Posts

October 01, 2014

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4:30 AM | New study shatters established knowledge of the immune system
Danish scientists discovers how the immune system is activated to break down bacteria. The experiments disproves a prevalent established theory about the immune
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4:09 AM | Happy farmer, happy cow
To succeed with farm animals, you should enjoy yourself and be kind and calm. The result will be happy cows and more milk.
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3:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 30 September 2014
This crap again?! Andy Kaufman is dead. Deal with it, people! Friend: Andy Kaufman is still alive. Zmuda knows it and is just trolling you, keeping the legacy and spirit of Kaufman alive… OK, DON’T READ ANYTHING INTO HOW THAT WAS PHRASED! Lumber yard owner finds Jesus in tree trunk – Memphis, Tennessee. Jesus Christ makes… Source: Doubtful News
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3:55 AM | Trilobite Copter, Resting
Before I began blogging over 7 years ago, I was already putting bat and insect wings on the extinct aquatic arthropods known as trilobites. Let’s not get into why I am fascinated with the idea... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:30 AM | Why Japan’s Deadly Ontake Eruption Could Not Be Predicted
Phreatic eruption: Mount Ontake. Credit: EPA/Ministry of Land, InfrastructureBy Rebecca Williams, University of HullMount Ontake, Japan’s second-highest volcano, erupted killing at least 31 people on September 27. Since then, there has been feverish speculation about why tourists were on an active volcano and why the eruption wasn’t predicted. read more
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12:15 AM | New app offers relief for hay fever sufferers
Hay fever and asthma sufferers in Canberra will soon be able to receive daily counts and forecasts of pollen levels thanks to a free app released by ANU researchers. Project leader Professor Simon Haberle says Canberra is a hot-spot for […]test The post New app offers relief for hay fever sufferers appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:01 AM | Medications: The Leading Cause Of Allergy-Related Deaths
 An analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010 has found that medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S. The study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years.  read more

September 30, 2014

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11:30 PM | Women Scientists Get Vocal About Top Billing On Twitter
Women ask why there aren't more women in lists of top scientists. Credit: Katrina Cole, CC BY-NCBy Victoria Metcalf, Lincoln University, New ZealandA steady infiltration of scientists onto Twitter has accompanied the growing recognition that a social media presence is just as important as taking the podium at a conference. read more
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11:16 PM | Mr Deity and The Help
Lucy talks with Mr. Deity about all the help he's been giving people in the wealthier countries of the world. Those of us here at Machines Like Us love Mr. Deity and its creator Brian Keith Dalton, and were sorry to learn that he has been having a rough time this year (as he explains at the end of the video below). That's why now, even more than ever, we help support Mr. Deity with our donations, and urge you to do the same!
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11:01 PM | Multiple Sclerosis Patients Benefit From Exercise
A new study has found that people with multiple sclerosis may reduce perceived fatigue and increase mobility through a series of combined strength training and fitness exercises. The research from the Miguel Hernández University of Elche, supervised by Professor Raúl Reina, aimed to analyze the effects of strength training on the fatigue that MS patients suffer. A total of 19 participants (5 men and 14 women) were split into two groups. Most took part in a 12-week training […]
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10:36 PM | Why it is the non-religious who can, and must, save the world
(This text is a transcript of my talk at the Cleveland Sunday Assembly held on September 28th, 2014.) Subject:  Atheism & Religion
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10:33 PM | The World Has Lost HALF of Its Wildlife In the Past 40 Years, According to the WWF
The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) made a truly heartbreaking announcement yesterday: according to a new analysis, the number of wild animals living on our planet has been reduced by half in just the past 40 years. The findings come from extensive research done by scientists at the WWF and the Zoological Society of London. The report states that creatures, both on land and in the water, have been decimated by unsustainable hunting practices. At the same time, industrial […]
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10:30 PM | Rabies - A Global Killer That Dog Jabs Can Eliminate
When a dog is rabid, it's time to run. Credit: Mytoenailcameoff, CC BY-NC-SABy Katie Hampson, University of Glasgow read more
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10:20 PM | Hybrid 'patch' could replace transplants
Because heart cells cannot multiply and cardiac muscles contain few stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack. Now Tel Aviv University researchers are literally setting a new gold standard in cardiac tissue engineering. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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10:12 PM | Could this app create a free, secret web?
Facebook is doing it with drones, Google is doing it with balloons that occasionally crash into power lines. Bringing free Internet access to the unconnected millions in developing countries is complicated and expensive. What if there was an easier way? A startup called Open Garden thinks the answer is already in people’s pockets: their smartphones. Subject:  Technology
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9:20 PM | Massive Study Shows How Languages Change
Why Russian is harder to learn than English.
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9:00 PM | The original iceman
A 3,300 year old person? Yep, it’s true. Sure, he might have stopped breathing a long time ago, but he’s looking remarkably good for his age. And whilst he no longer has the power of speech, there’s still an awful lot he can tell us about his life all those years ago. Meet Ötzi, the 3,300-year-old iceman.
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8:58 PM | Brain Injury In Sport Is An Unfolding Tragedy – We're Only Now Starting To Count The Cost
Dave ‘Bear’ Duerson, 22, in action. Credit: PABy Jordan Gaines Lewis, Penn State College of MedicineAh, football. The great American pastime.The freshly cut grass and crisply-painted yard lines. The sound of helmets clashing in an epic stack of large men vying for a single ball. Stands packed high with thousands upon thousands of crazed, prideful, body-painted fanatics. Dementia, confusion, and depression.Wait, what? That last bit may not be present on game day, but for many […]
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8:23 PM | OAT (One Amazing Thing): Bathynomus (Giant Isopod!)
We all love a good science fiction creature. Well, here’s one that really exists! The amazing bathynomus is an isopod that begs for stories to be written about it! I saw this specimen with Chris Mah at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. Learn more at Chris’s amazing blog: The Echinoblog. You can also read […]The post OAT (One Amazing Thing): Bathynomus (Giant Isopod!) appeared first on Stay Curious.
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8:13 PM | How space dust teaches us about scientific progresses
Sometimes I feel that it sucks to be a physicist. (Just to clarify – I am not one, and this is my personal opinion, having worked years in a department full of physicists, and with a background in non-physics fields. This is not after any discussion with other physicists in my dept – they might agree, they might […]

Ade P.A.R., M. Amiri, D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock & G. Davis & (2014). BICEP2. II. EXPERIMENT AND THREE-YEAR DATA SET, The Astrophysical Journal, 792 (1) 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/792/1/62

Ade P.A.R., D. Barkats, S. J. Benton, C. A. Bischoff, J. J. Bock, J. A. Brevik, I. Buder, E. Bullock, C. D. Dowell & L. Duband & (2014). Detection of B-Mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales by BICEP2, Physical Review Letters, 112 (24) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.112.241101

Planck Collaboration, R. Adam, P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, J. G. Bartlett & N. Bartolo (2014). Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes, arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.5738v1

Citation
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7:50 PM | University Of Rochester Researchers Make Cloaking/Invisibility Device (Video)
Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to cloak large objects from sight, using what they call a “Three-dimensional, Transmitting, Continuously Multidirectional Cloaking Device”. Cloaking is the process by which an object becomes hidden from view, while everything else around the cloaked object appears undisturbed. What is most amazing is that the device can be created using inexpensive and readily available technology. The cloaking device requires four […]
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7:32 PM | iPhone Slow Motion Tutorial
In the last post, I included a video tutorial showing how to make a slow-motion film with a GoPro Hero camera. But did you know that your iPhone (5s and above) can shoot slow motion video also? There is an option … Continue reading →
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7:00 PM | Pollution Linked To Sea Turtle Cancer
Farm runoff and urban pollution in the Hawaiian islands is causing sea turtle tumors, according to a study in PeerJ. The paper by researchers at  Duke University, the University of Hawaii and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds that nitrogen in the runoff ends up in algae that the turtles eat, promoting the formation of tumors on the animals' eyes, flippers and internal organs.read more
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6:56 PM | Hydrogen Peroxide: Hair Dye, Glow Sticks & Rocket Fuels
It’s been a while since the last update to the Everyday Compounds series – this latest graphic looks at hydrogen peroxide. Everyone’s familiar with the term ‘peroxide blonde’, stemming from the use of hydrogen peroxide in hair dyes, but this accounts for just one of the compound’s many uses; it’s also found in several other […]
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6:30 PM | Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity Determines Likelihood Of Getting Cancer
A new report shows early detection of cancer could one day be as easy as a simple blood test. This test, called the "lymphocyte genome sensitivity" (LGS) test, could not only detect some cancers earlier than ever before, but it may eliminate the need for some types of biopsies, as well as identify those more likely to develop cancer in the future.  "The test could allow earlier cancer detection, so helping to save peoples' lives," said Diana Anderson, co-author at the University of […]
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6:22 PM | Americans Get Too Many Colonoscopies
Colonoscopies are a very valuable procedure by which to screen for the presence of colorectal cancer but healthy Americans who undergo the uncomfortable examination often have repeat screenings long before they actually should, finds Gina Kruse of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. read more
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6:00 PM | Picture of the Week: Mammalian Eye
No summary available for this post.
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5:32 PM | Beat Jet Lag With Some 'Light' Math
A faster way out of jet lag and back on track.
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3:50 PM | Sweat-Rating Bacteria Improve Skin Health - Study
Bacteria that metabolize ammonia may improve skin health and could even be used for the treatment of skin disorders like acne, finds a new study conducted by AOBiome LLC. Ammonia is a major component of sweat.  In a small study, human volunteers using the bacteria reported better skin condition and appearance compared with a placebo control group. read more
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3:27 PM | Entanglement made tangible
Quantum entanglement refers to the "pairing" of two subatomic particles in such a way that they form a whole quantum system. Interest in entanglement is increasing today, as it challenges the foundations of quantum mechanics itself, and is also key for achieving quantum information processing and communication. Subject:  Technology
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