Posts

September 17, 2014

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3:51 PM | What your metadata reveals about you
With a great deal of nervousness, Ton Siedsma agreed to an experiment. He would load an app on his smartphone that would send all its activity metadata for one week to Dimitri Tokmetzis who works on datajournalism projects and who would in turn forward it to the iMinds research team of Ghent University and Mike Moolenaar, owner of Risk and Security Experts. All three would analyze the metadata to see what they could learn about Siedsma. The amount they learned was shocking. […]
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3:36 PM | Yoga may help people with bipolar disorder
People with bipolar disorder who do yoga believe their yoga practice has significant mental health benefits, reports a survey study in the September Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:30 PM | Climate Council: Without Action, Rising Seas Will Cost Us Billions
Australia's coast is famous around the world - but rising sea levels are poised to make things a lot less fun. Credit: Adam J.W.C./Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SABy Martin Rice; John Hunter, University of Tasmania; Lesley Hughes, and Will Steffen, Australian National University read more
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3:28 PM | Ebola outbreak 'out of all proportion'
A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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3:25 PM | Toward optical chips
A promising light source for optoelectronic chips can be tuned to different frequencies. Chips that use light, rather than electricity, to move data would consume much less power — and energy efficiency is a growing concern as chips’ transistor counts rise. Subject:  Technology
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3:01 PM | Dark Matter Is A A Bose-Einstein Condensate?
What is dark matter? No one can say because it can't be detected or measured, but in science inference can help and we know that something is making gravity not work properly at the large scale. What we know as matter - stars, planets, us and other organisms - is baryonic matter, but it is only a small fraction of the universe. The rest gets lumped under blanket terms like dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter must be a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison […]
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3:00 PM | Sea Lamprey Shows The Origins Of Brain Development
Parasitic lamprey are a challenge to study but an important one - they are an invasive pest in the Great Lakes but difficult to study under controlled conditions because they live up to 10 years and only spawn for a few short weeks in the summer before they die.  Lamprey are slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless, sucking mouths, and rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights […]
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2:54 PM | DARPA Asked This Grad Student To Design A Jetpack That Makes You Faster. He Delivered
Jason Kerestes is a graduate student studying engineering at Arizona State University. Not long ago, Jason was approached by a team from ASU’s Human Machine Integration Labs. They had heard that he owned his own welding business and wanted his help on a project they were working on designing robotic prosthetics to help amputees. The project was being funded in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the agency responsible for developing new […]
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2:54 PM | Schizophrenia found to be multiple, genetically distinct disorders
New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is reported online Sept. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Subject:  Brain & Behavior
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2:47 PM | Magnetism: The Quantum Around You
We all use magnetism to stick photos to the fridge, find the North with a compass, store data on a hard drive. Although magnetism has been known for centuries, now we understand that magnetic materials only exist thanks to quantum mechanics. Join UNSW Australia's Andrea Morello in this series which proves that quantum mechanics has more of an impact on your daily life than you think.
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2:32 PM | Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work?
Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses. This information is organized into companion computer programs and mobile apps. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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2:31 PM | Trees Love Climate Change
Last decade, science faced an ecological puzzle: under hotter, drier conditions of global warming, forests should have been penalized but instead the rainforests thrived. It isn't the first time - the climate change that caused the death of the dinosaurs gave them a big boost also.read more
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2:18 PM | Mini-Mouth: Making Wine Better, Thanks To Nanoscience
Wine, with its thousands of chemical combinations, can be hard to judge. As numerous studies have shown, getting experts to distinguish between a $4 bottle of wine and a $40 one is in the luck range Can a nanosensor do better? Researchers at Aarhus University believe they are on that path, at least when it comes to dryness.read more
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2:04 PM | Yoga Is Not A Treatment For Bipolar Disorder
One way to know there will be no science at a nutrition conference is to find a yogic flying instructor on the panel roster. Yoga has a variety of mental and physical health benefits, just like all exercise and sports do, but it is not going to cure bipolar disorder or any other disease. Even taking a few dozen surveys of people with bipolar disorder who do hatha yoga, a questionable methodology, does not find clinical benefits outside the placebo range, according to a paper in the Journal […]
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1:57 PM | Vaccine sabotage suspected in childrens’ deaths in Syria
A devastating setback to the fight against the measles epidemic in Syria. At least 34 Syrian children die from contaminated measles vaccine |  The Guardian. At least 34 children have died in rebel-held Syria after being injected with contaminated measles vaccines, the rebel government said on Tuesday, warning that the deaths might be caused by… Source: Doubtful News
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1:10 PM | Church devastated by Ebola as cultural practices aid the spread
This is terrible. Her friends kept telling her to stop touching the sick. Liberia Diary: In Time of Ebola, a Town Loses Its ‘Prayer Warrior’ – Dispatch – WSJ. (Note that WSJ articles may go behind a paywall after a short time.) “Sis” Jartu Kerkulah was the praise-and-worship leader at the Bethel Heart of Faith… Source: Doubtful News
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1:00 PM | The Science of Empathy
By Danielle Sonnenberg Ever since I can remember I have been very aware of the suffering of the people around me. I am cognizant of their facial expressions, body language, and tone of voice. The first time I remember being empathetic was when my parents paid a stranger ten dollars to thank him for getting […]
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12:30 PM | How Richard III Died: Nine Blows To The Head And Then He Was Dead
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12:00 PM | The Wealth Under Afghanistan
Credit: Image of map courtesy of the USGS and composite image by Patricia WaldronBy: Patricia Waldron, Inside Science(Inside Science) -- People living in Afghanistan have mined precious gems from their land, such as lapis lazuli, since the times of the Egyptian pharaohs. But modern analyses of the country's mineral deposits show that the Afghan people have barely scratched the surface of their mineable wealth. read more
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12:00 PM | It’s not just oil pulling, it’s ozone-infused oil pulling!
As I so love to remind my readers, I’ve been at this blogging thing a long time now. In early December, it will have been a full decade since that strange, cold, dreary winter afternoon (well, technically late fall) when, inspired by an article in TIME Magazine about blogging, sat down in front of my…
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10:54 AM | Do We Really Need A Brain?
This seemingly stupid question is not as straightforward as you might think. Well, of course we do need a brain but it’s not so clear how much of our brain we need to actually survive and function somewhat normally. Recently, doctors in China reported the case of a woman who was missing a large portion […] The post Do We Really Need A Brain? appeared first on HeadStuff.
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10:09 AM | Anorexia and I Shake Hands | poetry
Anorexia and I Shake Hands   I woke up dead that morning. Skin peeling in strips like wet paper, spider clumps of hair strewn throughout my bed. I felt my bones crumble like antacids, my organs turning to pulp. A mind careening toward a blank wall.   I woke up dead that morning. The post Anorexia and I Shake Hands | poetry appeared first on HeadStuff.
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9:27 AM | John Ellis On The Ascent Of The Standard Model
Being at CERN for a couple of weeks, I could not refrain from following yesterday's talks in the Main Auditorium, which celebrated the 90th birthday of Herwig Schopper, who directed CERN in the crucial years of the LEP construction.A talk I found most enjoyable was John Ellis'. He gave an overview of the historical context preceding the decision to build LEP, and then a summary of the incredible bounty of knowledge that the machine produced in the 1990s.read more
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8:27 AM | The Art of the Nobel Prizes
As Nobel Week 2014 is approaching Linda Moussakova shares an overview of the various art projects related to the Nobel Prizes. « inuentas aut qui uitam excoluere per artes » « inventions enhance life which is beautified through art » The Aeneid  Book VI verse 663 available on classics.mit.edu This extract from The Aeneid was engraved […]
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8:14 AM | Impact that doomed the dinosaurs helped the forests bloom
Some 66 million years ago, a 10-km diameter chunk of rock hit the Yucatan peninsula with the force of 100 teratons of TNT. It left a crater more than 150 km across, and the resulting megatsunami, wildfires, global earthquakes and volcanism are widely accepted to have wiped out the dinosaurs and made way for the … Continue reading →
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8:06 AM | If The Scientific Truth Is Inconvenient, Publish your Own Truth!
A fellow meteorologist pointed me to a web-site today about a new scientific society called the Open Atmospheric Society (OAS), which is apparently in the process of organizing. They have a fancy logo, and a list of membership requirements that look very similar to that of other scientific societies, until you start looking closely. When you do, things begin to look a rather strange. One of the options to full …
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8:05 AM | 6 out of 200: Mathematics – Freedom and Creativity
Meet Sira Gratz in this Q&A series with 6 out of 200 mathematicians or computer scientists participating at the 2nd Heidelberg Laureate Forum, September 21-26, 2014. 26 Laureates (Abel Prize, Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize, Turing Award) will attend the forum together with them. For a full week Heidelberg in Germany will be the hot spot of mathematics and computer science.   Name? Sira Gratz Nationality? Swiss/ German Where are you based? Hanover, Germany What is your current position? […]
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8:00 AM | Stepping Off the Multi-Tasking Treadmill
Yesterday in the Washington Post, I wrote about how I wanted to love my treadmill desk, but I just don’t. I had high hopes. I’ve been a standing desk user for more than 10 years, long before they were a “thing.” I’m an active, restless person who already spends more than 80 percent of my […]
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7:02 AM | Ebola Virus And Protein Secrets
The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 2000 lives and has spurred calls for a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of the virus that could be critical in the development of vaccines or antiviral drugs to treat or prevent Ebola hemorrhagic fever. A team at the University of Virginia, under the leadership of Dr. Dan Engel, a virologist, and Dr. Zygmunt Derewenda, a structural biologist, has obtained the crystal structure of a key protein involved in Ebola […]
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5:26 AM | Concurso fotográfico “Ciencia en un click” (Santa Fe, Argentina)
Incentivar la imaginación y la creatividad en torno a la ciencia y la tecnología es el objetivo del concurso organizado por la Subsecretaría de Apropiación Social de la Secretaría de Estado de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación de la provincia de Santa Fe (Argentina). El desafío está destinado a los jóvenes en edad escolar pertenecientes a los niveles primarios, secundarios y escuelas técnicas, así como a […]
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