Posts

April 29, 2015

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6:47 PM | Translational Findings: How fruit flies are helping us find cures for cancer
At universities and companies around the world, scientists are studying the mechanisms of cancer and tumors using fruit flies. They hope to identify failures in the genes that lead to cancer, and develop treatments to prevent or reverse these problems. Because approximately 60% of the genes associated with human cancers are shared with fruit flies, […]

Vidal M. (2006). Drosophila models for cancer research, Current Opinion in Genetics , 16 (1) 10-16. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gde.2005.12.004

Miles W.O. & J. A. Walker (2011). Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila, Disease Models , 4 (6) 753-761. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dmm.006908

Ntziachristos P., Julien Sage & Iannis Aifantis (2014). From Fly Wings to Targeted Cancer Therapies: A Centennial for Notch Signaling, Cancer Cell, 25 (3) 318-334. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.02.018

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6:34 PM | High-Speed Camera - 1 Trillion Frames Per Second
When a crystal lattice is excited by a laser pulse, waves of jostling atoms can travel through the material at about 28,000 miles/second, close to one sixth the speed of light. Now researchers can take movies of such superfast movement.STAMP - Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography -  is a new high-speed camera that can record events at a rate of more than 1-trillion-frames-per-second, 1000X faster than conventional high-speed cameras. read more
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6:25 PM | Placebo Marketing And Why Cheap Wine Can Taste Great
When consumers taste cheap wine and rate it highly because under the belief it is expensive, is it just a placebo or has belief actually changed their brain function, causing them to experience the cheap wine in the same physical way as the expensive wine? People enjoy identical products such as wine or chocolate more if they have a higher price tag so a new study examined the neural and psychological processes required for such marketing placebo effects to occur. The authors conclude that […]
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6:25 PM | Was Lucy smaller than her male counterparts?
Lucy and other members of the early hominid species Australopithecus afarensis probably were similar to humans in the size difference between males and females, according to researchers from Penn State and Kent State University. Subject:  Anthropology
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6:18 PM | An Inclusive Fitness Twist On How Spite Came To Be
The occurrence of altruism and spite - helping or harming others at a cost to oneself - depends on similarity not just between two interacting individuals but also to the rest of their neighbors, according to a new model developed by psychologist DB Krupp and mathematician Peter Taylor of Queen's University.Individuals who appear very different from most others in a group will evolve to be altruistic towards similar partners, and only slightly spiteful to those who are dissimilar to them but […]
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6:17 PM | Your Brain Activity Can Predict if You Might Commit a Crime.
Credit: Bob Elbert, Iowa State University Iowa State researchers measured brain activity to better understand cybersecuritythreats and identify what motivates employees to violate company policy.Scientists are making amazing and scary breakthroughs in predicting who may one day commit a criminal act.  In this study, researchers measured the activity in the brains of test subjects when presented with a variety of situations to see if there are measurable activity […]
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6:14 PM | A phone with the ultimate macro feature
If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. Subject:  Technology
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5:54 PM | An Out-of-Control Russian Spacecraft Is Falling Towards Earth (Video)
After blasting off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday, a Russian Progress cargo vessel malfunctioned en route to the International Space Station (ISS). The 7-meter-long spacecraft failed to reach the ISS and is currently spinning while making a slow orbiting free fall towards Earth. Russia’s Progress vessels are used to carry supplies like food, water, and fuel to the space station. This one, the Progress 59, deployed from a Soyuz rocket as scheduled. However, flight […]
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5:39 PM | Spying on your kid’s phone with Teensafe will only undermine trust
There is a growing market in software that can be used by parents to track their child’s mobile phone and internet activity. The Teensafe app, recently launched in Australia, is one such app that has prompted renewed debate around issues such as children’s privacy and parental rights and responsibilities. Subject:  Technology
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5:30 PM | 5 Instagram Tips for Science Artists
I’ve been on Instagram for a long time, with a private account to share family photos with friends. Last year, I decided to start up a second account, @FlyingTrilobite, to share my art in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:30 PM | Target Brown Fat And You Target Obesity
A study has shown a new way that brown fat, a potential obesity-fighting target, is regulated in the body.  In an upcoming Cell Metabolism article,  researchers examined long non-coding RNA (Ribonucleic acid) in adipose (fat) tissue in mice. Long non-coding RNAs have recently become appreciated as important control elements for different biological functions in the body. The team created a catalog of 1,500 long non-coding RNA in mouse adipose tissues - which is the most comprehensive […]
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5:27 PM | Your brain on cocaine
The brain function of people addicted to cocaine is different from that of people who are not addicted and often linked to highly impulsive behavior, according to a new scientific study. The variation in the way that different regions of the brain connect, communicate and function in people addicted to cocaine is an observation uncovered for the first time by a collaborative research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Virginia Commonwealth University. […]
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4:55 PM | Create A Carbon Sink From Your Organic Farm
Agriculture is a breathtaking achievement of modern science. We are on the path to being able to feed the world for the first time in history and the upward trend in obesity is due to the fact that more food has been produced at lower cost with less environmental strain than ever believed realistic. But it still has a price. There are claims that approximately 35% of global greenhouse gases come from agriculture. A new paper argues that regenerative, organic farming, ranching and land use […]
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4:39 PM | Optimized: There Was Nothing Natural About Ancient Clam Beaches And Indigenous People
It's a First World Idyll that ancient indigenous people sustained themselves using nature's bounty, in harmony with the land. Science knows otherwise. Instead, from Alaska to Washington, indigenous people created productive clam gardens to ensure abundant and sustainable clam harvests. There was nothing natural about it.read more
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4:02 PM | Global warming linked to earthquakes, but they would happen anyway
More Fatal Earthquakes to Come, Geologists Warn. Well, obviously! The earth is dynamic. But the idea that global warming – by the mechanism of unloading water from this place and putting it in another place – is triggering earthquakes is a bit of a flawed headline. “Climate change may play a critical role in triggering… Source: Doubtful News Related posts:American Belief in Global Warming is Rising Weird weather blamed on End Times and climate change Maybe End […]
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3:55 PM | How The Nepal Earthquake Looked On Radar
On April 25th, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, claiming over 5,000 lives and affecting millions more. Relief efforts are under way and satellite imagery is helping to visualize the damage but radar images from the ESA Sentinel-1A satellite showed why Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu, experienced so much damageThe maximum land deformation, shown in before and after pictures, is 8 miles away. The two acquisition dates lead to rainbow-colored interference patterns in the […]
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3:49 PM | Omega-3 may help depression
In a study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, researchers found that the omega-3 fatty acid EPA (eicosapentataenoic acid) appears to boost mood in a subgroup of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have high inflammation levels. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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3:46 PM | Sanitation Saves Lives - Now We Have To Solve The Developing World Solid Waste Management Crisis
The world's population is getting healthier and part of that reason for that is sanitation - but a larger population and a still limited infrastructure means a complex and multi-dimensional approach is needed to manage a rising tide of solid wasteThere is no magic bullet solution like importing modern trucks or technologies or to improve roads. The challenges are daunting - the World Bank’s Urban Development department estimates that the amount of municipal solid waste will reach 2.2 […]
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3:41 PM | Nurture effect on caring relationships
[This essay is an excerpt from the author’s The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve Our Lives & Our World, New Harbinger Publications, 2015] Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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3:34 PM | Sahara Dust Cools The Iberian Peninsula
British people may not like blood rain but Sahara Desert dust is not traveling 2,000 miles over an ocean just to make their cars dirty - it also helps cool things down. Researchers have analyzed the composition and radiative effect of desert aerosols during two episodes which simultaneously affected Badajoz (Spain) and Évora (Portugal) in August 2012 and found that it caused radiative cooling of the Earth's surface. Atmospheric aerosols (solid or liquid particles suspended in the […]
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3:21 PM | Strong evidence for coronal heating theory
The sun's surface is blisteringly hot at 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit -- but its atmosphere is another 300 times hotter. This has led to an enduring mystery for those who study the sun: What heats the atmosphere to such extreme temperatures? Normally when you move away from a hot source the environment gets cooler, but some mechanism is clearly at work in the solar atmosphere, the corona, to bring the temperatures up so high. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology […]
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3:20 PM | How Honeybee Queens Avoid Inbreeding
Genetic variation is important in a healthy population and recombination, or crossing-over, which occurs when sperm and egg cells are formed and segments of each chromosome pair are interchanged, is a vital part of maintaining genetic variation. Honeybees take it to a whole other level and a new study finds that the extreme recombination rates found in this species - 20X higher than humans, higher than measured in any other animal  - seem to be crucial for their survival.read more
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3:16 PM | The intertwining of superconductivity and magnetism
Coexistence of two states of matter that normally avoid one another is revealed by inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a copper-oxide superconductor reveal nearly static, spatially modulated magnetism. Because static magnetism and superconductivity do not like to coexist in the same material, the superconducting wave function is also likely modulated in space and phase-shifted to minimize overlap, consistent with recent theory. The […]
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3:15 PM | Neuroscientist Uses One Person’s Brain to Control Another Person’s Arm (Video)
Greg Gage has always been fascinated by the brain. He dedicated his whole life to studying it, and spent six and a half years in graduate school at the University of Michigan just to earn the title of neuroscientist. As he climbed his way up the academic ladder, Gage noticed a major problem with the field of neuroscience: the equipment needed to do any serious research was so expensive that it was only available in the largest universities and institutions. In other […]
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3:14 PM | A study justifying waste of tax-funds?
Open Access (OA) pioneer and OA journal eLife founding member and sponsor, the Max Planck Society just released a white paper (PDF) analyzing open access costs in various countries and institutions and comparing them to subscription costs. Such studies are […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...
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3:07 PM | Transforming All Blood Donations Into Universal Type O
Every day, thousands of people need donated blood but blood transfusions require that the blood type of the donor match that of the recipient., unless it is blood without A- or B-type antigens, such as type O, that can be given to all of those in need. Mismatched blood with A or B antigens could provoke an immune reaction and even cause death.  For that reason, Type O is often in short supply, but science may soon have a solution. Stephen G. Withers and colleagues write […]
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2:32 PM | What literature can teach us about sleep
"I never met a man who was quite wide awake," Thoreau wrote in "Walden." The sketch shows the cabin where he withdrew from society.By Maria Lameiras, Emory ReportAs a winner of the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship for 2015, Emory English professor Benjamin Reiss will spend the upcoming academic year working on his third book, a cultural and literary study of modern sleep and its almost-obsessive management by society and the medical profession.Reiss's Guggenheim project is "Thoreau's Bed: How […]
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1:26 PM | Sanctions, Divestment: Feel-good Policies But They Often Fail
Economic sanctions and divestment campaigns are attractive but often flawed tactics for accomplishing international political goals.The social stigma the campaigns create often fails to match the economic pain these campaigns inflict, making the costs of resisting them for governments like Russia, Syria and Iran tolerable in most cases.Indeed, sanctions succeed less than a third of the time they are imposed, according to researchers at the nonpartisan Peterson Institute for International […]
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1:24 PM | Getting ‘Schooled’ on Science Communication
  Scientists and engineers should do more public outreach! That phrase almost always conjures up images of blogging, tweeting or working with news media - but it can also include collaborating with your local k12 schools. I came across an interesting paper by Dr. Sam Illingworth, a lecturer in Science Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK. He and his co-author, Heidi Roop, discuss the value of engaging with schools. Beyond the obvious benefit to students, they […]
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1:24 PM | Getting ‘Schooled’ on Science Communication
  Scientists and engineers should do more public outreach! That phrase almost always conjures up images of blogging, tweeting or working with news media - but it can also include collaborating with your local k12 schools. I came across an interesting paper by Dr. Sam Illingworth, a lecturer in Science Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK. He and his co-author, Heidi Roop, discuss the value of engaging with schools. Beyond the obvious benefit to students, they […]
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