Posts

September 29, 2014

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5:54 PM | Optogenetics in neuroscience at Nature Methods
The optogenetic manipulation of cellular properties has not only revolutionized neuroscience, but this technology can also be applied to the manipulation of signaling pathways, transcription or other processes in non-neuronal cells. Here, we highlight some of the papers we have published on the neuroscience side of optogenetics.  Read more
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5:43 PM | Light sheet imaging in Nature Methods
It was only a few months before Nature Methods was launched in October 2004 that Jan Huisken and Ernst Stelzer had published a paper in Science in which they used light sheet microscopy – what they called selective plane illumination microscopy or SPIM – to image fluorescence within transgenic embryos. Simplistically put, this century-old technique achieves optical sectioning by illuminating a sample through its width with a thin sheet of light. In the last decade, Nature Methods […]
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4:05 PM | Mass spectrometry-based proteomics at Nature Methods
A look back at highlights in proteomics technology developments published in Nature Methods.  Read more
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4:00 PM | Analyzing high throughput sequencing data
Nature Methods has published popular analysis tools to make sense of the ever-increasing amount of high throughput (HTP) sequencing data. Some tools in this field have a short half life, due to pressure to always improve and innovate, others have staying power. Let’s look back over some of the highlights in our pages.  Read more
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3:31 PM | It’s happened again: Researcher appears to have peer reviewed his own paper
Although it shocks some observers every time, we’ve reported on the retractions of more than 100 papers pulled because authors managed to do their own peer review. Apparently, it’s happened again. Here’s a retraction notice in BMC Systems Biology for “Predicting new molecular targets for rhein using network pharmacology,” by  Aihua Zhang, Hui Sun, Bo […]
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2:08 PM | Ocean Plastic - The Truth and More Hype
I ran across a couple of articles this weekend regarding ocean plastics that are worth a read. The first is from Grist.org, entitled 8 Things You Should Know About Plastic in the Ocean. The amazing aspect of the article is that it gets it right. Or at least the text is correct. The pictures tell another story. They are still of macroscopic objects on beaches or in the water. But the text is correct. In brief, there is a lot of plastic particles out there, but we don't know how much, we can't […]
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2:00 PM | Scholarly articles and other sources about the Ebola outbreak
While there has been some high quality news reporting about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it is also easy to find vague, misleading or erroneous information about the disease and the outbreak.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:30 PM | Molecular Vision retracts three papers from University of Georgia group with error-ridden images
Molecular Vision has issued “full retractions” for a trio of articles by a group of eye researchers. All of the articles were led by Azza El-Remessy, director of the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy’s clinical and therapeutic graduate program. As much as that is, there might be more still with this case. The first […]
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4:00 AM | A Deadly Wandering: A Tale of Tragedy and Redemption in the Age of Attention
By Matt Richtel Synopsis: From Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Matt Richtel, a brilliant, narrative-driven exploration of technology’s vast influence on the human mind and society, dramatically-told through the lens of a tragic “texting-while-driving” car crash that claimed […]
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1:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews David Hand
Special thanks to David Hand for answering 5 questions about his recently featured book – The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day David Hand is Senior Research Investigator and Emeritus Professor […]
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12:15 AM | Marie Curie on Curiosity, Wonder, and the Spirit of Adventure in Science
A short manifesto for the vitalizing power of discovery. “Few persons contributed more to the general welfare of mankind and to the advancement of science than the modest, self-effacing woman whom the world knew as Mme. Curie.” So read the […]test The post Marie Curie on Curiosity, Wonder, and the Spirit of Adventure in Science appeared first on Australian Science.

September 28, 2014

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4:00 AM | The Physics of Star Trek
By Lawrence M Krauss Synopsis: What warps when you’re traveling at warp speed? What is the difference between a wormhole and a black hole? Are time loops really possible, and can I kill my grandmother before […]
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12:15 AM | Weekly Science Picks
New Sunday, new editor’s selection stories. This week brought the spring to the Southern Hemisphere and the fall to the Northern Hemisphere. It also encouraged us with a lot of new research efforts, studies and discoveries. Right now we would […]test The post Weekly Science Picks appeared first on Australian Science.

September 27, 2014

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1:20 PM | Weekend reads: A journal that will publish anything, even fake; Wakefield loses defamation suit appeal
This week at Retraction Watch featured revelations about legal threats to PubPeer, and a swift expression of concern for a paper denying the link between HIV and AIDS. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: Introducing the Proceedings of the Natural Institute of Science (PNIS), “the journal that publishes just about anything (real or fake).” Andrew Wakefield’s […]
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4:00 AM | Dog Sense: How the New Science of Dog Behavior Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet
By John Bradshaw Synopsis: Dogs have been mankind’s faithful companions for tens of thousands of years, yet today they are regularly treated as either pack-following wolves or furry humans. The truth is, dogs are neither–and our […]
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12:15 AM | Study warns swift action needed to curb exponential climb in Ebola outbreak
Investigation of new data expands information on spread of outbreak and case fatality rate. Unless Ebola control measures in west Africa are enhanced quickly, experts from the WHO and Imperial College, London, predict numbers will continue to climb exponentially, and […]test The post Study warns swift action needed to curb exponential climb in Ebola outbreak appeared first on Australian Science.

September 26, 2014

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5:00 PM | Publisher issues statement of concern about HIV denial paper, launches investigation
The publisher Frontiers has issued a Statement of Concern about a paper denying that HIV causes AIDS, and has launched an investigation into how the paper was published in the first place. The paper, “Questioning the HIV-AIDS hypothesis: 30 years of dissent,” is written by Patricia Goodson of Texas A&M University and was published on […]
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3:30 PM | Notice fails to get to the heart of cardiology retraction
This one is a little odd. A cardiology paper from China has been retracted because “permission to report these discussions was not sought nor obtained,” though it’s unclear what “the discussions” refers to. The person to whom the discussions are attributed to in the retraction, Ji Bingyang, is not an author on the paper, and […]
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1:30 PM | Deceased researcher has two more papers retracted
A late researcher in Italy who has already been blamed for image manipulation in a PLOS ONE retraction notice has had two more papers retracted, both from Free Radical Biology and Medicine. Here’s the notice for 2007’s “Redox regulation of 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis by β-carotene in human macrophages,” by Paola Palozza and colleagues: This article has […]
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4:00 AM | What’s in Your Genes?: From the Color of Your Eyes to the Length of Your Life, a Revealing Look at Your Genetic Traits
By Katie McKissick Synopsis: A crash course in genetics! Everyone knows that if you come from a family of brunettes, you’re likely to be born with brown hair. But did you know your hair color may […]
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1:00 AM | Science Book a Day Interviews Idan Ben-Barak
Special thanks to Idan Ben-Barak for answering 5 questions about his recently featured book – Why Aren’t We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System Idan Ben-Barak holds a BSc in medical science and […]
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12:15 AM | A Brief Talk with Andrea Morello, a Leading Australian Quantum Physicist
Let us introduce you a leading Australian quantum physicist and probably one of the most promising scientists in the world. His name is Andrea Morello. He is an electrical engineer and a quantum physicist. At the moment he is Associate […]test The post A Brief Talk with Andrea Morello, a Leading Australian Quantum Physicist appeared first on Australian Science.
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12:00 AM | #flashbackfriday Science Book a Day Interviews Daniella Martin
This week’s #flashbackfriday is from January 23, 2014. It is an interview that we did with Daniella Martin, who answered 5 questions about her featured book – Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects and the Last […]

September 25, 2014

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3:30 PM | Downstream effects: Comment on retracted narcolepsy paper retracted
The recent retraction of a paper in Science Translational Medicine reporting “one of the biggest things to happen” in narcolepsy research has claimed a bystander: A letter that commented on the no-longer-landmark article. The authors of the letter are with GlaxoSmithKline’s vaccine division. Here’s the new notice: Our Letter “Comment on ‘CD4+ T cell autoimmunity […]
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1:30 PM | Data questions prompt retraction of PLOS ONE cardiovascular paper
PLoS One has retracted a 2013 article on atherosclerosis in mice over concerns about the integrity of the data. The paper, “The Effect of Soluble RAGE on Inhibition of Angiotensin II-Mediated Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E Deficient Mice,” came from a group of researchers in South Korea. It purported to show that: partical (sic) blockade of […]
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4:00 AM | The Berenstain Bears’ Big Book of Science and Nature
By Stan Berenstain and Jan Berenstain Synopsis: Discover fun facts about the natural world in the company of the Berenstain Bears and their friend, Professor Actual Factual, the foremost bear scientist of his time! This treasury […]
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12:15 AM | Let’s Learn Japanese: Two Classic Video Series to Get You Started in the Language
Say the name “Yan-san” to anyone who’s studied Japanese in the last thirty years, and you’ll probably get a reaction of delighted recognition. It means that, inside or outside the classroom, they studied with Let’s Learn Japanese, a series of […]test The post Let’s Learn Japanese: Two Classic Video Series to Get You Started in the Language appeared first on Australian Science.

September 24, 2014

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3:33 PM | Tools for evaluating scholarly journals
In an information-rich age, one of my main functions as a librarian isn’t helping people find material, but helping them evaluate the material they find. In the past, I’ve discussed how publishers... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:30 PM | “Wide differences in the memories” prompt expression of concern for Poldermans paper
The European Heart Journal has issued an expression of concern for a 2014 2001 paper by Don Poldermans, the Dutch heart researcher who stepped down from his post at Erasmus University after being accused of misconduct. The article, “Bisoprolol reduces cardiac death and myocardial infarction in high-risk patients as long as 2 years after successful […]
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1:30 PM | Retraction, tell-all style, for breast cancer radiology paper
Here at Retraction Watch, we don’t believe in the expression “TMI.” But this case features a level of detail we’re not sure we’ve seen before. Acta Radiologica has pulled a 2012 article on breast cancer imaging for being a duplicate publication — a sin the retraction notice takes great pains to point out. The notice, […]
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