Posts

December 09, 2014

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3:55 PM | Einstein’s Research Efforts to Fight Malaria
Editors’ Note: Malaria causes over 200 million new infections annually. Each year, more than 600,000 people die from the disease. The WHO estimates that an African child dies every minute from malaria. There has been progress, however. In April, the U.N. reported that malaria rates for children in Africa are down by half. Still, there is much to be [...]
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3:27 PM | Cynicism, Paranoia and Stress Can Dramatically Impact Your Health
As the average lifespan of people in most industrialized countries slowly increases, we are seeing a sharp rise in new cases of dementia. According to World Health Organization forecasts, there are already the equivalent of 7.7 million new dementia patientss...            Related StoriesThe Geography of SuicideAs Former POWs Grow OlderLearning to Live Together, Jaffa Style 
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1:00 PM | Russian Government Charges LGBT Support Group For Suggesting Gay Youths are Brave
In its latest attack on sexual minorities, the Russian government has formally accused Lena Klimova of "illegal gay propaganda." Klimova is the founder of Children 404, an online support network for LGBT teens, who has come under fire for a...            Related StoriesThe Acid Test (Part Two of Two)British Doctor Goes Undercover to Expose Gay "Cures"Learning to Live Together, Jaffa Style 
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11:10 AM | Why Apply Drug Standards to Vitamin D Supplementation Studies?
What is a reasonable risk reduction goal to use in evaluating randomized, controlled trials (RCTs)? MedPage Today is negating benefits of vitamin D supplementation based on a meta-analysis which applied a 15% risk reduction target. Isn’t any nutritionally-attributable reduction in risk of fracture, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer beneficial? If pharmaceutical treatments fail to achieve a 15% risk reduction, are they dismissed?
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6:00 AM | Overdentures: scarce evidence to assess 1- versus 2 dental implant support
This review compared the survival of mandibular overdentures supported by 1- or 2- implants. Only two small RCTs were identified that suggest no difference between 1- or 2- implants. However only a small number of patients were included in these trials so the evidence is weak and more high quality trials are required. The post Overdentures: scarce evidence to assess 1- versus 2 dental implant support appeared first on The Dental Elf.
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5:28 AM | Toward Understanding Ibogaine
First Posted 12/30/2013 Paul Dessauer, Outreach Coordinator at WASUA, the Western Australian Substance Users’ Association, often adds insight to issues that come up on my blog.  He shared a few comments in response to my post about ibogaine, and at my request gave permission to post his remarks here. His comments include a summary of […]

December 08, 2014

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11:15 PM | Repost: Should I hire a postdoc or a technician?
This repost is via special request from some n00b Assistant Professor who has apparently lost access to Google. It was originally posted 25 Aug, 2008. The comments following a recent post touched on the newly independent investigator dilemma of who to hire first: A postdoctoral fellow or a technician? We'll leave aside the best answer […]
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6:48 PM | Seven Things to Know about the Global Spread of Asbestos
Asbestos. It isn’t just a word that sends a chill to homeowners renovating old buildings; it’s a naturally occurring mineral in widespread commercial and industrial use that still poses a public health hazard today. It’s still a big industry with big implications. Here’s a look at seven major things to know about asbestos, based on … Continue reading →
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5:19 PM | Hot Tips! Five Things to Know about Temperature and Food Safety this Holiday Season
As the temperature drops outside and things heat up in the kitchen, it’s important to consider safe food handling as part of your holiday baking protocol and other celebratory preparations. Keeping your friends and family safe from food poisoning is a good way to ensure that your festivities are memorable for the right reasons. We … Continue reading →
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5:17 PM | Public Health in the News – December 7, 2014
Global New data shows that a new Ebola vaccine seems to be safe and effective. A new study found that Muslims participating in the Hajj – the pilgrimage to Mecca – sometimes swapped illnesses and were more likely to return … Continue reading →
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4:27 PM | New FDA rules mean better drug info for pregnant women
Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration published a final rule that updates requirements for what prescription-drug information must disclose about potential effects for pregnant and breastfeeding women and their babies. And last month, the agency released Drug Trials Snapshots, which is part of a pilot project to help consumers learn more about the clinical trials upon which new drugs' approvals are based.
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2:53 PM | Learning to Live Together, Jaffa Style
Considering the political tensions and violent outbreaks throughout Israel and the Palestinian territories, it is hardly surprising that relations between Israelis and Palestinians is at an all-time low. Surveys show that Israeli-Jews regard Israeli-Palestinians (who are often referred to as...            Related StoriesThe Devil Made Me Do It.The Geography of SuicideThe Marital Selection Minefield (Part Two) 
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9:04 AM | Controversies in Science: A Tempest in a Teapot?
The American Society for Nutrition held its Advances & Controversies in Clinical Nutrition conference. It began with an exciting discussion around the benefits of dietary supplementation. If you are interested in another summary, see ASN student blog by Sheela Sinharoy. Dr Johanna Dwyer, Tufts University and NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, reviewed data NHANES dietary intake data. She emphasized that nationally representative data, NHANES, finds many Americans not consuming recommended […]
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5:59 AM | Dental implants: survey found that patients had high levels of satisfaction with implant-supported restorative treatment
This large Swedish questionnaire survey conducted on a random sample of patients achieved a high response rate (83%) . Those who had received dental implant supported restorative treatment reported very high levels of satisfaction (94%). However, 31% had experienced implant related complications although only 6% reported that these complications occurred frequently. The post Dental implants: survey found that patients had high levels of satisfaction with implant-supported restorative treatment […]
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5:11 AM | Opioid Dependence Treatment with Ibogaine
First Posted 12/28/2013 I’ve always assumed that stories about ibogaine curing opioid dependence were fabricated or exaggerated.  But I’ve read more about ibogaine since the drug popped up on an episode of Homeland.  The scene made me wonder how and when the hoopla over ibogaine began, and why it ended.  After all, people treat addiction with […]

December 07, 2014

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9:35 PM | Infectious Diseases and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Match
Here we go again. Another internal medicine subspecialty “match day” and another record (bad) day for ID. How bad? The previous record (set last year) for unfilled ID programs was 54. This year 70 programs went unfilled, meaning that for the first time ever there were more programs that didn’t fill than that did. Almost 100 funded ID training positions unfilled in a single year!We’ve blogged about this trend before, here and here, and discussed some of the reasons […]
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9:30 PM | Connecting Researchers to Industry Faster
  Salman Samson Rogers was a graduate student at Cambridge University when he first noticed how removed scientists at academic institutions were from companies, yet each often trying to solve the same applied science problems. Later when Rogers worked in a firm, he would sometimes unsuccessfully troll the Internet and scientific literature to secure the […]
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1:00 PM | The Case of Thomas Weir
As far as his Edinburgh neighbours were concerned, Major Thomas Weir had a reputation as a devout Calvinist whose constant preaching earned him the nickname of the "Bowhead Saint". According to some sources, people would "forty or fifty miles to...            Related StoriesP.T. Barnum and YouThe Case of the Brooklyn Enigma (Part 2 of 2)The Geography of Suicide 
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3:11 AM | Subjecting and Objecting About Risk
Subjecting and Objecting About Risk Rob’s new Book: “Following-Leading in Risk” is a MUST READ if you think you already know about Leadership. CHECK IT OUT I read with amusement the constant projection of safety activities as objective. This is one of the great myths of behaviourism (and BBS), that the observer and safety expert is […] The post Subjecting and Objecting About Risk appeared first on Safety Risk Blog.

December 06, 2014

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11:35 PM | Foodborne outbreak of streptococcal sore throat in summer camps in Corsica, July 2012
Our French food safety friend, Albert Amgar, sends along the abstract of this unique outbreak: An epidemic of streptococcal tonsillitis (SGA) in camps in children and adolescents was investigated in a camp in Corsica in July 2012. The majority of … Continue reading →
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11:17 PM | Saturday barf: Tiger, football, airplane
It is called barfblog. First up, Tiger Woods doing his best Ben Chapman impersonation on the first tee at his charity tournament — the Hero World Challenge — and he still made birdie. Next, Arizona center Carter Wood vomits just … Continue reading →
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10:55 PM | 9 sickened with E. coli O157 in Oct. 2013 linked to imported cucumbers served at Jimmy John’s in Denver
I’m sure university departmental meetings across the U.S. continue to chomp down on catered Jimmy John’s sandwiches, even though they have a terrible food safety record: 282 sick from Norovirus in Garden City, Kansas, in 2014; 29 sick from E. … Continue reading →
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10:27 PM | 87 now sick with Salmonella from sprouts
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports: As of December 2, 2014, a total of 87 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from 11 states.          Twenty-seven percent of ill persons have … Continue reading →
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10:21 PM | 15 sick from Salmonella in UK outbreak
Fifteen people are believed to have suffered from Salmonella after eating in a Cumbrian town, officials have said. Ten cases of the bug have been confirmed by laboratory tests and there are five probable cases awaiting confirmation. Officials say all those … Continue reading →
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10:13 PM | UK nursery still closed after three youngsters suffer from E. coli O55
A children’s center involved in an E coli investigation remains closed with no date set for its reopening. Blandford Children’s Centre in Black Lane was closed after three children who had visited it suffered from a rare strain of E … Continue reading →
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9:37 PM | ‘Conversations on the Couch’–Biases
‘Conversations on the Couch’ – Biases In this edition of ‘Conversations on the Couch’, Gab & Rob talk through how the various biases we all have. If we want to truly understand and deal with risk, we need to recognise that it is subjective and that our thinking about risk is biased in so many […] The post ‘Conversations on the Couch’–Biases appeared first on Safety Risk Blog.
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8:29 PM | Slowing bacteria’s ‘happy dance’ improves food safety
New nanotechnology developed by University of Guelph researchers that stops pathogenic bacteria from doing their happy dance might help improve food safety. In an article published this week in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Lab on a Chip Journal, the … Continue reading →
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3:27 PM | HN's commenting policy is a barrier to diversity in tech
I was browsing Hacker News when the non-indictment in the Eric Garner case was announced, so I submitted a link. It rose to the top ten almost immediately, and the following comment was posted [excerpt]: "Not exactly tech news, but it may prove to be one of the more pivotal events in American society." Five minutes later, the submission was removed from the front page, and locked. I was annoyed, but sort of understood since it was not tech-related. This morning I visited the site […]
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8:58 AM | Over 300 sickened: State knew Chobani yogurt was tainted months before recall, FDA says
Whether it’s food, automobiles, consumer goods, whatever – selling deficient product and trying to cover it up usually backfires. People and corporations are found out over time: so suck it up and go public early and often. In response to … Continue reading →
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8:20 AM | Science! MIT experiencing gastroenteritis outbreak
The boffins at MIT Medical need a refresher course in handwashing following an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis on campus. According to associate medical director Howard Heller, MIT Medical saw two patients with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea at the beginning of … Continue reading →
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