Posts

November 13, 2014

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6:47 PM | Preserving scholarly information: LOCKSS, CLOCKKS, and portico
While the switch from print to digital publishing has been embraced by younger researchers and students, older faculty are a little more nervous about the impact of this (nearly complete) transition.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:17 PM | Publisher sets high bar: Only articles “with lowest plagiarism” will be accepted
Maybe you can be a little bit pregnant after all. At least, that’s what the editors of the Journal of Innovations in Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences would have submitters believe. In a rather ham-handed invitation to authors received by a friend of Retraction Watch, the open-access journal “cordially” solicits papers with a helpful illustrated timeline […]
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2:30 PM | Lancet journal puts ICU paper on watch after authors acknowledge potentially fatal flaw
Lancet Respiratory Medicine has issued an expression of concern for a meta-analysis on tracheostomy in the intensive care unit that they published earlier this year. The paper, “Effect of early versus late or no tracheostomy on mortality of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis“, came from a group at Harvard, […]
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3:00 AM | Bee Time: Lessons From the Hive
By Mark L Winston Synopsis: Being among bees is a full-body experience, Mark Winston writes—from the low hum of tens of thousands of insects and the pungent smell of honey and beeswax, to the sight of […]
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12:15 AM | New global Malaysian studies network at ANU
A new agreement between the ANU and the National University of Malaysia (UKM) will deepen links between Australia and Malaysia, and boost the studies of Malaysia in both Australia and around the globe. Witnessed by Malaysia Deputy Prime Minister YAB […]test The post New global Malaysian studies network at ANU appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:00 AM | Alan Gill Reviews Alex Through the Looking-Glass: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life
Review by Alan Gill Alex Through the Looking-Glass: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos Book’s Homepage: favouritenumber.net Author’s Homepage: http://alexbellos.com Author’s Blog: http://www.theguardian.com/science/alexs-adventures-in-numberland Author’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/alexbellos Numbers are great. Everyone loves them. We’ve got favourite […]

November 12, 2014

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4:30 PM | “Significant” copying forces retraction of sternotomy paper
Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery has yanked a 2005 sternotomy paper by a group of researchers who plagiarized from an earlier article on the subject. The article, “The complications of repeat median sternotomy in paediatrics: six-months follow-up of consecutive cases,” came from a team at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester, England, and has been cited eight […]
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2:30 PM | “Know how to recognize pseudoscience:” Reader reveals how fish oil paper came to be retracted
After our post yesterday on a fishy retraction from author Brian Peskin, a reader who alerted the journal to problems got in touch to give us the lowdown. Ian Garber is in the last year of medical residency at the University of British Columbia. Here’s the story he told us via email: A few months ago, […]
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7:32 AM | Publishing our first virtual box of delights to aid the fight against heart disease
Sheer Heart AttackDiagnosis is key to beginning treatment for preventing coronary heart disease, the most common cause of heart attacks. One useful tool in the fight against this leading killer is magnetic resonance imaging, which allows the direct examination of blood flow to the myocardium of the heart. However, for this perfusion analysis technique to be the most effective requires compensation for the breathing motion of the patient, which is done using complex image processing methods. […]
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3:00 AM | STARMUS: 50 years of man in space
Edited by Garik Israelian, Brian May and David Eicher Synopsis: Starmus is an incredible series of talks, articles and recollections that celebrate the human exploration of space. It is the result of the Starmus meeting in 2011, […]
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12:15 AM | Scientists reveal secrets of insect evolution
Using genetic analysis, scientists have for the first time been able to conclusively establish that insects originated approximately 480 million years ago, and that they developed the ability to fly approximately 80 million years later. Published last week in Science, […]test The post Scientists reveal secrets of insect evolution appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Ian Stewart
Special thanks to Ian Stewart for answering 6 questions about his recently featured book – Seventeen Equations that Changed the World Ian Stewart is a professor of mathematics at the University of Warwick, England, and a widely known popular-science and […]

November 11, 2014

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11:00 PM | Mark Miodownik wins the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science
Congratulations to Mark Miodownik for winning the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books, which was announced on Monday at the Royal Society in London. He won for his book Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories […]
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5:35 PM | Overly honest references: “Should we cite the crappy Gabor paper here?”
We never cease to be amazed what can make it through peer review and several levels of editing. In this case, some fish mating researchers wrote an, um, love note to their peers that failed to be edited out by any of the many eyes who must have at least glanced over it. Here’s our […]
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4:39 PM | PubPeer Selections: Corrections in PNAS, PLOS Pathogens after PubPeer critiques; how old is too old?
Here’s another installment of PubPeer Selections: The corresponding author of a PNAS paper corrects it in response to critiques on PubPeer. Two months after PubPeer commenters raise questions about figures in a PLOS Pathogens paper, the authors publish a correction of the questioned images. Were claims that a group had visualized hydrogen bonds overconfident? How […]
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4:00 PM | ε-Polypropylene - "And now I've lost it."
Crystalline polypropylene (PP) has always been one of the more interesting polymers because it is polymorphic - there are multiple crystalline phases that can form. Without any special processing, the α- phase dominates. This is the one that melts at about 170 oC or so. In the past few decades, nucleating agents for the β-phase have become commercialized. I've not worked with any β-PP, but it according to literature reports, it melts at about 150 oC or so. If the crystals are […]
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2:30 PM | “Undeclared competing interest” sinks fish oil takedown by author fined for deceptive claims
The Journal of Lipids has retracted an aggressively negative review article called “Why Fish Oil Fails,” written by one Brian S. Peskin, whose bogus health claims have landed him in plenty of hot water in the past. Here’s the notice: The article titled “Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis”, published in Journal […]
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3:00 AM | Light Is All Around Us
by Wendy Pfeffer, illustrated by Paul Meisel Synopsis: Just stop and take a look—light is all around you! Light from the sun brightens the day, firelight flickers in the night, and electric light fills our homes. Do you […]
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12:15 AM | Somewhere in the Future … How Does Cyber Security Look Like?
Throughout this article, we do not plan to tell you some fictional story, but rather to provide you with very realistic predictions for the future of cyber defence which relies on current research and development trends and a way which […]test The post Somewhere in the Future … How Does Cyber Security Look Like? appeared first on Australian Science.

November 10, 2014

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4:30 PM | It’s happened again: Journal “cannot rule out” possibility author did his own peer review
Thomson Reuters’ online peer review system ScholarOne is having quite a year. This summer, a scientist exploited basic security flaws in how the system accepts author suggestions for peer reviewers to review a whole pile of his own manuscripts, ultimately resulting in the retraction of 60 papers and the resignation of the Taiwan minister of […]
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3:56 PM | As silly of a silicone product as you will ever find
Courtesy of Chemjobber, comes this silly idea: the Silibagz - a silicone bag that is pretty hard to take seriously.It's not as if silicone bakeware doesn't already exist. It does. So this is merely a bag instead of a muffin pan. And in fact, you can already buy silicone bags (which makes me wonder about the people behind this fundraiser and their supporters). What makes this funding effort silly are so many of the claims.Such as "We use platinum silicone exclusively, as we believe the only […]
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2:30 PM | “I kind of like that about science:” Harvard diabetes breakthrough muddied by two new papers
Harvard stem cell researcher Doug Melton got a lot of press last year for research on a hormone he named betatrophin, after its supposed ability to increase production of beta cells, which regulate insulin. Now, the conclusions from that paper, which has been cited 59 times, according to Thomson Scientific’s Web of Knowledge, have been called […]
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3:00 AM | The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures
By Christine Kenneally Synopsis: How biology, psychology, and history shape us as individuals. We are doomed to repeat history if we fail to learn from it, but how are we affected by the forces that are […]
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12:15 AM | “Ageing well” must be a global priority
A major new Series on health and ageing, published in “The Lancet”, warns that unless health systems find effective strategies to address the problems faced by an ageing world population, the growing burden of chronic disease will greatly affect the […]test The post “Ageing well” must be a global priority appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Scott Richard Shaw
Special thanks to Scott Richard Shaw for answering 5 questions about his recently featured book – Planet of the Bugs: Evolution and the Rise of Insects Scott Richard Shaw is professor of entomology and Insect Museum curator at […]

November 09, 2014

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3:00 AM | Have You Heard the Nesting Bird?
By Rita Gray (Author), Kenard Pak  (Illustrator) Synopsis: Woodpecker calls from a tree, “cuk-cuk-cuk.” Starling sings, “whistle-ee-wee.” But have you heard the nesting bird? In this book, we hear all the different bird calls in counterpoint to the pervasive quiet […]
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12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
It’s Sunday! Maybe some of you are not that happy for that, because it’s the end of the weekend, but for us it’s our time to provide you with a new editor’s selection for this week. The task was very […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.

November 08, 2014

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3:06 PM | Weekend reads: Scientists behaving badly; sexual harassment at Yale; help us find Retraction Watch bugs
First, a housekeeping note: We migrated web hosts this week, and while the move seems to have gone mostly smoothly, we’ve noticed a few issues: Comments aren’t threaded (even though we have them set up to be), categories aren’t properly nesting, and a small percentage of comments didn’t transfer over with the rest, the way […]
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3:00 AM | The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery
By Sam Kean Synopsis: The author of the bestseller The Disappearing Spoon reveals the secret inner workings of the brain through strange but true stories. Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune […]
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12:15 AM | Farmers should pay for invasive weeds – researchers
Farmers who use plant varieties that become invasive weeds should pay a levy to cover any environmental management costs under a plan put forward by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). The levy is one recommendation in a new […]test The post Farmers should pay for invasive weeds – researchers appeared first on Australian Science.
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