Posts

October 22, 2014

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11:04 AM | ECFA Workshop: Planning For The High Luminosity LHC
I am spending a few days in Aix Les Bains, a pleasant lakeside resort in the French southwest, to follow the works of the second ECFA workshop, titled "High-Luminosity LHC". ECFA stands for "European Committee for Future Accelerators" but this particular workshop is indeed centred on the future of the LHC, despite the fact that there are at present at least half a dozen international efforts toward the design of more powerful hadron colliders, more precise linear electron-positron […]
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11:00 AM | Dams Are Not The Smart Way To Secure Water For Agriculture
The Ord River dam, completed in 1971, formed Australia's largest artificial lake in the far north west. Graeme Churchard/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SABy Willem Vervoort, University of SydneySome 27 irrigation and dam projects are highlighted in the green paper for agricultural competitiveness released this week by agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce. read more
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10:52 AM | Ebola Elgon
Norman Marshall stretched and sighed, the bones in his shoulders and back cracking like gunshots. It had been a long flight and he needed a shower and a cup of coffee, but instead of sitting at his breakfast bar in his bathrobe, Norman found himself tucked in behind his desk facing into a stack of […] The post Ebola Elgon appeared first on HeadStuff.
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10:41 AM | Discussing the Future of Recommender Systems at RecSys2014
Maya and Kris from the Mendeley Data Science team have just returned from RecSys2014, the most important conference in the Recommender System world. RecSys is remarkable in that it attracts an equal number of participants from industry and academia, many of whom are at the forefront of innovation in their fields. The team had a […]
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9:41 AM | A week with the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro & The Launch!
I was lucky enough to be invited to the launch of Lenovo’s latest products and what a launch it was.  The latest Lenovo products quite simply took your breath away.  To be honest I really wasn’t expecting to go oooh and aaaah!  It was like watching a firework display but better! The products that were launched at this event […]
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9:14 AM | An anonymous Canadian foundation grants $4 million to study “integrative oncology”
Supporters of science-based medicine and keeping pseudoscience out of medicine have a few years to prepare for an onslaught of crappy studies “proving” the value of “integrative” oncology. No doubt at this point you’re wondering just what the heck Orac is talking about. I will tell you. It involves an institution we’ve encountered before and…
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8:00 AM | Guest Post: Bobby Gborgar Joe Speaks From His Bones
October 14, 2014:  At a heady, expert-packed Ebola forum assembled at Johns Hopkins University, a Liberian man said more in a minute and half than everyone else said in five hours. He summed up the United States tainted history with Liberia and begged for respect, this time around. The expert forum was the best, yet. […]
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7:54 AM | Online Dating and the Death of Romance
Monday 6th October   Writing: Five hours creating the perfect online profile.   This morning I remained bundled under my covers and cursed Gala for the ache in my lower back – buttering rolls has twinged something. I am too delicate for such labour. I spent the rest of the day redrafting my online dating persona.   I […] The post Online Dating and the Death of Romance appeared first on HeadStuff.
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5:05 AM | No, Drinking Your Own Urine Will Not Cure Ebola (Or Anything Else)
Fear does strange things to people. The fear du jour currently permeating the US is, of course, the Ebola virus disease. Despite the august efforts to reassure and educate from CDC and the WHO, there has spread a modicum of panic (often with tragic results); we have seen Ebola response become a political issue, and as pointed out recently by that redoubtable scienceblogger, Orac, a ghastly profusion of conspiracy theories and quackery has crawled out of nooks and crannies, feeding... Read more
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4:23 AM | Low birth weight babies cope better with fasting later in life
New study suggests that low-weight babies apparently have an evolutionary advantage during periods of hunger and food shortage.
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4:15 AM | Super-rich rarely start from scratch
The most prosperous business tycoons in Norway have usually had well-heeled parents. Bulging pockets tend to be a bigger initial asset than visionary talent.
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4:02 AM | Miniature human intestine grown in mice for first time
Researchers have grown a miniature human intestine in laboratory mice for the first time as part of a research project, which claims to one day be able to cure intestinal diseases by using a patient's own tissue cells. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 21 October 2014
Today would have been Martin Gardner’s 100th birthday. He was a greatly influential man. FL man claims to find rat head in restaurant’s chili – MSNewsNow.com – Jackson, MS. Unseen infrared image of Loch Ness Monster Nessie to be revealed at Paranormal Festival – Scotland Now. Twitter source of all evil : top Saudi cleric… Source: Doubtful News
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3:49 AM | Unsteady on your feet? Little touches could make all the difference
When a toddler takes their first steps we observe an uncertain sway in their walking. Being unsteady on our feet is something we can experience throughout life – and a new study has shown how even the lightest fingertip touch can help people to maintain their balance. The research, led by the University of Birmingham, explains how neural and mechanical mechanisms synchronize our sway with another person. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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3:49 AM | Why Climate 'Uncertainty' Is No Excuse For Doing Nothing
Science can't tell us exactly when the rising oceans will swallow up the Maldives, but it can give us a good idea. Credit: Hiroyuki-H, CC BY-SABy Richard Pancost, University of Bristol and Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol read more
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3:00 AM | El Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales exhibe sus criaturas misteriosas (Buenos Aires)
Gatos negros, serpientes, lechuzas, búhos, ratas, lobos, animales teratológicos, murciélagos, insectos y arañas han despertado sentimientos negativos a lo largo de los siglos y han sido vinculados con las brujas, el mal y el mundo misterioso de la noche. Bajo la consigna “¿Existen los monstruos?”, el Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia” (MACN, CONICET) invita al público en general a recorrer una […]
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2:47 AM | And the winner is…
I have just returned from the New England Estuarine Research Society meeting in Groton, Connecticut (don’t be jealous). One of my students, Bethany Williams, gave a talk on the coffee-bean snail, Melampus bidentatus, and the effect of sea-level rise. I don’t want to give any spoilers, but as the salt hay in the Great Marsh is lost […]
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1:45 AM | Fluoridation – a racist conspiracy?
Political activists campaigning on health issues often resort to scaremongering. This can be dangerous – especially when their stories have no real basis but rely on selective and distorted information. Paul Connett’s Fluoride Action Network (FAN) often resorts to this sort of scaremongering. Now … Continue reading →
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1:42 AM | Violent Immersion: How 3-D Gaming Affects Player Emotions
Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real –  and in a new study researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than people who played games on 2-D systems.  That may have troubling consequences for young players, according to an upcoming paper in Psychology of Popular Media Culture.read more
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12:30 AM | Slavery In America: Back In The Headlines
The Slave Trade painted by a French abolitionist artist.By Daina Ramey Berry, University of TexasPeople think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t. They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies, but they didn’t. They talk about 400 hundred years of slavery, but it wasn’t. They claim all Southerners owned slaves, but they didn’t. Some argue it was a long time ago, but it wasn’t. read more
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12:15 AM | Australian volcanic mystery explained
Scientists have solved a long-standing mystery surrounding Australia’s only active volcanic area, in the country’s southeast. The research explains a volcanic region that has seen more than 400 volcanic events in the past four million years. The 500 kilometre long […]test The post Australian volcanic mystery explained appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:08 AM | Hong Kong’s Leader: We Have Too Many Poor People to Allow Direct Elections
Since the end of last month, hundreds of thousands of protestors have taken to the streets of Hong Kong to protest the Chinese government’s attempts to maintain its stranglehold on political authority there. In 2017, Hong Kong is set to choose a new chief executive in the first ever democratic election for that position (all the chief executives up to now have been directly appointed by the Chinese government). The only problem: Beijing wants the power to “vet” […]
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12:00 AM | Integrated Science Instrument Module: Webb Telescope's Heart Survives Deep Freeze Test
Though it has been in the works since 1996 and long passed both its original 2011 completion date and even the most aggressive budget estimate, the James Webb Space Telescope has a milestone that may get people excited: after 116 days of extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space […]

October 21, 2014

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11:54 PM | Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 – Superesolution Microscopy
As some of you may have heard, this year’s Nobel Prizes have been awarded to many great and deserving people. This highly prestigious award, started by the dynamite tycoon Alfred Nobel in 1895 (following his death), comes only after having contributed some brilliant work in your field, be it Literature, Peace, Physics, Chemistry or even Physiology […] The post Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 – Superesolution Microscopy appeared first on HeadStuff.
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11:31 PM | Paralyzed man walks after receiving cells from nose
A man paralyzed from the chest down in a knife attack is walking again after undergoing surgery using cells responsible for the sense of smell, marking an advance in the search for treatments for spinal injuries. Darek Fidyka, 38, received the cells after failing to recover from a stabbing in the back in 2010, according to University College London, whose doctors developed the procedure. The technique involves using olfactory ensheathing cells and placing them in the spinal cord. […]
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11:30 PM | In Defense Of NIMBY-ism
It's easy to sneer at people for protecting their backyards, but what if there's a compelling reason to do so? Mickey DeRham photos, CC BY-NCBy Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University.The term NIMBY – “not in my back yard"– has long been used to criticize people who oppose commercial or industrial development in their communities. Invariably pejorative, it casts citizens as selfish individualists who care only for themselves, hypocrites who […]
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11:00 PM | Perception Of Hatred Fuels Conflicts Between Democrats And Republicans
There are some things that Republicans and Democrats share in common with Palestinians and Israelis and lots of other groups where human conflict seems intractable. A new sociology paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says that seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations, and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary […]
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10:52 PM | Read: Yuan Tibet? Place Your Money Where Your Traditional Chinese Medicine Is
The James Randi of China? “A sceptic of traditional Chinese medicine is challenging practitioners of the age-old craft to prove themselves by putting his own money on the line. One has accepted the challenge. At stake is the claim that practitioners can discern whether a woman is pregnant by her pulse.” Way to go, Dr. … Continue reading →
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10:30 PM | Ebola In The USA: Don't Trust What You Read On Twitter
Think twice before you over-react. Image: Jim Bourg/ReutersBy Alfred Hermida, University of British Columbia Whatever you do, don’t turn to Twitter for news about Ebola. The volume and tone of tweets and retweets about the disease will make you wish you were watching the zombie apocalypse of The Walking Dead instead. It is much less scary. read more
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10:13 PM | umichswip: APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics...
umichswip: APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) are three-day regional conferences for undergraduate physics majors. Apply to attend The 2015 conferences will be held Friday, January 16 through Sunday afternoon, January 18, 2015. North Carolina Research Triangle Purdue University Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey University of California, Santa Cruz University of Michigan University of Mississippi University of Texas at Brownsville Yale University The APS CUWiP […]
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