Posts

January 27, 2015

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12:49 AM | Could there be life in Titan's methane sea?
If life can exist in the oily seas of Saturn's largest moon, then perhaps we will find it all over the Universe.
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12:49 AM | Renewable jet fuel — not only green but orange-scented
No summary available for this post.
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12:49 AM | Does rotten egg gas flow through the fountain of youth?
Hydrogen sulfide release may be the key to calorie-restricted diets.
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12:49 AM | ‘Lazy’ pitcher plants catch more ants
Carnivorous plants lure more prey when they intermittently ‘switch off’ their traps.
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12:49 AM | 3D printing takes its lead from the pop-up book
Scientists are printing electronic circuits that spring up from a flat surface to form tiny 3D components.
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12:49 AM | Art inspires the magic Rubik's cube
The greatest and most popular puzzle of the 20th century began life as an artwork.
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12:49 AM | Could there be life in Titan's methane sea?
If life can exist in the oily seas of Saturn's largest moon, then perhaps we will find it all over the Universe.
+
12:49 AM | Renewable jet fuel — not only green but orange-scented
No summary available for this post.
+
12:49 AM | Does rotten egg gas flow through the fountain of youth?
Hydrogen sulfide release may be the key to calorie-restricted diets.
+
12:49 AM | ‘Lazy’ pitcher plants catch more ants
Carnivorous plants lure more prey when they intermittently ‘switch off’ their traps.
+
12:49 AM | 3D printing takes its lead from the pop-up book
Scientists are printing electronic circuits that spring up from a flat surface to form tiny 3D components.
+
12:49 AM | Art inspires the magic Rubik's cube
The greatest and most popular puzzle of the 20th century began life as an artwork.
+
12:49 AM | Could there be life in Titan's methane sea?
If life can exist in the oily seas of Saturn's largest moon, then perhaps we will find it all over the Universe.
+
12:49 AM | Renewable jet fuel — not only green but orange-scented
No summary available for this post.
+
12:49 AM | Does rotten egg gas flow through the fountain of youth?
Hydrogen sulfide release may be the key to calorie-restricted diets.
+
12:49 AM | ‘Lazy’ pitcher plants catch more ants
Carnivorous plants lure more prey when they intermittently ‘switch off’ their traps.
+
12:49 AM | 3D printing takes its lead from the pop-up book
Scientists are printing electronic circuits that spring up from a flat surface to form tiny 3D components.
+
12:49 AM | Art inspires the magic Rubik's cube
The greatest and most popular puzzle of the 20th century began life as an artwork.
+
12:49 AM | Could there be life in Titan's methane sea?
If life can exist in the oily seas of Saturn's largest moon, then perhaps we will find it all over the Universe.
+
12:49 AM | Renewable jet fuel — not only green but orange-scented
No summary available for this post.
+
12:49 AM | Does rotten egg gas flow through the fountain of youth?
Hydrogen sulfide release may be the key to calorie-restricted diets.
+
12:30 AM | What Parts Of Education Should Be Done By Teachers Instead Of Parents?
read more
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12:11 AM | Blood on the Paddle – Chapter Four
This is the fourth and penultimate chapter of this gripping serial. You can read the preceding chapters here. A faceless monster is terrorising and murdering all the vulnerable lollipop women in the city. Can John Garrison stop him? He’s about to meet him… Blood on the Paddle – Chapter Four  ‘Better the Psychopath You Know’ ‘It’s [...] The post Blood on the Paddle – Chapter Four appeared first on HeadStuff.
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12:05 AM | Within Reason Episode 206 – (Bad) Science
Originally posted on Moutons No More:Jonathan Jarry hosts another edition of Within Reason, the podcast that looks at contentious issues from a rational perspective. This month, is scientific research inefficient or have we grossly oversimplified the situation? We begin with a mad comedic dash through the life of a young scientist to the sound of…
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12:01 AM | Genetics Underpinning Antimalarial Drug Resistance Revealed
The largest genome-wide association study to date of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum unveils a complex genetic architecture that enables the parasite to develop resistance to our most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin. The results could help to improve early detection of emerging artemisinin resistance. The global research collaboration analysed 1612 samples from 15 locations in Southeast Asia and Africa finding 20 mutations in the kelch13 gene, a known artemisinin resistance […]
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12:01 AM | How Stable Are Arsenic Compounds Found In Edible Algae?
Researchers at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have studied the stability of diverse arsenic species found in edible marine algae and have established the best conditions for their storage and preservation. By developing a specific analytical method, members from the research group of Materials Technology and Environment (TEMATMA) of the School of Civil Engineering of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) have studied the stability of diverse chemical species of arsenic found […]
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12:01 AM | Age-related Macular Degeneration: Blindness Linked To Calcium Deposits In The Eye
Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate have been linked to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness, in a new paper. AMD affects 1 in 5 people over 75, causing their vision to slowly deteriorate, but the cause of the most common form of the disease remains a mystery. The ability to spot the disease early and reliably halt its progression would improve the lives of millions, but this is simply not possible with current knowledge and techniques.read
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12:00 AM | The Stream Biome Gradient Concept published in Freshwater Science
A new concept for examining large-scale biological patterns in streams: now available

January 26, 2015

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11:19 PM | Language Pet Peeves #2: “Impact”
Here’s another word I want to add to my pet peeve list: “Impact.” It’s overused to the point of meaninglessness, and it often has little meaning anyhow. I blame Thompson-Reuters for this over-use because they developed the “Impact Factor.” This, of course is a way of assessing the average citation levels for journals. As the […]
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11:12 PM | How Gut Bacteria May Affect Brain Health
The hundred trillion bacteria living in an adult human, mostly in the intestines, making up the gut microbiome, may have a significant impact on behavior and brain health, according to a new paper. The many ways gut bacteria can impact normal brain activity and development, affect sleep and stress responses, play a role in a variety of diseases, and be modified through diet for therapeutic use are described in a review article ("The Gut Microbiome and the Brain") in Journal of Medicinal […]
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