafted a letter to the Society for Neuroscience about their new open access journal, eNeuro. As with the AAAS letter, the letter to SfN is open for anyone to read, comment on, or sign. Early in the editing process, […]
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2:29 PM | US Coal Emissions Could Drop 21 Percent While Helping American Industry
American CO2 emissions have plummeted thanks to natural gas and energy emissions from coal have not been this low since the early 1980s, but a decades long war against energy science meant nuclear power - a truly viable emissions-free source - was scuttled and that meant more coal plants starting in the early 1990s, which meant more CO2.read more
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2:28 PM | Butterflies, beetles and banknotes: tuning colour efficiently | Athene Donald
Structural colours are more visible and vivid than those that use pigments as many examples from the natural world demonstrate. But sometimes pure white is what is requiredIn the South American rainforests, a blue flash of colour visible from hundreds of metres away is likely to signify the presence of one of the Morpho genus of butterflies. Although the colours of many animals arise from pigmentation, for Morpho and a range of other insects (including iridescent beetles) the origin of their […]
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2:25 PM | How Water-Cooled Condensers Can Help Biobanks Reduce Energy Consumption
All mechanical freezers work by exchanging heat inside the freezer with the environment outside. The part that actually does the heat exchange is called the condenser. As its name implies, the condenser condenses gaseous coolant into liquid and circulates it back through the system, exchanging heat. Most condensers are air-cooled, meaning they vent excess heat Read the rest of this article The post How Water-Cooled Condensers Can Help Biobanks Reduce Energy Consumption appeared first on […]
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2:22 PM | Expert Witnesses Prepare to Testify in Zoloft Lawsuit
Zoloft Lawsuit News The Zoloft multidistrict litigation – or Zoloft MDL is now in session. U.S. District Judge Cynthia M. Rufe is presiding over the Zoloft MDL which is to be heard in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The Zoloft MDL is a consolidation, or grouping of the hundreds of claims in the Zoloft lawsuit.... Read the rest of this entry The post Expert Witnesses Prepare to Testify in Zoloft Lawsuit appeared first on Zoloft Lawsuit Claims.
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2:12 PM | 3 New Ways To Separate Clostridium Difficile From Good Microbes
The bacterium Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-related diarrhea and is a growing problem in the hospital environment and elsewhere in the community. Understanding how the microbe colonizes the human gut when other "healthy" microbes have been destroyed during a course of antibiotics might lead to new ways to control infection.read more
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2:05 PM | Hangout with Canopy Researcher Margaret Lowman
Margaret Lowman, who also goes by the nickname “Canopy Meg,” is chief of science and sustainability at the California Academy of Sciences. Her research focuses on life and ecosystems at... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:00 PM | Snapshot: A working vacation
This month, I’m starting the third year of my PhD program. In other words, I really need to start turning some of my research into papers. And since I’m apparently […] The post Snapshot: A working vacation appeared first on The Science Writers' Handbook.
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1:42 PM | Faces – Young Scientist Profile: Melissa Lynes
Intelligence+Drive+Creativity=Good Economist according to Melissa Lynes, who is introduced on Faces this time. In Faces we portray the young scientists of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings and give them an open forum to talk about their research and everything else that is important to them. Everybody should feel encouraged to also share their own thoughts […]
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1:32 PM | The Queen of Seaweeds – the story of Amelia Griffiths, an early 19th century pioneer of marine botany.
In 2010, the Royal Society compiled a list of the ten most influential female scientists in British History. One of the ten was Mary Anning (1799-1847) who from humble beginnings in Lyme Regis, Dorset came to be recognised as the “greatest fossil hunter ever known”. Her discoveries of long extinct, fossilised creatures in the cliffs […]
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1:11 PM | Stand-up Comedy – three years later…
I sink the dregs of my second pint that night and rub my hands together. Stressing the palms as I try to remember what I’m supposed to say. None of it’s coming back to me. Not a single word. Any word would do. The first word would be best. If I could just remember the […] The post Stand-up Comedy – three years later… appeared first on HeadStuff.
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1:04 PM | Science Communication Quotations
“Even for the physicist, the description in plain language will be a criterion of the degree of understanding that has been reached.” - Werner Heisenberg “One way to find out if you have succeeded (in writing clearly) is to show your … Continue reading → The post Science Communication Quotations appeared first on Plain Language Science.
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12:13 PM | More than just X and Y: New genetic basis for sex determination
Men and women differ in obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants. But scientists have found that a subset of very small genes encoding short …
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12:09 PM | Fascinating rhythm: Light pulses illuminate a rare black hole
Astronomers have accurately measured – and thus confirmed the existence of – a rare intermediate-mass black hole about 400 times the mass of our sun in a galaxy 12 million light years from the Milky Way. The finding uses a technique never applied in this way before, and opens the door to new studies of …
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12:04 PM | 8,000-year-old mutation key to human life at high altitudes: Study identifies genetic basis for Tibetan adaptation
In an environment where others struggle to survive, Tibetans thrive in the thin air of the Tibetan Plateau, with an average elevation of 14,800 feet. A new study is the first to find a genetic cause for the adaptation and demonstrate how it contributes to the Tibetans’ ability to live in low oxygen conditions. “These …
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12:01 PM | Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest
The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers. But all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought. “I’m interested in how rainforest hunter-gatherers have adapted to their very …
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12:00 PM | Rubber Made From DANDELIONS! Episode 65 by Meredith Hanel (Click...
Rubber Made From DANDELIONS! Episode 65 by Meredith Hanel (Click here to directly access the MP3) (Access the full text transcript) In suburban North America, dandelions are nothing but an annoying weed to be extracted from lawns. The dandelion may soon rise from its lowly status, because of something valuable in its roots – rubber. We use natural rubber from the rubber tree for many things from tires to birthday balloons. Dandelion rubber car tires and dandelion latex products may be in […]
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11:58 AM | New species of flying pterosaur: Bones from nearly 50 ancient flying reptiles discovered
Scientists discovered the bones of nearly 50 winged reptiles from a new species, Caiuajara dobruskii, that lived during the Cretaceous in southern Brazil. The authors discovered the bones in a pterosaur bone bed in rocks from the Cretaceous period. They belonged to individuals ranging from young to adult, with wing spans ranging from 0.65-2.35m, allowing …
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11:56 AM | New Milky Way maps help solve stubborn interstellar material mystery
An international team of sky scholars has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century. The maps and an accompanying journal article appear in the Aug. 15 issue of the …
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11:49 AM | How early black holes could have grown to billions of times the mass of our sun
A new model shows how early black holes could have grown to billions of times the mass of our sun. These giant bodies — quasars — feed on interstellar gas, swallowing large quantities of it non-stop. Thus they reveal their existence: The light that is emitted by the gas as it is sucked in and …
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10:49 AM | Electric Picnic 2014 | 14 | Foals
It’s been almost a year and a half since Holy Fire was released but Foals are still on the tip of the industry’s tongue. Having released three impressive UK top ten studio albums since their formation, their sound has established a unique benchmark to which current indie rock groups hold themselves. The live element of […] The post Electric Picnic 2014 | 14 | Foals appeared first on HeadStuff.
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10:07 AM | The amazing world of flyingfish by Steve Howell – review
SUMMARY: Written by a professional pelagic birding tour guide and photographer, this book presents a popular account of what is known about the enigmatic flyingfishes, and it’s illustrated with an abundance of breathtaking full-colour photographs. After browsing through shelves and shelves of field guides in a typical nature bookshop, you might suspect there’s a field guide for absolutely every group of anything you can find on the planet -- birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, […]
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