Posts

March 01, 2015

+
4:33 PM | KFCs in the UK Are Planning to Sell Coffee In Edible Cups… Made Out of Cookies
Every morning, millions of Americans purchase cups of coffee to get their day going. This coffee is typically served in styrofoam cups, which do a great job of keeping the coffee hot. However, styrofoam also takes more than a million years years to decompose, making it terrible for the environment. But what if you could just eat your cup after you finish your coffee? That’s the idea that KFC had when it decided to try out edible cups at select locations in the
+
4:21 PM | Bruce Lee
I became obsessed with Bruce Lee when I was about thirteen. I was big into karate and martial arts. When I say “big into”, I mean more the traditions and aesthetics of them than the actual fighting. I went to a few karate classes, and later Jeet Kune Do when I found out what it [...] The post Bruce Lee appeared first on HeadStuff.
+
4:04 PM | Fixing Outdated Guidelines For Human Vaccine Trials
A volunteer receives a trial Ebola vaccine at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine in Oxford, southern England January 16, 2015. Eddie Keogh/ReutersRecently, Phase II and III trials of two vaccines for Ebola started in West Africa. The development of possible vaccines is welcome news. Like most vaccine trials, the current Ebola trials are being conducted under ethical guidelines derived from US standards for clinical research in human beings. read more
+
3:05 PM | Intranasal Radiology Treatment Breaks The Migraine Cycle
After an interventional radiology intranasal treatment, migraine patients report using less pain-relief medicine for headaches, according to a paper at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting. Clinicians used a treatment called image-guided, intranasal sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) blocks to give patients enough ongoing relief that they required less medication to relieve migraine pain.read more
+
2:49 PM | Where Emperor Penguins Survived The Last Ice Age Interglacial
Too cold for a penguin? An Ice Age brought on by global warming so severe penguins had to move?Indeed. During the last interglacial, what is colloquially called an ice age though it has been such non-stop for a few million years, only three populations of emperor penguins may have survived, because much of the rest of Antarctica was uninhabitable due to the amount of ice. read more
+
2:38 PM | Cyberbystanders: Most Don't Try To Stop Online Bullies
In a new study, 221 college students participated in an online chat room in which they watched a fellow student get "bullied" right before their eyes. Only 10 percent of the students who noticed the abuse directly intervened, either by confronting the bully online or helping the victim. The abuse wasn't real - the bully and the victim were part of the experiment - but the participants didn't know that. "The results didn't surprise me," said Kelly Dillon, lead author of the study and a doctoral […]
+
2:38 PM | Methods To Multiply Pluripotent Cells For Potential Therapies Raise Worries About Cancer
The therapeutic promise of human stem cells is indisputably huge, but the process of translating their potential into effective, real-world treatments involves deciphering and resolving a host of daunting complexities. Writing in the February 25 online issue of the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), have definitively shown for the first time that the culture conditions in which […]
+
2:30 PM | Danceroom Physics: Seeing The Atomic World Through Art
by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science(Inside Science TV) – Scientists often examine matter that is invisible to the naked eye. This hidden atomic world is a mystery for most people, but now a scientist created a way for people to imagine what they might see as their own bodies interact with the atoms that surround them. read more
+
2:00 PM | The Diversity Challenge Facing Universities
Academia could take some lessons from Silicon Valley about diversity. Credit: WikimediaLast week, MIT released a report that closely examines the state of diversity within the university.The report considers MIT’s diversity not just in terms of students and faculty, but also looks at the Institute’s non-faculty research staff who represent approximately 28% of the institution as a whole. read more
+
1:30 PM | Sun's Impact On Climate Is Greater In Cool Periods
The activity of the Sun is an important factor in the complex interactions that control our climate. We don't really even understand the impacr of the sun - it is not constant over time, but has greater significance when the Earth is cooler, according to a new paper in Geology.There has been discussion as to whether variations in the strength of the Sun have played a role in triggering climate change in the past, but more and more research results clearly indicate that solar activity - i.e. the […]
+
12:23 PM | This Week in Chemistry: Blocking Alcohol’s Effects, & Recovering Palladium
Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features a hormone that minimises the effects of drunkenness in rats, a non-metal-based catalyst for creating hydrogen from water using sunlight, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well […]
+
10:00 AM | Strange fungi attack centipedes
Scientists are going to take a close look at parasitic fungi which attack centipedes. These fungi may reveal to be useful in medicin.
+
8:04 AM | Black holes slow formation of new stars
New discovery helps us understand why galaxies have fewer stars than they're supposed to.
+
4:11 AM | The BBC Must Wake Up To New Media Realities
Ariel between Wisdom and Gaiety. WikimediaMy advice to the BBC: ignore the House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport committee report on your future at your peril. read more
+
2:10 AM | Storks Could Be Poisoned By Pesticides During Migration To Africa
Not all storks migrate to Africa, many spend the winter in the Iberian Peninsula, where landfills have become a permanent source of food. Scientists from Extremadura have analyzed the presence of pollutants and pesticides (some prohibited in Spain) in the blood of nestlings from three colonies, two of which are close to landfill sites, and the results reveal that the main source of contamination can be due to the use of insecticides still used in African countries where the birds migrate to, […]
+
2:10 AM | Tagging Drugs To Stop Counterfeit Medicine
The U.S. and other countries are enacting rules to clamp down on the sales of fake pharmaceuticals, which pose a public health threat. But figuring out a system to track and authenticate legitimate drugs still faces significant obstacles, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. read more
+
2:09 AM | Linkage for the end of a short month
The Harriss spiral (G+)Wind-carved towers of sand and ice (G+)Beachbot, a giant etch-a-sketch for your local beach (G+)Linkages that can draw any algebraic curve (G+)Precursors to the Penrose tiling in the works of Kepler and the Islamic architects (G+)Women in mathematics (G+)Big Bang Theory Eye of the Tiger Scene (G+)Why using git is good scientific practice (G+)Klam values and other colorful neologisms from the parameterized complexity crowd (G+)Timsort is broken (and has been for the past […]
+
12:11 AM | Morsels For The Mind – 27/02/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]
+
12:11 AM | Morsels For The Mind – 27/02/2015
Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur […]

February 28, 2015

+
11:39 PM | Boris Nemtsov, Russian Opposition Leader And Vocal Putin Critic, Shot Dead In Moscow
Former Russian Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov was shot dead in Moscow yesterday. Officials say Nemtsov was crossing a bridge in view of the Kremlin at around 11:40 p.m. when multiple attackers (who have yet to be identified) pulled up in a white car and shot him four times in the back before driving off. Nemtsov — who served as Deputy Prime Minister under former Russian president Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s — has never been a fan of Putin, and
+
11:35 PM | Physicists offer a solution to the puzzle of the origin of matter in the universe
Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter. That asymmetry, which favors […]
+
11:33 PM | Life ‘not as we know it’ possible on Saturn’s moon Titan
A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled. It is theorized to have a cell membrane, composed […]
+
11:31 PM | Monster black hole discovered at cosmic dawn
The discovery of the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time presents a puzzle to researchers: How could something […]
+
11:28 PM | Crocodiles rocked pre-Amazonian Peru: Seven crocodile species found in single 13-million-year-old bone bed
Thirteen million years ago, as many as seven different species of crocodiles hunted in the swampy waters of what is now northeastern Peru, new research shows. This hyperdiverse assemblage, revealed […]
+
11:25 PM | DNA evidence shows surprise cultural connections between Britain and Europe 8,000 years ago
DNA evidence shows surprise cultural connections between Britain and Europe 8,000 years ago. Researchers found evidence for a variety of wheat at a submerged archaeological site off the south coast […]
+
11:21 PM | Asian tree rings explain historical plague outbreaks in Europe
Climate-driven plague outbreaks in Asia were repeatedly transmitted over several centuries into southern European harbors, an international team of researchers has found. This finding contrasts the general belief that the […]
+
11:19 PM | Kenyan fossils show evolution of hippos
A French-Kenyan research team has just described a new fossil ancestor of today’s hippo family. This discovery bridges a gap in the fossil record separating these animals from their closest […]
+
11:16 PM | Massive amounts of Saharan dust fertilize the Amazon rainforest
Every year, millions of tons of nutrient-rich Saharan dust cross the Atlantic Ocean, bringing vital phosphorus and other fertilizers to depleted Amazon soils. For the first time, scientists have an […]
+
10:53 PM | Applied Probability
I worked out an equation to calculate the probability your crush likes you back, based on prior interactions. I call it: Bae’s Theorem. This approach is also better than the frequentist method, which is creepy and can get you slapped with a restraining order. (From Matthew R. Francis.)
+
10:29 PM | Good Sleep Keeps Your Stem Cells Young
Under normal conditions, many of the different types of tissue-specific adult stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells, exist in a state or dormancy where they rarely divide and have very low energy demands. "Our theory was that this state of dormancy protected hematopoietic stem cells from DNA damage and therefore protects them from premature aging," says Dr. Michael Milsom, leader of the study. read more
123456789
1,594 Results