Posts

March 24, 2015

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2:56 PM | Pulsed Electric Fields - An Alternative To Thermal Pasteurization In Milk For Low-Income Countries
Milk has a long been a nutritional and economic staple in western countries but it is quickly susceptible to pathogens quite easily, which is why pasteurization, which kills harmful microbes, is the norm for all but the food fad fringes. Due to harmful microbes, raw milk is 150X as likely as pasteurized milk to result in illness.Refrigeration and chemicals can manage pathogen growth but Listeria monocytogenes are less sensitive to low temperature; therefore, they can proliferate at […]
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2:54 PM | Determination of protein concentration
Introduction Finding the exact quantity of proteins in a solution is very often necessary in the biochemical practice and to analyse clinical samples as well as in research. There are many ways to measure protein concentration. In chromogenic methods, the absorbance of a coloured product formed by the protein and an organic molecule is measured. Protein concentration can also be determined from... CopyRight @ Bishnu Marasini @ Science Disdained Nepal. Please Don't reproduce any material from […]
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2:50 PM | Quantum experiment verifies Einstein's 'spooky action at a distance'
An experiment devised in Griffith University's Centre for Quantum Dynamics has for the first time demonstrated Albert Einstein's original conception of "spooky action at a distance" using a single particle. In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, CQD Director Professor Howard Wiseman and his experimental collaborators at the University of Tokyo report their use of homodyne measurements to show what Einstein did not believe to be real, namely the non-local collapse […]
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2:38 PM | A pill to make you more compassionate?
What if there were a pill that made you more compassionate and more likely to give spare change to someone less fortunate? UC Berkeley scientists have taken a big step in that direction. A new study by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco researchers finds that giving a drug that changes the neurochemical balance in the prefrontal cortex of the brain causes a greater willingness to engage in prosocial behaviors, such as ensuring that resources are divided more equally. Subject:  […]
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2:25 PM | That “new breakthrough scientific discovery” you...
That “new breakthrough scientific discovery” you just read about on that news site/blog/Facebook page? It’s almost certainly wrong. This article from Vox is a seriously important thing that, if you care about science, you really need to read, like right now. My take: The tendency of the media to report on what is *NEW* in science is indicative of what I think is the largest perspective gap between scientists and nonscientists. The general public (apologies, I […]
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1:53 PM | Angelina Jolie & Frank Talk About Women’s Health & Personal Choices
Angelie Jolie has written another NYTimes Op-Ed, this one on her double mastectomy and subsequent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (removal of both ovaries and fallopean tubes). It appears she took note of the concern that her first op-ed (on her mastectomy choice) … Continue reading →
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1:43 PM | The Eggs Are Not A Metaphor For Fertility
The woman in the shop with the long, dark plait doesn’t like me. I always do my little, but clear and concise, ‘Hello’, and she doesn’t answer. The way she slams my change on the counter suggests she can’t stand me. I’ve bought so many essential items from her over the past 13 months (Nurofen, [...] The post The Eggs Are Not A Metaphor For Fertility appeared first on HeadStuff.
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1:30 PM | Evidence of huge impact event found in Australia: What did it mean for life on earth?
Australian scientists announced they have discovered a twin asteroid impact crater in the Central Australia that may be the largest ever found. The question is, does it correspond to a major extinction event. Maybe, but it’s not clear yet as the age is questionable. World’s largest asteroid impacts found in central Australia | ANU. A… Source: Doubtful News Related posts:Asteroid Impacts More Frequent Than Previously Thought Odds of Apophis Apocalypse – We’re […]
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1:30 PM | Less Than Half: Alzheimer's Diagnosis Disclosure Rates Much Lower Than Other Serious Diseases
The 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report found that only 45 percent of people with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers were told the diagnosis by their doctor. That is significantly lower than the 90 percent of people told the diagnosis for the four most common cancers.Why? The reason most commonly cited by health care providers for not disclosing an Alzheimer's diagnosis is fear of causing the patient emotional distress but, according to the report, "studies that […]
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1:00 PM | What Are Personality Disorders And How Are They Treated?
Filmmakers know personality disorders make for compelling viewing. Think of attention-seeking Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone with the Wind" (1939). Or the manipulation and callous disregard for others in "Silence of the Lambs" (1991), "The Talented Mr. Ripley" (1999) and "Chopper" (2000). Then there are the fears of abandonment and emotional instability in "Fatal Attraction" (1987) and "Girl, Interrupted" (1999).Cinema is less adept, however, at showing the ordinary joys, heartache and sometimes […]
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12:47 PM | Zeeman Archive
To celebrate Christopher Zeeman’s 90th birthday and their own 150th, the London Mathematical Society have opened an online archive of Sir Christopher’s work. That’s all they’ve done – the Zeeman Archive, as far as I can see, is a simple list of every document they’ve got, linking to PDF scans. It’s searchable, by title, medium, and date.... Read more »
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11:00 AM | Review | Kendrick Lamar talks to ghosts on the compelling ‘To Pimp a Butterfly’
Kendrick Lamar To Pimp a Butterfly [Top Dawg/Aftermath/Interscope] To Pimp a Butterfly closes with a conversation between its author Kendrick Lamar and the late Tupac Shakur. The latter’s dialogue is taken from a November 1994 interview conducted with music journalist Mats Nileskar. Shakur was shot five times just weeks later while finishing up the seminal [...] The post Review | Kendrick Lamar talks to ghosts on the compelling ‘To Pimp a Butterfly’ appeared first on HeadStuff.
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10:00 AM | Dr. Hidaeka Tsuda demonstrates that antineoplastons don’t work against colon cancer
Two things have reminded me that it’s been a while since I’ve written about Stanislaw Burzynski, nearly five months, to be precise. First, on Wednesday evening I’ll be heading to the city where Burzynski preys on unsuspecting cancer patients, Houston, TX, to attend this year’s Society of Surgical Oncology meeting to imbibe the latest research…
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9:30 AM | Birds on the Galápagos Islands have developed new eating habits
New study on the eating habits of birds on the Galápagos Islands have surprised scientists.
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8:00 AM | Guest Post: Cinderella and the Cinema Hangover
This weekend, I took my five-year-old daughter to her first movie in the theater, the new Cinderella. We got popcorn and Whoppers and great seats. The lights dropped, the previews and Frozen short ran, and then the film began, plunging us into another world. Two hours later, we were both hungover.  This new Cinderella plays […]
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8:00 AM | Would You Have Sex For Science?
Who volunteers to have sex in a laboratory? I was struck by this question when reading about an experimental study of ideal sexual positions for men with back pain. For the purpose of the research, couples were filmed using motion capture and infra-red technology while they had sex.The researchers were in a separate booth where they could hear, but not see, the participants. Electrodes were used to record muscle activity in certain parts of the body, to get an idea of force. read more
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6:12 AM | Isolated Attosecond Pulse Generation At The Carbon K-edge - First Proof
In a recent study, "Spatiotemporal isolation of attosecond pulses in the soft X-ray water window " published in Nature Communications by the Attoscience and Ultrafast Optics Group, led by ICREA Professor at ICFO Jens Biegert, the generation of isolated attosecond pulses at the carbon K-edge at 284 eV (4.4 nm), within the water window range, was achieved. Carbon is one of the most abundant elements in the Universe and the building block of life on earth. It is a fundamental element for both […]
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5:36 AM | A salamander the size of a car
In an excavation in Portugal, scientists have found fossil bones of salamanders from 220 million years ago that would have been around two metres long, and about the size of a car – BBC News
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5:25 AM | Birds on the Galápagos Islands have developed new eating habits
New study on the eating habits of birds on the Galápagos Islands have surprised scientists.
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5:09 AM | Alzheimer's: Tau, Not Amyloid, Is The Primary Driver
An examination of over 3,600 postmortem brains has concluded that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer's disease. That means amyloid, the other toxic protein that characterizes Alzheimer's and builds up as dementia progresses is not the primary culprit.There has been an ongoing debate about the relative contributions of amyloid and tau to the development and progression of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's but the […]
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5:01 AM | Old DNA reveals Viking impacts on flora and fauna
Vikings’ navigational skills and travels led to more than plundering and cultural exchanges. It also spread Scandinavian plants and animals to places abroad –
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4:31 AM | Obese Women With Gestational Diabetes Who Add Weight 40X More Likely To Get Type 2 Diabetes
New research published in Diabetologia shows that in women who have developed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy, being obese before the pregnancy and putting on more weight after it massively increases the risk of later developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). read more
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2:32 AM | Canadian Immigrants Are In Better Health Than Citizens - Until They Stay A While
Research has shown that the health of immigrants is generally better than that of citizens of their host country, at least on their arrival and for some time afterwards. But a team of researchers in Montreal has found that this is not true of all groups of immigrants; children and older people, for example, may be exceptions. "Our analysis suggests that immigrant health policies should not be 'one size fits all' in type, and that they need to take account of immigrants' ages and the indicators […]
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2:32 AM | In Latin America, Educated Women Having Kids Outside Marriage Are Increasingly Popular
In Latin America, consensual (common-law) unions are traditionally associated with poorer or indigenous populations. But recent research is turning this conventional wisdom on its head, finding that that in the past 30 years or so consensual unions have become increasingly popular throughout Latin America, including in higher-income groups. In certain countries, such as Panama, common-law partnerships are now as widespread as in Quebec. read more
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2:29 AM | New Zealand science book prize – 2015 Short list
The Royal Society of NZ has announced the shortlist of titles for 2015 Science Book Prize (see 2015 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize). Here they are – together with the judges comments: Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History by Atholl … Continue reading →
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1:55 AM | India Must Address Its TB Epidemic
Effective tuberculosis control in India needs political will and commitment. Unless this happens, TB will continue to be India's silent epidemic and a death sentence for poor people, warns consultant physician and public health specialist, Zarir Udwadia in BMJ.20 years ago it was widely believed that India was successfully on its way to controlling its alarming tuberculosis (TB) epidemic yet India still has 2.2 million new cases and more than 300,000 deaths each year. Economic numbers are a […]
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1:08 AM | National Data Science Bowl Winner Announced
A team that developed an algorithm capable of automating the analysis of plankton populations – a critical step in measuring ocean health - has won the inaugural National Data Science Bowl.read more
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12:32 AM | Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Shows 10 Years Of Changing UK Winters
A 10 year project to observe and analyze regular data about ocean circulation and how it impacts on Britain’s climate has provided new insight into Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a major system of currents in the North Atlantic.10 years is too short a time to be meaningful but it is an important milestone. Since 2004, the project team has been monitoring the AMOC at 26.5N degrees, near where it carries its maximum heat, using instruments moored at 30 locations across […]
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12:06 AM | The Peaceful, Cooperative Maya Transition From Hunter-gatherer to Farmer
Credit: Takeshi Inomata/University of ArizonaA round structure at Ceibal circa 500 B.C. that researchers conclude is too large to have been built by the few permanent residents in the area. From my college days to my present avocation of researching and writing SNfW, I've had a fascination with anthropology and archaeology.  One assumption of mine is that there was a level of conflict between the hunter-gatherer population of a region and newcomers establishing fixed […]

March 23, 2015

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11:49 PM | New viruses discovered in ocean depths
The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea. The least understood of life's three primary domains, archaea thrive in the most extreme environments on the planet: near hot ocean rift vents, in acid mine drainage, in the saltiest of evaporation ponds and in petroleum deposits deep underground. Virus in the deep blue sea […]
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