Posts

September 08, 2014

+
7:00 AM | Eight stories in film showing people with learning disabilities living their own lives
Living your own life in your own home is something most of take for granted. It’s just something you do. We don’t tend to think about community, or independent living, or planning, we get on with it. This is not always the case for people with learning disabilities. In this post, we wanted to link [read the full story...] The post Eight stories in film showing people with learning disabilities living their own lives appeared first on The Learning Disabilities Elf.
+
6:30 AM | Ketamine for depression: new review highlights the need for an RCT
Helge Hasselmann reviews a new systematic review of ketamine for depression, which highlights the need for an RCT to provide reliable data on the safety, tolerability and best route of administration. The post Ketamine for depression: new review highlights the need for an RCT appeared first on The Mental Elf.
+
5:47 AM | Your Brain On Coffee
In this video the effects of caffeine on the brain are explained. Want to know the half life of caffeine? Watch the video.   Related posts:Brain-healthy lifestyle Video Games Affect The Brain, Good or Bad? Deep Brain Stimulation for Depression

September 06, 2014

+
6:11 PM | Unpacking Recovery Part 5: Clinical Recovery Without a Clinic?
It can be somewhat controversial to suggest that untreated recovery from eating disorders is possible. Certainly, people have varied opinions about whether someone can enact the difficult behavioral and attitudinal changes necessary to recover without the help of (at the very least) a therapist and a dietitian. Nonetheless, we still hear stories about individuals who consider themselves recovered without having sought out external sources of professional support. When I think about untreated […]

Vandereycken W (2012). Self-change in eating disorders: is "spontaneous recovery" possible?, Eating disorders, 20 (2) 87-98. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364341

Woods S (2004). Untreated recovery from eating disorders., Adolescence, 39 (154) 361-71. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15563044

Citation

September 05, 2014

+
9:04 AM | Extremes of a self-limiting diet in autism
I'll draw your attention to three papers in today's post which represent the extremes of where self-imposed dietary restrictions can potentially lead in relation to the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Issues with diet - outside of use of diet as an intervention measure - are something which have been talked about quite a bit in the autism research literature (see here)."You look like a gangster"The first paper by Baird & Ravindranath [1] describes a case report of an 11-year old with […]

Baird JS & Ravindranath TM (2014). Vitamin B Deficiencies in a Critically Ill Autistic Child With a Restricted Diet., Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25112945

Gulko E, Collins LK, Murphy RC, Thornhill BA & Taragin BH (2014). MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy., Skeletal radiology, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25109378

Keown K, Bothwell J & Jain S (2014). Nutritional implications of selective eating in a child with autism spectrum disorder., BMJ case reports, 2014 PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24654242

Citation
+
6:30 AM | Can shared decision-making reduce health inequalities?
Ian Cummins reviews a recent systematic review of interventions designed to support SDM and asks: can shared decision-making reduce health inequalities? The post Can shared decision-making reduce health inequalities? appeared first on The Mental Elf.

September 04, 2014

+
4:51 PM | Dark Material: Reflections on a Suicide Conference
There is a great value in quality academic work carried out with integrity. However, especially in psychiatry, we must remember what, and who, we are working for. Understanding psychic pain requires more than measuring brain chemicals and gene associations. In order to help those who are driven to end their existence, we may need to question ours.
+
8:51 AM | Epigenetic processes and autism: focusing on immune function?
Although the title of this post talks about the science of epigenetics in autism, I'm actually going to be talking about two papers today, one of which also covers exposure to prenatal immune activation and what effect that might have on epigenetic processes in the mouse brain. This may also be relevant to at least some autism..."Beneath this mask there is an idea, Mr. Creedy. And ideas are bulletproof"First off we have the paper from Nardone and colleagues [1] (open-access) which, following […]

Nardone, S., Sharan Sams, D., Reuveni, E., Getselter, D., Oron, O., Karpuj, M. & Elliott, E. (2014). DNA methylation analysis of the autistic brain reveals multiple dysregulated biological pathways, Translational Psychiatry, 4 (9) DOI: 10.1038/tp.2014.70

Basil, P., Li, Q., Dempster, E., Mill, J., Sham, P., Wong, C. & McAlonan, G. (2014). Prenatal maternal immune activation causes epigenetic differences in adolescent mouse brain, Translational Psychiatry, 4 (9) DOI: 10.1038/tp.2014.80

Citation
+
6:30 AM | Placebo for depression: are some sugar pills better than others?
Joe Judge revels in a new network meta-analysis looking at placebo for depression published in BMC Medicine, which has been supplemented by a series of commentaries and blogs. Thought-provoking stuff! The post Placebo for depression: are some sugar pills better than others? appeared first on The Mental Elf.

September 03, 2014

+
12:01 PM | Negative Urgency Mediates Relationship Between Alexithymia and Dysregulated Behaviors
Following on for our very recent blog which described the neural mechanisms implicated in negative urgency we now look at at an article which attempts to  bring together some of our most consuming research interests by attempting to explain whether … Continue reading →
+
8:36 AM | An observation-based classifier for rapid detection of autism risk
"Keep clear of the moors"Among the many researchers and research groups admired on this blog for their contribution to the world of autism research, the name Dennis Wall is fast becoming a real favourite. Aside from mention of the words 'systems biology' in his profile at Stanford University, I'm particularly interested in the way the Wall research group are looking at trying to apply machine-learning approaches to things like autism assessment.I've covered a few of their past research reports […]

M Duda, J A Kosmicki & D P Wall (2014). Testing the accuracy of an observation-based classifier for rapid detection of autism risk, Translational Psychiatry, 4 Other:

Citation
+
6:30 AM | Mentalization based treatment for borderline personality disorder: a pragmatic trial but with statistical uncertainty
Andrew Shepherd summarises a matched control study that explores the effectiveness of day hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment for patients with severe Borderline Personality Disorder. The post Mentalization based treatment for borderline personality disorder: a pragmatic trial but with statistical uncertainty appeared first on The Mental Elf.

September 02, 2014

+
8:33 AM | The epigenetics of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?
"These data are consistent with evidence of multisystem dysregulation in CFS [Chronic Fatigue Syndrome] and implicate the involvement of DNA modifications in CFS pathology". So said the paper by Wilfred de Vega and colleagues [1] (open-access here) which, I think, represents a bit of a first for CFS with their examination of the possible role of epigenetic modifications in relation to the condition(s) [2].Ladies first @ Wikipedia I have to say that I was really quite excited […]

de Vega WC, Vernon SD & McGowan PO (2014). DNA Methylation Modifications Associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome., PloS one, 9 (8) PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25111603

Citation
+
6:30 AM | Interpersonal therapy and imipramine may be effective at reducing suicidal ideation in depression, but more research needed
Susie Johnson considers how effective conventional depression treatments are at reducing suicidal ideation in depression. The new study she summarises concludes that interpersonal therapy and antidepressants can also reduce suicidal ideation. The post Interpersonal therapy and imipramine may be effective at reducing suicidal ideation in depression, but more research needed appeared first on The Mental Elf.
+
3:46 AM | Unpacking Recovery Part 4: Are We All on the Same Page?
Another issue in defining and understanding recovery is that patients and clinicians may have different opinions about what recovery looks like and how to get there. Certainly, there is a body of literature from the critical feminist tradition in particular that explores how at times, patients can “follow the rules” of treatment systems to achieve a semblance of “recovery,” from a weight restoration and nutrition stabilization perspective, but feels nothing like a full […]

Noordenbos, G. & Seubring, A. (2006). Criteria for Recovery from Eating Disorders According to Patients and Therapists, Eating Disorders, 14 (1) 41-54. DOI: 10.1080/10640260500296756

Citation

September 01, 2014

+
8:26 PM | Explaining how negative Negative Urgency can be.
In various blogs we have suggested that one of the main aspects of addictive behaviours is to act as the result of distress-based impulsivity or negative urgency. Here we explore in more details what we mean by that term negative … Continue reading →
123
76 Results