Posts

August 30, 2014

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3:25 PM | Fish out of water
Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature video.
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2:00 PM | Back To The '80s: Why Nostalgia Is All The Rage In Cinema
The pressure's on JJ Abrams and the new Star Wars films.Credit: wiredphotostream, CC BY-NCBy Sorcha Ní Fhlainn, Manchester Metropolitan University read more
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1:00 PM | Coastal Regions Need To Worry About Non-Climate Change Sea Level Rise Now
Coastal regions under threat from sea-level rise need to tackle the immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a new analysis. It's an even more pressing concern than possible climate change sea rises because those changes are already happening. A team of 27 scientists led by Dr Sally Brown at the University of Southampton reviewed 24 years of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessments, focusing on climate change and sea-level rise impacts in […]
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12:53 PM | Preserving DNA From Challenging Environments
As biobanking technology continues to advance, biobankers are facing more and more opportunities to collect, store and/or analyze specimens from a wide range of environments. Naturally, the optimal setting for dealing with these samples is a sterile lab stocked with the proper equipment, reagents and plenty of cold storage. But that optimum doesn’t exist in Read the rest of this article The post Preserving DNA From Challenging Environments appeared first on Accelerating Science.
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12:01 PM | Pauling's Rules: Protein Crystals Now Plug N' Play
In 1929 Linus Pauling came up with Pauling's Rules to describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charge and type of bonding. According to scientists from the Biohybrid Materials Group of Aalto University Finland led by Mauri Kostiainen, similar rules can be applied to prepare ionic colloidal crystals consisting of oppositely charged […]
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11:49 AM | The Chemistry of Cleaning Defaced Modern Art
Restoring works of art isn’t exactly like restoring Vigo in Ghostbusters II. For one thing, the challenges can be great even on restoring works less than 100 years old. In this fantastic and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:30 AM | New Antibody Shows Promise Against Sudan Strain Of Ebola
Researchers have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola.  Sudan ebolavirus was first identified in 1976 and has caused numerous Ebola outbreaks (most recently in 2012) that have killed more than 400 people in total.   A different strain, the Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), is now devastating West Africa. read more
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8:31 AM | Raloxifene: X-Ray Scattering Reveals A New Mode Of Action For Osteoporosis Drug
Raloxifene is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis and it is effective at reducing fracture risk, but only partially by suppressing bone loss. With the use of wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS, respectively), researchers carried out experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory that revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene […]
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8:20 AM | UPDATED* Reporters scramble as NIH trumpets two assaults against Ebola virus
Yesterday was a frantic day for reporters covering medical science - specifically those following the deadly outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever in West Africa and the global effort to understand and treat it. In Science magazine NIH, the Harvard and MIT-affiliated Broad Institute, and other researchers reported results of genome sequencing about 100 of the virus's strains gathered from scores of patients to reveal their origin, history and accumulating mutations. Five of the genome study's […]
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8:00 AM | The Last Word
August 25 – 29, 2014 The week began with a flight of fancy from Richard. Or was it his lived reality? Only YOU can know the truth. If you never saw a toy robot shape-shifting into a toy vehicle, you might think a movie called Transformers was about this. Cameron follows her nose up to […]
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7:11 AM | High Dietary Salt Linked To Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms
Some research has indicated that salt might alter the autoimmune response, which is implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not clear if it has any direct effect on the course of the disease itself.read more
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6:30 AM | Rapamycin Vs. FK506 For Schwann Cell Migration And Peripheral Nerve Repair
FK506 possesses a well-studied neuroregenerative effect, stimulating neurite extension in the presence of nerve growth factor in vitro, and enhancing nerve regeneration following nerve crush injury and isografting. The use of FK506 to stimulate nerve regeneration is limited because of the risk of renal failure and hypertension, and its considerable cost.  With long-term allografts, FK506 alone or combined with other drugs reportedly cause life-threatening infections. Like FK506, rapamycin […]
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4:30 AM | China's R&D Budget Surpasses The Entire EU - But Applied Research Has Plummeted
In almost 20 years, China's Research  &  Development (R&D) expenditure as a percentage of its gross domestic product has more than tripled, reaching 1.98 percent in 2012.  That is a big improvement, it surpasses all 28 countries that make up the European Union, which collectively managed 1.96 percent. But where is the money going? read more
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4:30 AM | Making fat people slim with modified DNA
Genetically designed cells, which release hormones telling the humane body that it is full, could be a solution to worldwide obesity.
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2:44 AM | Telling Right From Wrong: Why Is Utilitarianism Under Attack?
Is morality and happiness determined by how you affect the people around you? Credit: ShutterstockBy Peter Bowden, University of SydneyIt is a word we hear from time to time, but few of us know what it means. read more
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1:15 AM | Victor J. Stenger dies at 79
A physicist, author and renowned skeptic has passed away. Dr. Victor J. Stenger was an advocate against psychics, pseudoscience and religion. Stenger, a retired elementary particle physicist and author of thirteen books, was a Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and the Center for Inquiry. He served as President of the Colorado Citizens for… Source: Doubtful News
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12:15 AM | The Best of Australian Science: August 2014
It’s the end of August, 2014 and it our time to review the top headlights for this month. This would be our selection for the previous period. From the caves to the classroom From classrooms around the country, students will […]test The post The Best of Australian Science: August 2014 appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:06 AM | ScienceArt Exhibits Through September and Beyond
The inside scoop on the best science art exhibitions around the country: EXHIBITS: NORTHEAST REGION LIFE: Magnified June – November 2014 Gateway Gallery Between Concourse C and the AeroTrain... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

August 29, 2014

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10:41 PM | This Amazing Ant Behavior Is Leaving Even Ant Experts Dumbfounded (Video)
Recently, a video surfaced of ants doing something quite amazing: forming multiple daisy chains to pull a massive centipede (presumably back towards their colony). Check out the amazing video below: According to Terry McGlynn, an Entomologist at Cal State University at Dominguez Hills, the video shows a species of Leptogenys ant somewhere in southeast Asia. What really shocked McGlynn about the video was that even ant experts had never witnessed this particular behavior before. […]
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9:47 PM | Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens - Seth Shostak
We come in peace. redgum, CC BY-NC-SABy Seth Shostak, SETI Institute read more
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8:44 PM | Is That A Real Patient Or A Junkie? Now There's An App For That
A middle aged, male, investment banker arrives at the emergency department with complaints of nausea, vomiting, anxiety and tremor. At business lunches and then at home every evening, he was drinking too much so, worried about his health, he decided to quit drinking and had his last Scotch 24 hours before coming to the emergency room. It's a common scenario in emergency rooms - a patient suddenly stops regular, excessive alcohol consumption and develops withdrawal symptoms.read more
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8:00 PM | All Living Creatures Need Vitamin Thiamine To Live - Except This One
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), which contradicts the common view that E. huxleyi and many other eukaryotic microbes depend on scarce supplies of thiamine in the ocean to survive. All living creatures need thiamine to live, as well as other vitamins. Organisms may produce some of their own vitamins, the way that human cells create vitamin D with help from sunlight, but sometimes they rely on […]
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7:45 PM | Russian Army Wives Demand Answers About Their Incognito Husbands
Yesterday, the U.S. State Department confirmed that over 1,000 Russian troops and armored vehicles had crossed the border into Ukraine and engaged in the fighting there. Despite satellite imagery released by NATO showing the Russian forces, Russian President Vladimir Putin is still denying that the troops and weaponry are of Russian origin. Now, even people within Russia want some answers. Yesterday, several dozen mothers and wives gathered outside of a Russian military base […]
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7:30 PM | Nitrogen-Transforming Bacteria: Now Powered By Hydrogen
Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are key players in the natural nitrogen cycle on Earth and in biological wastewater treatment plants but scientists have learned something new about how they are powered.  For decades, these specialist bacteria were thought to depend on nitrite as their source of energy researchers have now shown that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria can use hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. The oxidation of hydrogen with oxygen enables their growth independent of nitrite […]
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7:15 PM | Chemical Signals: Sexual Attraction, Pheromones And Being Ready At The Right Time
The exchange of chemical signals between organisms is considered the oldest form of communication. Acting as messenger molecules, pheromones regulate social interactions between conspecifics, for example, the sexual attraction between males and females. Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. read more
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7:03 PM | Breaking Beautiful
Researchers found out how orderly patterns of cracks form atop electronics and other objects.
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6:30 PM | Radioactive Cobalt Detected In A Supernova Explosion
Astrophysicists have detected the formation of radioactive cobalt during a supernova explosion, lending credence to a corresponding theory of supernova explosions.  The article's main author, Yevgeny Churazov (Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences), and  co-authors, including Sergei Sazonov of the Space Research Institute and MIPT, reported the results of their analysis of data collected with the INTEGRAL gamma-ray orbital telescope, which they used to detect the […]
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6:00 PM | Snail's Tales: The Rise And Fall Of The Tibetan Plateau
The rise of the Tibetan plateau, the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth, is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. For a new study, Katharine Huntington and colleagues employed a cutting-edge geochemical tool - "clumped" isotope thermometry - using modern and fossil snail shells to investigate the uplift history of the Zhada basin in southwestern Tibet. read more
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5:31 PM | Proton-Proton Fusion: Looking Into The Heart Of The Sun
Using the Borexino instrument, located deep beneath Italy's Apennine Mountains and one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists has directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core.  The pp reaction is the first step of a reaction sequence responsible for about 99 percent of the Sun's power. Solar neutrinos are produced in nuclear processes and radioactive decays of […]
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5:07 PM | Why Replacing Teachers With Automated Education Lacks Imagination
By George Veletsianos, Royal Roads UniversityThe belief that technology can automate education and replace teachers is pervasive. Framed in calls for greater efficiency, this belief is present in today’s educational innovations, reform endeavors, and technology products. We can do better than adopting this insipid perspective and aspire instead for a better future where innovations imagine creative new ways to organize education. read more
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