Posts

November 18, 2014

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6:45 PM | UFO speakers tout new evidence and birth of a “science”
Same old stuff. We are being promised new photos of aliens (from Roswell) and told that scientists should be more involved in this new field. I wonder if they have ever researched the history of UFOlogy. It went no where back in the 50s through 70s. What’s changed now? UFO experts say ‘we are not… Source: Doubtful News
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6:28 PM | 'Mexican Waves' In The Brain Revealed
Neurons - cells in the brain that communicate chemical and electrical information - belong to one of two groups, inhibitory or excitatory. Much is known about excitatory neurons but not so much for inhibitory ones.read more
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6:27 PM | Acculturative Stress Causes Depression, Suicide In Latino Youth
An epidemiology analysis finds that acculturative stress, which is a term created to highlight that immigrants straddling two different cultures have greater stress than natives, is the reason Latino youth in Indiana have higher suicide and depression rates than white counterparts. Young people are forced to be one thing in their homes and then also part of the larger outside culture and the conflict between Latino teens and their parents regarding what they do and how they should act […]
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6:19 PM | kqedscience: What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps |...
kqedscience: What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps | Deep Look  Plenty of animals build their homes in oak trees. But some very teeny, tricky wasps make the tree do all the work. “What nerve!” you might say. What… gall! And you’d be right. They’re called gall-inducers. And each miniature mansion the trees build for the wasps’ larvae is weirder and more flamboyant than the next. This is the latest video from Deep Look, our YouTube video series […]
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6:17 PM | Computer model sets new precedent in drug discovery
A major challenge faced by the pharmaceutical industry has been how to rationally design and select protein molecules to create effective biologic drug therapies while reducing unintended side effects - a challenge that has largely been addressed through costly guess-and-check experiments. Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University offer a new approach, in a study published today in Biophysical Journal. Subject:  […]
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6:07 PM | Transparenz bei Open-Access-Publikationsgebühren
... deutsche Einrichtungen stellen Informationen zu Gebühren offen bereit
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6:04 PM | Taking antibiotics during pregnancy increases risk for child becoming obese
A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a Caesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring. Study findings are published online in the International Journal of Obesity. […]
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5:27 PM | Research Focus: Prof. R Lewis, Newcastle University
Today we’re talking to Prof. Rick Lewis about his lab’s recent research article just published in Nature Communications, titled “Structure and function of a spectrin-like regulator of bacterial cytokinesis.”  Rick […]
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5:19 PM | Coffee Creamer, Crackers Linked To Worse Memory
A new study finds that people of 1914 may have had worse memory than people of 1814. The reason is partially hydrogenated oil - trans fats - that became a cheaper, healthier replacement for the saturated fats in butter. Crystallized cottonseed oil - Crisco - came onto the marketplace in 1911 and it revolutionized pie crusts but now the government says they should be banned and they now have a new reason why.read more
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5:19 PM | Sleep now for Rosetta’s comet probe after a bouncy landing
The European Space Agency’s (ESA) pioneering Rosetta mission to land on a comet has been wildly successful, but now it appears that part of its aim, the exploration of the surface by the little Philae lander, may have been cut short. Subject:  Astronomy/Cosmology
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5:10 PM | Climate change will slow China's reduction in infectious diseases
Shanghai depends on water from the Huangpu River, which is connected to the heavily polluted Tai Lake. Photo by Jakub Halun.From Woodruff Health Sciences CenterChina has made significant progress increasing access to tap water and sanitation services, and has sharply reduced the burden of waterborne and water-related infectious diseases over the past two decades. Climate change, however will blunt China’s efforts at further reducing these diseases, finds a study in the latest edition of […]
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5:08 PM | Musicians show advantages in long-term memory
A peek inside the brains of professional musicians has given University of Texas at Arlington psychology researchers what may be the first links between music expertise and advantages in long-term memory. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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5:06 PM | Ancient Chinese Secret: Turmeric Spices Up Your Memory
A single gram of turmeric at breakfast could help improve the memory of people who are in the very early stages of diabetes and potentially at greater risk of cognitive impairment. Turmeric is widely used in Asian cooking. Its characteristic yellow color is due to curcumin, which accounts for 3 to 6 per cent of turmeric and has been found in some studies to reduce the risk of dementia. The finding has particular significance given that the world's aging population and higher risk of […]
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4:58 PM | Microvascular Dysfunction Common In Cocaine Users
Cocaine users complaining of chest pain may have microvascular dysfunction, improper blood flow through the smallest blood vessels that may not be detected in regular testing, putting these patients at risk for heart complications or death, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.read more
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4:57 PM | Some Poor People Have Better Health
It is a weekly event in epidemiology - some medical or health outcome is linked to socioeconomic inequality, as if more spending makes people healthy.read more
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4:39 PM | “Memorial Diamonds”: Diamonds Made From Human Cremation Ashes
Algordanza, a Swiss-made diamond company, offers a unique and elegant way of memorializing our loved ones who have passed. Utilizing a highly complex manufacturing process, Algordanza produces “Memorial Diamonds” out of the carbon contained in human cremation ashes. The human body is roughly 18% carbon. After cremation, 2% of that carbon remains – this is the carbon that is captured in the memorial diamonds. According to BoredPanda… “It all begins with a […]
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4:28 PM | Data Capture for the Real World
Many efforts at building data infrastructures for the “average researcher” have been funded, designed and in some cases even built. Most of them have limited success. Part of the problem has always been building systems that solve problems that the “average researcher” doesn’t know that they have. Issues of curation and metadata are so far beyond the day to day issues that an experimental researcher is focussed on as to be incomprehensible. We clearly need […]
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4:17 PM | Family Planning: Involving Men Empowers Women
In America, and to a much less extent in Europe, there can be a lot of angst when an aerospace engineer wears the wrong shirt on television. Women have a great deal of power in western nations, so much so that they can overwhelm science breakthroughs with cultural Gerrymandering.read more
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4:11 PM | Juiced frog fad may be the death of this strange species
An endangered amphibian, the world’s largest fully aquatic frog, is being used in Peru for quackery. It looks like a stupid human fad may be the end of it. Peruvian Frog Juice Drinkers Laud Health Benefits – ABC News. Frogs from Peru’s Lake Titicaca are the main ingredient in a juice blend that some Andean… Source: Doubtful News
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3:30 PM | Start Writing ASAP
You pitch a story, get an assignment, sign a contract, and start reporting. When do you start writing? When I was first starting out, I would find sources, read papers, […] The post Start Writing ASAP appeared first on The Science Writers' Handbook.
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2:59 PM | Science And Art Meet, Unveiling Mystery And Cultural Tragedy
Preserving paintings is now a matter of chemistry.
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2:36 PM | Movember | Musical Moustaches
Despite my repeated attempts to get Shmigtember off the ground, Movember is once again upon us. Here’s a lowdown of some of the most iconic hirsute upper lips in music history.   10. Little Richard Ever since his first hit with ‘Tutti Frutti’ back in the 50s Richard has sported his trademark pencil moustache with […] The post Movember | Musical Moustaches appeared first on HeadStuff.
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2:26 PM | Drawing Science – Innovative Science Blogging
What if you could catch up on your peer-reviewed literature reading in info-graphics? In this post, I've interviewed Viputheshwar Sitaraman, a freshman and Flinn Scholar at the University of Arizona and creator of the unique science blog Draw Science. Vip is a bio student by day, a lab rat during the afternoons, a web-based entrepreneur by night, and a minimalist designer even later into the twilight hours. He says he is passionate about indie science, reforming science communication, […]
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2:26 PM | Drawing Science – Innovative Science Blogging
What if you could catch up on your peer-reviewed literature reading in info-graphics? In this post, I've interviewed Viputheshwar Sitaraman, a freshman and Flinn Scholar at the University of Arizona and creator of the unique science blog Draw Science. Vip is a bio student by day, a lab rat during the afternoons, a web-based entrepreneur by night, and a minimalist designer even later into the twilight hours. He says he is passionate about indie science, reforming science communication, […]
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2:00 PM | PIWI Pathway Isn't Perfect But It's What Keeps Transposons From Destroying Your Genes
We like to think of evolution as a fine-tuning process, one that whittles away genetic imperfections and redundancies and converges on a more efficient system because of 'survival of the fittest'. But natural selection is just one mechanism of evolution and what is fittest at one point may not have been fittest at another, yet could still be inherited. Our bodies are full of parts that we inherited and either don't work anymore or are rather buggy and other parts have simply found a way to […]
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1:25 PM | Christopher Nolan Films: The Definitive List
As of July 2014 I moved to Japan and while it’s been quite an adventure so far, release dates for the cinemas over here leave something to be desired. Case in point; Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar won’t be released here until the 22nd of November. Seeing as I can’t take part in the hype – so […] The post Christopher Nolan Films: The Definitive List appeared first on HeadStuff.
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12:16 PM | AudioBlind | 6 [feat. Janelle Monáe]
To celebrate the Philae landing this week on AudioBlind I listened to some Science Fiction inspired albums. Janelle Monáe – The ArchAndroid (2010)   The ArchAndroid is Janelle Monáe’s debut studio album and consists of the second and third parts of her Metropolis series. The effect that Fritz Lang’s 1927 epic science fiction had on […] The post AudioBlind | 6 [feat. Janelle Monáe] appeared first on HeadStuff.
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11:01 AM | Phthalates And Prostates: Endocrine Disruptors Shortening The Distance Between Male Anus And Penis
Men are becoming more effeminate. That is not news. If you watched the ESA's Rosetta mission arrive at Comet P67 you saw a tattoo-covered fellow talk about engineering and he looked manly, but two days later he was crying during a press conference because his bowling shirt had offended women on Twitter.read more
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11:00 AM | An Ontario court dooms a First Nations girl with cancer: Who’s to blame?
I figured that yesterday’s post about the First Nations girl in Ontario with lymphoblastic leukemia whose parents stopped her chemotherapy in favor of “traditional” medicine would stir up a bit of controversy, and so it did, albeit much more at my not-so-super-secret other blog, which featured an expanded version of this post. Don’t worry, you…
Editor's Pick
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9:56 AM | Ebola – a Case Study of Scientific Communication
Medical student and Lindau alumnus Yasin Emanee on what the Ebola epidemic taught him about the scientific receptivity of the people in his country. As a final year medical student in India, it is not uncommon to be enquired about the symptoms of diseases and basic medical advice by one’s friends and family. Some time back, when […]
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