Posts

March 01, 2015

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8:52 AM | Vitamin D status affecting autoimmune disease risk?
I want to bring the paper from Tea Skaaby and colleagues [1] to your attention for today's brief blog post and their observation that there may be: "a possible protective role of a higher vitamin D status on autoimmune disease". Autoimmune disease by the way, reflects a breakdown in communication and tolerance of 'self' whereby the body attacks healthy tissue.Their findings, based on an analysis of "a total of 12,555 individuals from three population-based studies with measurements of […]

Skaaby T, Husemoen LL, Thuesen BH & Linneberg A (2015). Prospective population-based study of the association between vitamin D status and incidence of autoimmune disease., Endocrine, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25666936

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February 28, 2015

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5:07 PM | IQTELL
So now and then I write about my workflow. Since email is the most important reason for diversion of my attention and often hard to handle due to the enormous amount of emails. This enormous amount of emails mostly caused by no or little email etiquette by some. Even email rules only helps a little. […] Related posts:Email Overload Evernote and “Read It Later” The Google+ Song
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1:30 PM | Could You Be Convinced You Committed a Crime That You Didn't Commit?
In a new groundbreaking study, researchers convinced 70% of participants that they had committed a serious crime. How did they come to such an astounding finding?  Read More
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12:04 AM | ME/CFS is real: confirmation if it is needed...
"Scientists discover robust evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a biological illness" went the title of the press release for the study by Mady Hornig and colleagues [1] (open-access) detailing an immune 'signature' and also possible staging of the illness.I couldn't help but wince at some of the media headlines reporting on this study as 'proof' that chronic fatigue syndrome / myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a real illness. As I've indicated before on this blog (see here) […]

Mady Hornig, José G. Montoya, Nancy G. Klimas, Susan Levine, Donna Felsenstein, Lucinda Bateman, Daniel L. Peterson, C. Gunnar Gottschalk, Andrew F. Schultz, Xiaoyu Che & Meredith L. Eddy (2015). Distinct plasma immune signatures in ME/CFS are present early in the course of illness, Science Advances, 1 (1) Other:

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February 27, 2015

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2:45 PM | Recovery is Recovery is Recovery?
Cross fertilisation among Recovery Fellowships I have unfortunately heard sometimes not very complimentary remarks about different recovery groups and fellowships which I have never found particularly helpful or useful in attracting the alcoholic or addict who is still suffering. The … Continue reading →
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9:37 AM | Hyperprolactinemia and risperidone use in autism
The findings reported by Yaowaluck Hongkaew and colleagues [1] (open-access) on prolactin levels being "positively and significantly associated with risperidone dose" in cases of children and adolescents diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the point of discussion today.Prolactin by the way, is the hormone most commonly associated with stimulating breast development and milk production in women. To quote from the US National Institute of Health (NIH) entry on prolactin: "There is […]

Hongkaew Y, Ngamsamut N, Puangpetch A, Vanwong N, Srisawasdi P, Chamnanphon M, Chamkrachchangpada B, Tan-Kam T, Limsila P & Sukasem C & (2015). Hyperprolactinemia in Thai children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder treated with risperidone., Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment, 11 191-6. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25653528

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8:00 AM | We need to empower & educate all stakeholders and provide person-centred care to move LD health care forward and reduce health inequity
Despite an increasing body of research evidence that demonstrates the ongoing health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities, there have been few changes in policy and practice. In her debut blog, Rosalyn Hithersay presents a paper that describes a series of workshops that took place in 2013 with the aim of addressing this shift from evidence to action. The post We need to empower & educate all stakeholders and provide person-centred care to move LD health care forward […]
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7:30 AM | Diagnostic test accuracy of first rank symptoms for schizophrenia
Raphael Underwood summarises a recently updated Cochrane systematic review, which aimed to systematically evaluate the accuracy of first rank symptoms for diagnosing schizophrenia. The post Diagnostic test accuracy of first rank symptoms for schizophrenia appeared first on The Mental Elf.

February 26, 2015

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12:22 PM | Family Recovery.
Today we listen to the research wisdom of William White in relation to family recovery, especially long term. Family recovery is much overlooked and not adequately supported long term in terms of “after care” which is incredible when one considers … Continue reading →
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7:43 AM | Carnitine and autism continued
The paper from everyone's favourite Saudi - Egyptian autism research tag-team that is Gehan Mostafa and Laila AL-Ayadhi [1] (open-access) on plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and serum carnitine levels in a cohort of children diagnosed with autism / autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is served up for your reading delight today.Regular readers of this blog might have heard me talk before about the pretty interesting research findings to come from this research partnership (see here and see […]

Mostafa, G. & AL-Ayadhi, L. (2015). Reduced levels of plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids and serum carnitine in autistic children: relation to gastrointestinal manifestations, Behavioral and Brain Functions, 11 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s12993-014-0048-2

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7:30 AM | Around one in five suicides across the world linked to unemployment
Claire Niedzwiedz summarises the Lancet Psychiatry longitudinal modelling study of suicide and unemployment, which uses the WHO mortality database to investigate suicides in 63 countries worldwide from 2000-2011. The post Around one in five suicides across the world linked to unemployment appeared first on The Mental Elf.

February 25, 2015

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10:31 AM | Analysing the salivary proteome in autism
The paper from Armand Ngounou Wetie and colleagues [1] (open-access here) reporting pilot results from a mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis of saliva in cases of autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with asymptomatic controls is served up for your reading delight today. There has already been some media attention about this paper (see here).It's an interesting paper for quite a few reasons; not least the continuing voyage of the analytical technique known as mass […]

Ngounou Wetie AG, Wormwood KL, Russell S, Ryan JP, Darie CC & Woods AG (2015). A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder., Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25626423

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7:30 AM | Compulsory community treatment results in no significant difference in service use, social functioning or quality of life
Rebecca Syed appraises and summarises an updated Cochrane review of compulsory community treatment and involuntary outpatient treatment for people with severe mental disorders. The review finds just 3 trials, which show that CCT results in no significant difference in service use, social functioning or quality of life. The post Compulsory community treatment results in no significant difference in service use, social functioning or quality of life appeared first on The Mental Elf.

February 24, 2015

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5:59 PM | Why Do So Many Psychologists Write So Badly?
An in-depth look at the fine line between bad writing and "bullshitting" in psychology.Read More
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2:12 PM | When does Recovery Become Durable?
When does sobriety for today predict sobriety for a life time? When does the risk of relapse plummet? How long do you have to be in recovery before this risk falls below 15% which is a figure used with other … Continue reading →
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9:38 AM | Maternal recall vs. medical records: implications for autism research
I don't want to dwell too much on the findings reported by Paula Krakowiak and colleagues [1] talking about the accuracy of "maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI [body mass index] measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery" but they are potentially important.With authors such as Krakowiak and Irva Hertz-Picciotto on the paper in question, those who […]
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7:30 AM | Parent Infant Psychotherapy: a gap in the evidence
Paul Ramchandani assesses the latest Cochrane review on Parent Infant Psychotherapy for improving parental and infant mental health, which finds little evidence to support the claim that PIP is an evidence-based treatment. The post Parent Infant Psychotherapy: a gap in the evidence appeared first on The Mental Elf.

February 23, 2015

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4:02 PM | Recovery Identity
We continue to mine the research wisdom of William L White on the next few blogs. William White is one of a growing number of researchers looking into recovery. This is an oft neglected part of research although we are … Continue reading →
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9:34 AM | Late, delayed and mis-diagnosis of autism
It's inevitable that with all the mountains of autism research published on a daily basis, certain themes will occur at certain times. My post today is reflective of one of those themes and how, on occasion, the autism diagnostic process does not run as smoothly as we would all like to think.I start this post with a link to an article discussing some forthcoming research to be published titled: 'The autistic pupils ‘traumatised’ by delayed diagnosis'. Describing the results of a […]

Davidovitch M, Levit-Binnun N, Golan D & Manning-Courtney P (2015). Late Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder After Initial Negative Assessment by a Multidisciplinary Team., Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25651066

Aggarwal S & Angus B (2015). Misdiagnosis versus missed diagnosis: diagnosing autism spectrum disorder in adolescents., Australasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25653302

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8:00 AM | Can staff mindset encourage a positive working alliance with parents with mild learning disabilities and encourage them to seek help sooner?
Parents with learning disabilities face numerous difficulties as we have reported elsewhere, but how much does the mindset of the staff supporting them impact on the quality of working alliances and the speed at which parents seek help? Here in her debut blog, Fawn Harrad looks at a study that involved both parents and their support staff to look at these issues. The post Can staff mindset encourage a positive working alliance with parents with mild learning disabilities and encourage them to […]
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7:30 AM | Lisdexamfetamine for binge-eating disorder
David Steele summarises a recent randomised controlled trial, which finds that (in the short-term) Lisdexamfetamine successfully decreased binge-eating behaviour in patients with binge-eating disorder. But can we trust this evidence? The post Lisdexamfetamine for binge-eating disorder appeared first on The Mental Elf.

February 21, 2015

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10:33 PM | Of Binge Eating, Age, and Distress: Child-Adolescent vs. Adult Onset Binge Eating
I’m embarrassed to say that my knowledge around binge eating disorder (BED) is sorely lacking compared to my understanding of the prevalence, correlates, treatments for, experiences of, and recovery from anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and OSFED (I still prefer “ED NOS,” but I’ll go with DSM 5 here). I don’t think this knowledge gap is uncommon; I’ve seen BED mentioned as a passing note in many an article, despite a general awareness that BED is relatively […]
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10:39 AM | Coeliac disease: genes, autoimmunity, gut bacteria and bafflement?
Some things in life really do baffle me. When it comes to this blog, nothing seems to baffle me more than some of the talk about the triad that is autoimmunity, coeliac disease and gluten (see here for an example).My bafflement continued upon reading the papers by Emilsson and colleagues [1] and by Olivares and colleagues [2]. Respectively suggesting that: "spouses of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-celiac autoimmune disease" and "a specific disease-biased host […]

Emilsson L, Wijmenga C, Murray JA & Ludvigsson JF (2015). Autoimmune Disease in First-degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals with Celiac Disease., Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25645875

Olivares M, Neef A, Castillejo G, Palma GD, Varea V, Capilla A, Palau F, Nova E, Marcos A, Polanco I & Ribes-Koninckx C (2014). The HLA-DQ2 genotype selects for early intestinal microbiota composition in infants at high risk of developing coeliac disease., Gut, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24939571

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February 20, 2015

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12:19 PM | Depth of Recovery?
Degrees of Recovery? Better than Well – I love this concept and reality and relate to it myself. This is a reality for many recovery people who feel they had an amplified recovery or in simple terms, people who got … Continue reading →
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12:05 PM | Are we jumping to conclusions in our understanding of psychosis?
Andrés Fonseca appraises a longitudinal study in people at high risk of psychosis, which looks at misattributing speech and jumping to conclusions. The post Are we jumping to conclusions in our understanding of psychosis? appeared first on The Mental Elf.
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8:43 AM | Behavioural sleep intervention for ADHD?
I was really quite interested to read about the study from Harriet Hiscock and colleagues [1] (open-access) suggesting that: "A brief behavioural sleep intervention modestly improves the severity of ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] symptoms in a community sample of children with ADHD." I had heard that these results would be forthcoming based on the publication of the study trial protocol [2] a few years back, alongside the trial entry listed in the ISRCTN registry […]

Hiscock H, Sciberras E, Mensah F, Gerner B, Efron D, Khano S & Oberklaid F (2015). Impact of a behavioural sleep intervention on symptoms and sleep in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and parental mental health: randomised controlled trial., BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 350 PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25646809

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8:00 AM | Advocacy support for parents with learning disabilities – is it cost effective?
Around 7% of people with learning disabilities are parents, but they face significantly increased risks of being involved in care proceedings being more likely than other parents to lose the care of their children. Here, in her Debut blog, Katherine Runswick-Cole looks at a study of the potential economic case for the provision of advocacy interventions to support parents with learning disabilities. The post Advocacy support for parents with learning disabilities – is it cost effective? […]

February 19, 2015

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11:47 AM | Recovery – a need for change?
A need for change? Addiction is a chronic condition but is treated as if it was an acute disorder. Treatment has become disconnected from the longer processes of recovery. Hence is there a need to redesign “treatment” to address the … Continue reading →
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8:39 AM | Metal sensitisation and chronic fatigue syndrome?
I have to admit that I pondered longer than usual over whether I should talk about the paper by Vera Stejskal [1] (open-access here) and the idea that: "Patients with CFS [chronic fatigue syndrome] and fibromyalgia are frequently sensitized to metals found in the environment or used in dentistry and surgery."It was't that I doubted that metals - certain types present in the wrong place or wrong concentration - can affect physical and psychological health and wellbeing as per the […]

Stejskal V (2014). Metals as a common trigger of inflammation resulting in non-specific symptoms: diagnosis and treatment., The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ, 16 (12) 753-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25630203

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7:30 AM | Marigolds or orchids? How easy is it to cultivate empathy in doctors?
Caroline Struthers takes us through a recent systematic review which looks at interventions to cultivate empathy in doctors. The post Marigolds or orchids? How easy is it to cultivate empathy in doctors? appeared first on The Mental Elf.
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