Posts

October 24, 2014

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6:00 PM | How Innovation Happens in the Digital Age
No summary available for this post.
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3:21 PM | Infection projections: how the spread of Ebola is calculated
The number of reported Ebola cases is doubling roughly every five weeks in Sierra Leone, and in as little as two to three weeks in Liberia. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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1:29 PM | Mendeley at JCDL 2014
The Mendeley Data Science team have been busy attending some important events around the world. One of them has been JCDL 2014, the most prominent conference in the Digital Libraries arena. The conference looks at many of the problems we’re tackling at the moment, such as article recommendations and the best ways of automatically extracting […]
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12:00 PM | Your Friday Dose of Woo: Just what acupuncture needs. Holograms. And more quantum.
It’s been a bit of a depressing week. I suppose it’s not any more depressing than usual, with the usual unending stream of pseudoscience, quackery (particularly of the Ebola type), and, of course, antivaccine nonsense to deal with. Then, as I’m writing yet another in a long line of unfunded grants, I find out that…
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9:30 AM | Homeopathy Awareness Day: Post-Mortem
Homeopathy is the low-hanging fruit from the perennial tree of irrationality. This year, in order to draw awareness to its ludicrous claims, I published an article in the Prince Arthur Herald and a video on this site. The response was predictable. While the content received plenty of positive feedback and dissemination, a couple of proponents of … Continue reading →
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8:00 AM | Conversation with Sharon & Geoff: Starship Fusion
Last week, Lockheed announced it had a small team working on what it calls a Compact Fusion Reactor.  Fusion happens when two atomic nuclei fuse; it’s the opposite of fission that’s used in nuclear plants today, and it can produce enormous amounts of energy. The fuel for fusion is cheap and plentiful; a small fusion […]
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6:34 AM | Undead Carl Sagan wants to eat billions and billions of brains....
Undead Carl Sagan wants to eat billions and billions of brains. Awesome time at the Pemberley Digital Halloween bash tonight with all my Frankenstein MD friends!
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4:30 AM | First image of an irritable bowel
Just a few years ago many in the medical profession thought that the common intestinal malady irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was psychological – with its
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4:23 AM | Get a better life: say no
Say NO. Focus on the negative aspects. Repress your emotions. That kind of advice probably does not sound right to a lot of people, but it’s a better idea than
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3:59 AM | The Strange remains the same for 23 October 2014
Myra is still missing – so is evidence that psychics help to solve crimes – JREF. Exam finds girl fit for trial in Slender Man case; defense challenges Train faith healers, herbalists on mental health care | Health News 2014-10-23. Ebola hits home for a Liberian faith healer – LA Times. Italian seismologists fight to… Source: Doubtful News
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3:16 AM | Quick Thought for the Night
The Society of Forensic Toxicologists (SOFT) annual conference is wrapping up tomorrow. I'll be glad to get home to my family, bed, and shower, but I cannot express how grateful I am to hold membership in a wonderful organization. SOFT is quite a bit of fun, but it is always a tremendous learning experience.  Here's to 2015 in Atlanta.
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3:00 AM | Vertigo, Ebola, sonar, and: Can artificial turf cause cancer?
After several absorbing days at ScienceWriters2014, I've fallen behind. Here are a few quick things that I didn't want to miss: Meredith Levine wrote an interesting piece for CBC News in Canada on vertigo, which has little to do with the Hitchcock movie but can be a serious, disabling illness, as she found out herself when she was struck with it. While that sparked her interest, she wisely left herself out of the story, giving us instead a clear and useful update on the condition and its […]
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1:55 AM | Sigue la gira #AcercaCienciaARG
Como te anticipamos en un post anterior, salimos de la web para mostrar nuestro trabajo y trasmitir nuestra pasión por las ciencias en distintos lugares de Argentina. Nos proponemos despertar la curiosidad de público por las Ciencias Naturales y para ello ambas fundadoras de la web, Cecilia Di Prinzio y Emma O’Brien participarán de encuentros de divulgación científica por distintas ciudades de Argentina. Apunta! *Viernes 7 de noviembre -Instituto […]
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12:15 AM | Hawaiian natives protest Mauna Kea telescope
Politics or spiritualism? There remains hostility over the United States’ annexation of Hawaii and an undercurrent feeling of astronomy as an “industry”. Very weird to us but not weird to natives who feel intruded upon. Seeking Stars, Finding Creationism – NYTimes.com. This month a group of Native Hawaiians, playing drums and chanting, blocked the road… Source: Doubtful News
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12:15 AM | CSIRO produces 3D heel in world first surgery
CSIRO, St Vincent’s Hospital and Victorian biotech company Anatomics have joined together to carry out world-first surgery to implant a titanium-printed heel bone into a Melbourne man. Printed using CSIRO’s state-of-the-art Arcam 3D printer, the heel bone was implanted into […]test The post CSIRO produces 3D heel in world first surgery appeared first on Australian Science.

October 23, 2014

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11:50 PM | We're Too Late To Prevent 137,000 More Ebola Cases, Says Epidemiology Paper
The Ebola virus problem in West Africa has gotten lots of high-profile media coverage in developed nations - and no lack of reasons for people to clamor for more funding. No less than Dr.read more
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11:07 PM | The Army May Not Increase Risk Of Suicide, More Suicidal People May Join
Due to increased awareness of suicide and military life, there has been concern military lifestyle may be causing more suicides. A new study instead finds that new soldiers are twice as likely to have three or more psychological disorders, or comorbidity, prior to enlisting as civilians. They may regard the military as a solution to their problems. read more
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10:39 PM | Now we know where these weirdo arms belonged
For almost 50 years, paleontologists had a mystery set of giant dinosaur arms. The rest of the animal has now been discovered… and his arms have been put back on. Mystery of dinosaur with giant arms solved. In the 1960s, researchers unearthed two gigantic dinosaur arms. For decades, scientists have speculated about what kind of… Source: Doubtful News
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9:56 PM | “We have a liftoff!” – Propellants
Watching a rocket launch can be nothing but exciting; although one may argue that it’s dull and plain, I find the sound very exhilarating and powerful. So how do we actually launch a rocket into space? Unlike traditional airplanes, which use wings with differences in air velocities to produce higher pressure on the bottom of […]
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9:21 PM | Can general anesthesia trigger dementia?
Scientists try to untangle the relationship between a temporary effect and a permanent condition. Sanfra Anastine had surgery at age 42 and couldn’t speak for about 12 hours afterward. The next time she was operated on she was 56 and it took three months for her speech to return. Now 61, Anastine says that she doesn’t have difficulty forming words anymore but is still more forgetful than before her second surgery. She’s afraid of what will happen if she has to go […]
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9:17 PM | Ferns Will Survive
Ferns are an old plant species, dinosaurs munched on them over 200 million years ago. If we want to know how to survive against nature's onslaught over the long haul, ferns are as good a place as any to start. Even recent ones can show us how to evolve and outlast. A group of ferns evolved much more recently, and they did it while colonizing the extreme environment of the high Andes. Their completely new morphology (form and structure) arose and diversified within the last 2 million years. How […]
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9:02 PM | Ironically, Asking Questions To Identify Teens At Risk Of Hearing Loss Doesn't Work
There is no substitute for a hearing test, especially in an age group that doesn't self-report very well. Currently, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Bright Futures children's health organization recommends screening adolescents with subjective questions but that does not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.  "We found that you can't rely on the Bright Futures questions to select out teenagers at […]
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8:31 PM | Missing link found between vitamin D and prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between Vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by Vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation. Subject:  Health & Medicine
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8:17 PM | That’s One Amazing Animal: The Mantis Shrimp
I remember, about a year ago, my brother came home from school telling me about this really cool animal he’d learned about in school; an incredibly strong, brightly coloured, able to see more colours than we could possibly imagine – shrimp? At first I thought, no way, this has got to be another one of […]
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8:07 PM | Sunshine may slow weight gain and diabetes onset
Exposure to moderate amounts of sunshine may slow the development of obesity and diabetes, a study suggests. Scientists who looked at the effect of sunlight on mice say further research will be needed to confirm whether it has the same effect on people. The researchers showed that shining UV light at overfed mice slowed their weight gain. The mice displayed fewer of the warning signs linked to diabetes, such as abnormal glucose levels and resistance to insulin. Subject:  […]
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7:49 PM | Extreme Ice Age Living: Human Settlement 15,000 Feet In The Andes
Think you're extreme? 12,000 years ago Ice Age Humans lived and worked at an altitude of almost 15,000 feet, high in the Peruvian Andes. The sites in the Pucuncho Basin, located in the Southern Peruvian Andes, are the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites found to-date. The primary site, Cuncaicha is a rock shelter at 4,480 meters above sea level, with a stone-tool workshop below it. There is also a Pucuncho workshop site where stone tools were made at 4,355 meters above sea level. […]
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7:33 PM | Deinocheirus Mirificus Puzzle Solved, Revealing The Weirdest-Looking Creature To Walk The Planet
Deinocheirus mirificus. Credit: Yuong-Nam LeeBy Stephen Brusatte, University of EdinburghEverywhere scientists look it seems like they are finding dinosaurs. A new species is emerging at the astounding pace of one per week. And this continues with the announcement of perhaps the strangest dinosaur find over the past few years: the toothless, hump-backed, super-clawed omnivore Deinocheirus mirificus that lived about 70m years ago in what is now Mongolia. read more
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7:01 PM | The World's Continents Weren't Always Created In The Way That We Thought
How many continents can you count on one hand? Image: ChonesBy Nick Rawlinson, University of Aberdeen read more
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6:17 PM | It Takes More Than Singing To Strike A Chord In Music Education
Credit: Khairil Zhafri, CC BYBy Anita Collins, University of Canberra read more
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6:16 PM | Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain
For the first time, a team of interdisciplinary researchers have made recordings of neurons associated with visual perception inside the poppy seed-sized brain of a jumping spider (Phidippus audax). Though neurobiologists have tried for half a century to better understand the brains of jumping spiders, no one has succeeded. The liquid in spiders’ bodies is pressurized, as they move with hydraulic pressure and muscles, so they don’t tolerate previous research techniques. […]
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