Posts

October 15, 2014

+
1:30 PM | “Several scientific errors” sink physics paper after rewrite opportunity
We don’t love this somewhat incoherent retraction for a paper on coherent states, although luckily the publisher was prompt with telling us a little more about what happened. On October 2, a 2008 physics paper, “Generation of a superposition of coherent states in a resonant cavity and its nonclassicality and decoherence,” was retracted for “several scientific […]
+
1:24 PM | Polyethylene Production coming to North Dakota
While my homestate of Minnesota remains a frack-free zone (due to Mother Nature's choice to stock us with iron, copper and other minerals rather than even a drop of petroleum), our neighboring state of North Dakota is pretty much ground zero for the effort. And we hear about it a lot since many people have taken the day's drive out there for the good paying jobs. Western North Dakota is not highly populated, so manpower is short. If you can pass a drug test and supply your own housing, you can […]
+
1:00 PM | Scientific American Online Now Speaks Spanish
In 1845, when Scientific American was founded, the name was aspirational for a young country in the midst of the Industrial Revolution. Before the 1800s were out, however, it launched an edition in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:00 AM | Psychology: A Very Short Introduction
By Gillian Butler and Freda McManus Synopsis: Psychology is part of everyone’s experience: it influences the way we think about everything from education and intelligence, to relationships and emotions, advertising and criminality. People readily behave as amateur […]
+
12:15 AM | Some Thoughts on “Privilege”
To assume that one’s voice and cultural contribution don’t count because one was born into “privilege” is as narrow and toxic as to deny one’s voice because one was born into poverty. This is by no means to discount the […]test The post Some Thoughts on “Privilege” appeared first on Australian Science.
+
12:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Rebecca Stefoff
Special thanks to Rebecca Stefoff for answering 5 questions about her recently featured book – The Third Chimpanzee for Young People: On the Evolution and Future of the Human Animal I’m Rebecca Stefoff, the author of […]

October 14, 2014

+
6:11 PM | Should we put our money where our citations are?
A while back I covered a study called “From funding agencies to scientific agency,” by researchers from Indiana University’s Department of Information and Library Science (Bollen, Crandall, Junk,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
5:35 PM | Correcting the scientific record: An introduction to retractions
The modern scholarly publication system serves as the primary means of communicating scientific results, typically through peer-reviewed articles. While the peer-review process attempts to keep... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:30 PM | PubPeer Selections: PubPeer comments lead to Science correction; crystal structure in triplicate
Here’s another installment of PubPeer Selections: “Hello. I am the first author and thank you for pointing out this issue,” writes an author of a Science paper. “Since your posts, we have carefully investigated what happened. During preparation of multiple drafts and revisions I inadvertently used the same image twice.” The author continues: “I hope […]
+
1:55 PM | Yet more activist investors thinking they can run a chemical business
I've been writing a fair amount this past year about Daniel Loeb and his efforts as an activist investor to tell Dow Chemical's CEO how to run his business (1, 2, 3, and 4).Since Dow is doing so well (no doubt as a direct result of Loeb's guidance (/sarcasm_off), Loeb is looking for a new place to produce similar results, now setting his sights oversee on DSM. He wants DSM to sell off the low profit plastics business and focus exclusively on the baby food and nutrition supplements business […]
+
1:30 PM | Ripping off someone else’s thesis sinks paper on chicken temperatures
Proof that people will plagiarize anything they think they can get away with: a Brazilian scientist plagiarized a masters’ student’s thesis on the surface temperature of chickens. We spoke with International Journal of Biometeorology editor-in-chief Scott Sheridan about the case: It was a case of plagiarism – the lead author plagiarized some text in Portuguese in […]
+
3:05 AM | Science Book a Day Celebrates its 500th Book!
Congratulations to Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, for becoming the 500th book featured on Science Book a Day! Doing Science Book a Day, you get to see the numbers of the books you’ve […]
+
3:00 AM | A Short History of Nearly Everything
By Bill Bryson Synopsis: One of the world’s most beloved writers and bestselling author of One Summer takes his ultimate journey—into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill […]
+
12:15 AM | A Futuristic Review of Cyber Defence
Cyber age has begun in the previous century and includes everything related to the web, computers and mobile technologies. As cyberspace has been developing, some security concerns have appeared. The future of computing technologies is clear – we are going […]test The post A Futuristic Review of Cyber Defence appeared first on Australian Science.

October 13, 2014

+
3:33 PM | How meta: Paper on errors retracted for “too many stupid mistakes”
A paper published in Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science has been retracted for statistical and typographical mistakes. Here’s the notice for “Comparing Measurement Error Between Two Different Methods of Measurement of Various Magnitudes”: Due to errors, the statistical analyses of the manuscript titled “Comparing Measurement Error Between Two Different Methods of Measurement of Various Magnitudes” by […]
+
1:30 PM | Asthma study yanked for serious ethical violations
A paper in SpringerPlus on treating asthma with antioxidants was retracted on September 25 for something of a trifecta of ethical problems. The retraction notice indicates that the patients never consented, there was no ethical review, and the university supposedly overseeing the study had no knowledge of it: Improved treatment of Asthma by using natural sources of antioxidants Nguyen Van […]
+
12:52 PM | Dinosaur Mode
I had some very strange dreams towards morning including this gem: a cellphone that would mock me. Every time I would try and do something with it such as texting, a picture of an apatosaurus-type dinosaur would appear on the screen, implying that I was using an old, outdated technique and that faster, more efficient options now existed. That's not fair! I can't text as fast as my son (whose replies seem to violate the space-time continuum), but I'm more than able to find an efficient option […]
+
3:00 AM | The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution
By Walter Isaacson Synopsis: Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the […]
+
12:15 AM | What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature
“Writers open our hearts and minds, and give us maps to our own selves.” The question of what reading does for the human soul is an eternal one and its answer largely ineffable, but this hasn’t stopped minds big and […]test The post What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature appeared first on Australian Science.
+
12:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Ian and Joel Gold
Special thanks to Ian and Joel Gold for answering 5 questions about their recently featured book – Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness Ian Gold is the Canada Research Chair in Philosophy and Psychiatry at McGill University. […]

October 12, 2014

+
2:58 PM | European Science Foundation demands retraction of criticism in Nature, threatens legal action
The European Science Foundation (ESF) has threatened legal action against a scientist for calling an evaluation process supported by the agency “flawed” in a commentary piece in Nature. Amayo Moro-Martin, an assistant astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and an associate research scientist at The Johns Hopkins University, apparently angered the ESF with […]
+
3:00 AM | Contact: A Novel
By Carl Sagan Synopsis: In December, 1999, a multinational team journeys out to the stars, to the most awesome encounter in human history. Who — or what — is out there? In Cosmos, Carl Sagan explained the […]
+
12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
What an amazing week? The week of the Nobel prize in physics! How great is that? It’s really great, especially because the award goes for advancements in LED technologies. A team from the US and Japan share this prestigious prize. […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.

October 11, 2014

+
1:34 PM | Weekend reads: Senator loses degree for plagiarism; bad colitis poetry; fraud on the big screen
The week at Retraction Watch featured papers by a fake author with a brilliant if profane name, and the unmasking of fraudster Diederik Stapel as a sock puppet. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: John Walsh, the Democratic U.S. senator from Montana, has lost his master’s degree from the Army War College for plagiarism. Those allegations […]
+
3:00 AM | Darwin’s Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life
By Daniel C Dennett Synopsis: In a book that is both groundbreaking and accessible, Daniel C. Dennett, whom Chet Raymo of The Boston Globe calls “one of the most provocative thinkers on the planet,” focuses his unerringly logical […]
+
12:15 AM | Australia examines its strengths and sees its future in iManufacturing
Australia needs to play to its strengths and transition from traditional manufacturing into new areas of competitive advantage. CSIRO proposes the direction for such a move in its discussion paper Equipping Australian Manufacturing for the Information Age: iManufacturing – Is […]test The post Australia examines its strengths and sees its future in iManufacturing appeared first on Australian Science.

October 10, 2014

+
7:05 PM | After 16 retractions, management professor Lichtenthaler resigns post
Ulrich Lichtenthaler, a management professor at the University of Mannheim who has had to retract 16 papers for data irregularities, has resigned his faculty position. According to a terse release from the university (translated from German): Prof. Dr. Lichtenthaler informed the Rector of the University of Mannheim that he wants to leave the University of […]
+
6:42 PM | PNAS suffers ninth embargo break this year
The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) lifted the embargo early yesterday on a paper because of an embargo break — the ninth time this year they’ve had to do that. Here’s what went to the journal’s press list yesterday afternoon, days before the embargo was scheduled to lift on Monday afternoon: Due […]
+
3:35 PM | Cell line switch sinks PLoS ONE cancer paper
We’ve written before about how common cell line mix ups are in cancer research; according to a 2012 Wall Street Journal article (paywalled), between a fifth and a third of cancer cell lines tested by suspicious researchers turned out to be misidentified. Obviously, mistakenly studying the wrong kind of cancer is a waste of precious resources, […]
+
1:30 PM | Yet another study of widely touted cancer “cure” retracted
A third study of GcMAF, a protein being used to treat a variety of conditions from AIDS to autism to cancer, all without the blessing of health agencies, has been retracted. Here’s the notice in Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy for “Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF:” This article has been retracted […]
123456
167 Results