Posts

August 14, 2014

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3:50 PM | 5 Things Everyone Should Know About Washing Food (via Quest)
My friend, Matt Shipman, a science writer and public information officer at North Carolina State University writes in the below Quest North Carolina post about washing food (reprinted with permission): Everybody eats, and no one wants to eat something that … Continue reading →
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3:45 PM | Maine food boat shut down, and reopened due to food safety issues
One of the more compelling subplots on the was-AMC-now-Netflix series, The Killing, is one of the character’s broken relationship with her former case worker and parent figure – who lives on a house boat in Seattle. That’s how much the … Continue reading →
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3:32 PM | How can Anyone Know if Vitamin D Status is Optimal without Measurement?
Everyone should have an annual physical assessment. In addition to routine measurements (weight, height, blood pressure, reflexes, prostate exam for men, breast examination for women), blood and urinary samples are important tools to assess disease risk. Preventive medicine should be more than disease assessment and subsequent management.  Maintaining healthy nutrition levels is important for longevity.
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3:28 PM | SfN's new eNeuro journal will attempt double blind peer review
From the author guidelines: eNeuro uses a double-blind review process, which means the identities of both the authors and reviewers are concealed throughout the review process. In order to facilitate this, authors must ensure their manuscripts are prepared in a way that does not reveal their identity. And how do they plan to accomplish this […]
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3:13 PM | Medical School Orientation: A Third-Year Gives Advice to First-Years
To the incoming Albert Einstein College of Medicine Class of 2018, congratulations on your admission to medical school! Be prepared for an onslaught of information: advice, tips, good wishes, pointers, greetings, suggestions and introductions. This post is part of that mix, but it will be brief! If there is one thing I remember about the [...]
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1:53 PM | Everybody likes babies…and football…
Sometimes you read something and you just know that cannot be correct. I am not talking about the Daily Mail again (that’s part of its entertainment value); I am talking about peer-reviewed scientific publications. Some of those have been covered previously on this blog, but I found another nice one (well, was pointed to it […]
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12:00 PM | Naming That Tune
Previous research has shown that damage to the left temporal pole (LTP) is associated with impaired retrieval of words for unique entities, including names of famous people and landmarks. However, it is not known whether retrieving names for famous melodies...            Related StoriesDoes Walking Speed Predict Dementia?Can Better Health Care Prevent Dementia?Jane Pauley Opens Psychology Conference 
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9:36 AM | Fair food linked to foodborne illness in Montana
Missoula Health workers are investigating four potential cases of foodborne illnesses that could be linked to vendors serving tainted food at the Western Montana Fair. So far food inspectors say two of the cases are most likely related to the … Continue reading →
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8:28 AM | Ex-peanut plant head testifies on Salmonella
Wednesday marked Samuel Lightsey’s fourth day of testimony in the trial of his former boss at Peanut Corporation of America, Stewart Parnell, and two others. Peanut Corporation is blamed for a deadly 2008-09 salmonella outbreak that caused one of the … Continue reading →
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5:00 AM | Pulp treatments for primary molars
This new Cochrane review update finds no evidence to clearly identify one superior pulpotomy medicament and technique for primary molars. The post Pulp treatments for primary molars appeared first on The Dental Elf.

August 13, 2014

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8:33 PM | Unintended Benefits of Antibiotics: Why antimicrobial stewardship is difficult
We frequently highlight the unintended consequences of antibiotic use, such as C. difficile or adverse drug events, as reasons to discourage inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and advance antibiotic stewardship. Avoidance of unintended consequences is also a major factor in physician selection of antimicrobials. Anecdotally, physicians prefer to avoid clindamycin because it's linked to CDI. In an old study, Jessina McGregor and I found that physicians were approximately twice as likely […]
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8:21 PM | On "transactional" science
Important questions from Paul Knoepfler: In today’s transactional dominated world, scientists are spending an increasing proportion of their time basically fundraising. Writing grants. Honing grantsmanship. Doing experiments specifically for grant preliminary data rather than driven by transformative ideas. Working the philanthropy side of things. By contrast, transformative activities would include these kinds of things: reading, […]
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7:07 PM | Dying from heat at work, acclimation lacking
Failing to get the time to acclimate to a hot work environment can be deadly. That’s the message I took away from an item in last week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). “Heat illness and deaths among workers — U.S. 2012-2013” reports on 13 occupational heat-related fatalities investigated by federal OSHA.  Nine of the…
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4:18 PM | Be Informed, Vitamin D Affects Health, especially D3
Many of you will have heard low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.  The risk was 2.25 higher for individuals who were severely deficient (serum 25(OH)D3 < 25 nmol/L) and 1.5 times higher for deficient (≥25 to <50 nmol/L). To be clear, this is a correlative study describing a relationship. In a new report, Ford conclude baseline vitamin D concentrations do not predict mortality 
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6:30 AM | Does high sugar intake affect cholesterol and blood pressure?
It’s been suggested that a high-intake of dietary sugars is a cause of increased blood pressure and poor lipid profile. A recent systematic review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition investigates further. The post Does high sugar intake affect cholesterol and blood pressure? appeared first on The Lifestyle Elf.
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5:53 AM | Some Bull$%@t Happening Somewhere
Some Bull$%@t Happening Somewhere – WARNING: Colourful Language Very funny video just shared on the Safety Leadership Facebook page. Does this remind you of any recent safety presentations or inductions you have experienced. Important to remember that, even when delivered with the best intent, our words may be interpreted or perceived very differently. When we hear ‘spin’ or aspirational goal talk from leaders and safety people we hear what they want us to hear, but most of us […]
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5:00 AM | Periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis
This recent systematic reviews asks: Does periodontal treatment influence clinical and biochemical measures for rheumatoid arthritis? The answer is that there's insufficient evidence to know. The post Periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis appeared first on The Dental Elf.

August 12, 2014

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9:09 PM | Occupational Health News Roundup
Obama signs order requiring certain contractors to disclose labor violations; judge rules in favor of college athletes; Brooklyn hospital fined for workplace violence; and workers take wage theft to court.
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9:01 PM | Covert Operations vs. Public Health: What is the Government Thinking?
My attention having been riveted by Ebola, I missed this startling news last week: U.S. Agency for International Development sent young people undercover to Cuba to incite anti-government activism. Their cover was an HIV prevention workshop. This short-sighted idiocy was apparently aimed at making Cuba more “democratic,” by overthrowing Raul Castro, though that small nation [...]
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3:30 PM | When Prevention Fails: Life after an STI
  By Osefame Ewaleifoh, PhD/MPH Candidate As health workers our default position in the fight against sexually transmitted disease is prevention- as it should be. This focus on prevention influences everything we do. From health policy, to health education and health outreach- our entire vocabulary on sexually transmitted diseases is rooted in the prevention of […]
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3:18 PM | Building a Foundation for Healthy Aging: Omega-3s, EPA &amp; DHA
Despite headlines to the contrary, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) does not cure periodontal disease, or anything else. Omega-3s are nutrients not medicines. However, inadequate DHA intakes have health consequences. Omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA, are important for brain and cardiovascular health. From conception and throughout life.
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2:56 PM | Welcoming Einstein’s M.D. Class of 2018
Med school orientation is here again! How can it be happening so soon? Even though I’ve been at this now for decades (yes, decades), the same questions play out in my head: Do we have everything ready? What will this class be like? How will it do academically? How will it adjust to life at med [...]
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12:57 PM | Replication costs money
I ran across a curious finding in a very Glamourous publication. Being that it was in a CNS journal, the behavior sucked. The data failed to back up the central claim about that behavior*. Which was kind of central to the actual scientific advance of the entire work. So I contemplated an initial, very limited […]
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12:00 PM | Jane Pauley Opens Psychology Conference
"I'm all for fighting stigma. Just stop talking about it ... Speaking as a mental patient, the word makes me feel awful." In a candid and lively talk during the opening session of the 121st Annual Meeting of the American...            Related StoriesDoes Walking Speed Predict Dementia?Why Don't People Intervene in Domestic Violence?Is There a Link between Dual Trauma and Domestic Violence? 
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5:00 AM | Review found few good quality studies on treatment of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions
A non-surgical root canal treatment for periodontal-endodontic lesions was usually performed as an initial treatment step, but this systematic review found little high quality evidence. The post Review found few good quality studies on treatment of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions appeared first on The Dental Elf.

August 11, 2014

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10:33 PM | Women in the R00 phase don't apply for R01s as frequently as men
Sally Rockey: A specific issue that recently has recently created interesting conversations in the blogosphere is whether female K99/R00 awardees were less likely to receive a subsequent R01 award compared to male K99/R00 awardees. We at NIH have also found this particular outcome among K99/R00 PIs and have noted that those differences again stem from […]
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6:17 PM | On making progress
90% of the progress on my manuscripts and grants takes place during 20% of the time I am ostensibly working on them.
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3:27 PM | The Wonders of Vitamins
Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress contribute to age-related disease. Non-communicable diseases (NCD) share common pathologies associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial alterations.  Poor diet increases the risk of NCDs. Fruit and vegetables are important sources of folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, magnesium and dietary fiber. With the exception of women in South America, >69% of men and women do not consume recommended ≥ 5 servings […]
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2:28 PM | Checking up on Marriage
People may want their marriages to be happy but there is certainly no guarantee of that. According to one recent survey, thirty-nine percent of women and forty-one percent of American men aged fifty to fifty-nine report at least one divorce....            Related StoriesDoes Walking Speed Predict Dementia?The Judge in the Asylum (Part 1 of 2)Why Don't People Intervene in Domestic Violence? 
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1:20 PM | Public health’s biggest weakness, as illustrated by e-cigarettes
Recently, I was sitting in a meeting with some people, and during a lull in the conversation, they asked me: “Hey, you’re in public health. What is the biggest problem you face?” I paused. That’s a tough question. The Western …The post Public health’s biggest weakness, as illustrated by e-cigarettes appeared first on Public Health.
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