Posts

December 17, 2014

+
4:28 PM | Global CO2 emissions increase to new all-time record, but growth slowing
2013 saw global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use and cement production reach a new all-time high. This was mainly due to the continuing steady increase in energy use in […]
+
4:24 PM | Researchers Recipe: Cook Farm Waste into Energy
It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph. Guelph researchers are studying […]
+
4:22 PM | Orphan receptor proteins deliver 2 knock-out punches to glioblastoma cells
Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The scientists say when […]
+
4:17 PM | Study finds that employees who are open about religion are happier
It may be beneficial for employers to not only encourage office Christmas parties but also celebrate holidays and festivals from a variety of religions, according to a Kansas State University […]
+
4:15 PM | Hugs help protect against stress and infection
Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. Led by […]
+
3:00 PM | The Naked Brain
The human brain is arguably the most fascinating organ found in nature. Its complexity has been known since Santiago Ramón y Cajal pioneering work […] Read more The post The Naked Brain appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:The use of natural fluorescent proteins for studying life Smelling the taste Epigenetic alterations in Alzheimer’s disease, nature vs. nurture on the path to dementia
+
2:52 PM | Wordless Wednesday: Bath Time
+
2:51 PM | Advent Calendar of Science Stories 17: Kickstarter in 1921
There’s no way I could possibly go through a long history-of-science blog series without mentioning the great Marie Skłodowska Curie, one of the very few people in history to win not one but two Nobel Prizes for her scientific work– if nothing else, Polish pride would demand it. She made a monumental contribution to physics…
+
1:38 PM | Bruker Introduces BioScope Resolve High-Resolution BioAFM System
Bruker announced the release of BioScope Resolve, a biological atomic force microscope (bioAFM) that features the highest resolution imaging and most complete cell mechanics capabilities available for use with an inverted optical microscope.
+
1:27 PM | Kids Love Breaking Stuff
I visited SteelyKid’s first-grade class yesterday with several liters of liquid nitrogen. Earlier in the fall, they did a science unit on states of matter– solid, liquid, gas– and talked about it in terms of molecules being more spread out, etc. Looking at her homeworks, I said “Oh, damn, if it wasn’t the middle of…
+
12:13 PM | Environmental Remediation and Hazardous Waste Treatment With Graphene Plus
The goal is to test on field Graphene Plus, a range of graphene-based material produced by Directa Plus for water, soil and air treatment in case of organic pollutants' contamination.
+
12:00 PM | Mars, Molecules and Methane...
Curiosity's "Space Selfie," Wikipedia. Video: The TelegraphReuters - NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has found carbon-containing compounds in samples drilled out of an ancient rock, the first definitive detection of organics on the surface of Earth’s neighbor planet, scientists said on Tuesday.The rover also found spurts of methane gas in the atmosphere, a chemical that on Earth is strongly tied to life. Additional studies, which may be beyond the rover’s capabilities, are needed […]
+
10:15 AM | A nanoelectromechanosensing approach to detect cancerous transformation of single cells
Since diseased cells, such as cancer cells, frequently carry information that distinguishes them from normal cells, accurate probing of these cells is critical for early detection of a disease. Adding to these highly accurate methods for monitoring such alterations in single cells, researchers have now demonstrated a nanoelectromechanical procedure to relate the correlation between the mechanical stimulation of a cell's actin filaments and the electrical activities of ion channels to the […]
+
10:03 AM | Nanoscale devices for enhanced detection and treatment of brain injuries
Scientists have been studying possibilities of using nanoscale devices for enhanced detection and treatment of brain injuries ranging from mild to severe.
+
9:56 AM | Discovery opens door for radical reduction in energy consumed by digital devices
A new paper describes the first direct observation of a long-hypothesized but elusive phenomenon called 'negative capacitance'. The work describes a unique reaction of electrical charge to applied voltage in a ferroelectric material that could open the door to a radical reduction in the power consumed by transistors and the devices containing them.
+
9:44 AM | Pyramid nanoscale antennas beam light up and down
The new antennas look like pyramids, rather than the more commonly used straight pillars. The pyramid shape enhances the interference between the magnetic and electric fields of light. This makes the pyramid-shaped antenna capable of enhancing light emission and beaming different colours of light towards opposite directions.
+
9:39 AM | A gold nanocatalyst for clear water
Mixed nanoparticle systems may help purify water and generate hydrogen.
+
8:00 AM | Are You High, Noon?
High Noon If we consider “noon” to be the time at which the sun is highest in the sky then the time between successive noons is not quite 24 hours. Relative to our clock, our sundial will seem to run a bit fast on some days, and a bit slow on others. Because of this, [...]
+
6:30 AM | Celebrating the Silly and the Sublime: the Best Physics Papers of 2014
It’s tradition for various science media outlets to publish their lists of biggest scientific breakthroughs of the year right about now. And no doubt those breakthroughs deserve the attention... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
5:00 AM | Siamo vicini alla scoperta della vita extraterrestre?
Che cosa cercano gli scienziati quando vanno alla ricerca di vita aliena? Molto! La ricerca della vita extraterrestre richiede l’aiuto di astronomi, scienziati planetari, chimici, genetisti, per citarne alcuni. La domanda è: stiamo forse guardano nel posto sbagliato? Può la vita svilupparsi in altri modi che non abbiamo mai immaginato? In questo video, che fa … Continue reading Siamo vicini alla scoperta della vita extraterrestre? →
+
4:06 AM | The Turing movie
Last week I finally saw The Imitation Game, the movie with Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing. OK, so for those who haven’t yet seen it: should you?  Here’s my one paragraph summary: imagine that you told the story of Alan Turing—one greatest triumphs and tragedies of human history, needing no embellishment whatsoever—to someone who only sort-of understood it, and […]
+
4:00 AM | NGC 3227, l’emissione di radiazione multipla del buco nero centrale
Grazie ad una serie di osservazioni nella banda dei raggi-X riguardanti il buco nero supermassiccio nella galassia NGC 3227, Hirofumi Noda del RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science e colleghi sono stati in grado di rivelare vari processi multipli che sono responsabili delle emissioni di radiazione. I risultati di questo studio sono pubblicati su Astrophysical … Continue reading NGC 3227, l’emissione di radiazione multipla del buco nero centrale →
+
12:38 AM | The Big Bang for Children
How would you tell the story of our Universe to an 8-to-10 year old?Continue reading on Medium »

December 16, 2014

+
11:16 PM | Best Physics Videos of 2014
It’s that time of year, when we all look back over 2014 and reflect on all the cool science stuff that happened. Today, Jen-Luc Piquant has compiled her Top 20 physics-themed videos of 2014... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
11:02 PM | Guest Post: Chip Sebens on the Many-Interacting-Worlds Approach to Quantum Mechanics
I got to know Charles “Chip” Sebens back in 2012, when he emailed to ask if he could spend the summer at Caltech. Chip is a graduate student in the philosophy department at the University of Michigan, and like many … Continue reading →
+
8:00 PM | An Offer You Can't Refuse: How Extortion Can Enhance Cooperation in Society
Cooperation is a hard behavior to explain. Often it involves making at least a small sacrifice for the benefit of the whole, which superficially seems to be at odds with evolutionary pressures that encourage individuals to maximize their benefits at the expense of their competitors.Lots of theories exist to explain why cooperation arises in society, but a relatively new one examines how extortionists can lead to complete cooperation in a society. It's an idea I'm sure Don Vito Corleone of the […]
+
7:32 PM | Moving from science fiction to reality: chemically driven micro- and nanomotors
In this review article, scientists present the current state of research in the area of catalytic micro- and nanomotors.
+
6:58 PM | U.S., Brits update World Magnetic Model
NOAA officials announced today the World Magnetic Model (WMM), a representation of Earth’s large-scale magnetic field and an indispensable complement to GPS devices used by NATO, the United States and […]
+
6:49 PM | Why largest lemurs disappeared
Ancient DNA extracted from the bones and teeth of giant lemurs that lived thousands of years ago in Madagascar may help explain why the giant lemurs went extinct. It also […]
+
6:06 PM | How to fail as a skeptic
A few months ago, I wrote about my experience attending an atheist meeting.  If you don’t want to read it, I basically spent most of the time dealing with an argumentative jerk.  On the other hand, I expected that going in. Part of the reason I expected that is because there is a large amount […]
123456789
758 Results