Posts

March 09, 2015

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7:30 AM | Limited benefits of cognitive bias modification for adolescents: is it time to move on?
Ioana Cristea reviews a recent randomised controlled trial of cognitive bias modification to treat interpretation bias in adolescents. She argues that this new study adds weight to the ascertion that there are very limited, if any, mental health benefits for CBM interventions. The post Limited benefits of cognitive bias modification for adolescents: is it time to move on? appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 07, 2015

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12:40 PM | Brain Recovery in Abstinence
If addiction is characterized by loss of control over the use of substances and behaviour and a severely diminished self control or volitional control over behaviour is recovery the regaining over control over behaviours? This study (1)  looked at the … Continue reading →
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8:48 AM | Systemic Integral Disorder: linking autism and schizophrenia?
Martial arts gradings call for my brood today (and well they should) so I'm gonna be fairly brief and introduce the paper by Haoran George Wang and colleagues [1] for your reading pleasure today alongside the concept of 'Systemic Integral Disorder' (SID) as a potential bridge between the diagnoses of autism and schizophrenia.I'm always a bit wary of grand over-arching theories or universal conceptual 'break-throughs' when it comes to autism simply because the inevitable hype which follows […]

Wang HG, Jeffries JJ & Wang TF (2015). Genetic and Developmental Perspective of Language Abnormality in Autism and Schizophrenia: One Disease Occurring at Different Ages in Humans?, The Neuroscientist : a review journal bringing neurobiology, neurology and psychiatry, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25686622

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March 06, 2015

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6:00 PM | What neuromyths do you believe in?
Many people, including a majority of school teachers, harbor important false beliefs about the brain. Are you one of them?Read More
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1:15 PM | Recovering Cognitive Control Over Emotions In Recovery.
The research we look at in the next two blogs asks the question – is cognitive control over emotions, lacking in active addiction, one of the main brain functions that improve in recovery? A core aspect of alcohol dependence is … Continue reading →
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10:20 AM | Hypovitaminosis D is frequent in Down's syndrome
"Hypovitaminosis D is very frequent in DS [Down's syndrome] subjects, in particular in presence of obesity and autoimmune diseases."That was the conclusion reached in the study by Stefano Stagi and colleagues [1] (open-access here) based on an analysis of their small participant group diagnosed with Down's syndrome looking at vitamin D status among other things. The comment about obesity potentially exacerbating vitamin D deficiency ties in well with another paper […]
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8:00 AM | Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing to treat PTSD in people with learning disabilities
There is now evidence of the effectiveness of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing for the treatment of symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In her debut blog, Rose Tomlins looks at a review of the evidence of this approach for people with learning disabilities. The post Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing to treat PTSD in people with learning disabilities appeared first on The Learning Disabilities Elf.
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7:30 AM | Cognitive bias modification for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents
Shirley Reynolds writes her debut Mental Elf blog on a recent meta-analysis of cognitive bias modification (CBM) for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. The review suggests that, on the face of it, we should not be investing in future CBM research, but is it that simple? The post Cognitive bias modification for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 05, 2015

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12:02 PM | Reclaiming Life
The cost of addiction and the benefits of recovery are clearly illustrated in this survey from last year. “Faces & Voices first-ever nationwide survey of persons in recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs was conducted by Alexandre Laudet, PhD.  … Continue reading →
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11:39 AM | Autism, heritability and 'proof of principle' genomic biomarkers
JAMA Psychiatry published a number of interesting articles recently, some of which have grabbed media headlines. "Autism is largely down to genes, twin study suggests" went the BBC headline covering the paper by Emma Colvert and colleagues [1] who, based on an analysis of twin pairs as part of TEDS (Twins Early Development Study), concluded that: "The liability to ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and a more broadly defined high-level autism trait phenotype in this large population-based […]
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9:49 AM | Persistent hyperlactacidemia in cases of autism
The paper from José Guevara-Campos and colleagues [1] (open-access can be downloaded here) is fodder for today's short post, and a topic that has not been seen on this blog for quite a while: hyperlactacidemia (elevated plasma lactate levels) and autism.Previous mentions of lactate and autism on this blog (see here and see here) were potentially pretty important; specifically, how elevated plasma lactate levels might (a) not be an unfamiliar finding for quite a few people on […]

Guevara-Campos J, González-Guevara L & Cauli O (2015). Autism and Intellectual Disability Associated with Mitochondrial Disease and Hyperlactacidemia., International journal of molecular sciences, 16 (2) 3870-3884. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25679448

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7:30 AM | Psychotherapies for adult depression: the things we know we know, and those we know we don’t
Patrick Kennedy-Williams highlights a recent opinion piece by Pim Cuijpers, which summarises what we know and what we don't know about the efficacy of psychotherapies for adult depression. The post Psychotherapies for adult depression: the things we know we know, and those we know we don’t appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 04, 2015

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9:41 AM | Asthma and autism: a spanner in the works?
As happens so many times in autism research, spanners are thrown in works. Take the paper from Ousseny Zerbo and colleagues [1] who concluded that: "children with autism have elevated prevalence of specific immune-related comorbidities". Nothing surprising about that finding based on the volumes of other research which seemed to have reached similar conclusions (see here).Then the spanner: "asthma was diagnosed significantly less often" in autism cases compared with asymptomatic controls. […]

Zerbo O, Leong A, Barcellos L, Bernal P, Fireman B & Croen LA (2015). Immune Mediated Conditions in Autism Spectrum Disorders., Brain, behavior, and immunity, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25681541

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7:30 AM | Psychotherapy for depression in primary care. Better evidence please…
Andrew Shepherd summarises a recent systematic review of the effectiveness of psychotherapy for depression in primary care, which contains a lot of data but leaves him feeling rather deflated. The post Psychotherapy for depression in primary care. Better evidence please… appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 03, 2015

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10:19 AM | Schizophrenia and the risk of fractures
The systematic review and meta-analysis published by Brendon Stubbs and colleagues [1] provides some food for thought for healthcare providers and others looking at the wider implications following a diagnosis of schizophrenia. "People with schizophrenia are at significantly increased risk of fractures" was the conclusion reached based on the collected analysis of tens of thousands of people diagnosed with schizophrenia compared with nearly 4 million controls.My immediate thought (and tweet) […]
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7:30 AM | Mini-Cog for dementia diagnosis in the community
Clarissa Giebel writes her debut Mental Elf blog about a recent Cochrane systematic review of the Mini-Cog for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias within a community setting. The post Mini-Cog for dementia diagnosis in the community appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 02, 2015

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3:14 PM | Recovery is Everywhere!
In our final blogs on the invaluable insights into the Recovery process given by the research and experience of William White we finish by looking at the rise of recovery communities in the US in particular and discuss whether this … Continue reading →
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9:49 AM | Systemic low grade inflammation and bowel issues in autism?
The paper from Katarina Babinská and colleagues [1] (open-access here) presents an interesting, if preliminary take on two potentially important issues linked to at least some cases of autism: gastrointestinal (GI) issues and inflammation (see here and see here respectively).Detailing the examination of plasma levels of a compound called high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a protein which has the apparent ability to 'bend DNA' and has some pretty potent immune effects [2] […]

Babinská K, Bucová M, Ďurmanová V, Lakatošová S, Jánošíková D, Bakoš J, Hlavatá A & Ostatníková D (2015). Increased plasma levels of the high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) are associated with a higher score of gastrointestinal dysfunction in individuals with autism., Physiological research / Academia Scientiarum Bohemoslovaca, 63 Suppl 4 8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25669692

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8:00 AM | Hand held health records increased awareness of health issues but no evidence of improvements in short-term health care activity
Health Action Planning was advocated in the 2001 White Paper and hospital passports are becoming accepted practice. But what impact are they having on outcomes for people with learning disabilities? Here Alison Giraud Saunders looks at a systematic review of published research on health records held by people with learning disabilities which looks at this question. The post Hand held health records increased awareness of health issues but no evidence of improvements in short-term health care […]
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7:30 AM | Searching for the cost of bipolar disorder
Bipolar disorder is associated with high economic costs...or is it? Chris Sampson reports on a new systematic review, which highlights limitations in our understanding. The post Searching for the cost of bipolar disorder appeared first on The Mental Elf.

March 01, 2015

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8:52 AM | Vitamin D status affecting autoimmune disease risk?
I want to bring the paper from Tea Skaaby and colleagues [1] to your attention for today's brief blog post and their observation that there may be: "a possible protective role of a higher vitamin D status on autoimmune disease". Autoimmune disease by the way, reflects a breakdown in communication and tolerance of 'self' whereby the body attacks healthy tissue.Their findings, based on an analysis of "a total of 12,555 individuals from three population-based studies with measurements of […]

Skaaby T, Husemoen LL, Thuesen BH & Linneberg A (2015). Prospective population-based study of the association between vitamin D status and incidence of autoimmune disease., Endocrine, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25666936

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February 28, 2015

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5:07 PM | IQTELL
So now and then I write about my workflow. Since email is the most important reason for diversion of my attention and often hard to handle due to the enormous amount of emails. This enormous amount of emails mostly caused by no or little email etiquette by some. Even email rules only helps a little. […] Related posts:Email Overload Evernote and “Read It Later” The Google+ Song
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