Posts

December 18, 2014

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8:00 AM | Being Disagreeable
Scientific method: Defend the integrity of physics (via zapperz) Faced with difficulties in applying fundamental theories to the observed Universe, some researchers called for a change in how theoretical physics is done. They began to argue — explicitly — that if a theory is sufficiently elegant and explanatory, it need not be tested experimentally, breaking [...]
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7:50 AM | EU publishes nanomaterial guidance for employers and workers
This Guidance document offers an overview of the issues surrounding the safe use of manufactured nanomaterials in the workplace, sets out the broad outlines of preventive action and provides a practical tool for complying with specific aspects of ensuring workers' safety, such as risk assessment and risk management.
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5:00 AM | ORNL Microscopy Pencils Patterns in Polymers at the Nanoscale
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have used advanced microscopy to carve out nanoscale designs on the surface of a new class of ionic polymer materials for the first time.
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5:00 AM | Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding
ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more.
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4:00 AM | Rivelato un possibile segnale dalle particelle di materia scura
Dopo aver analizzato attentamente i dati nella banda dei raggi-X, un gruppo di scienziati dell’EPFL’s Laboratory of Particle Physics and Cosmology (LPPC), in collaborazione con i colleghi dell’Università di Leiden, ritengono di aver identificato un segnale emesso da particelle di materia scura. Questa sostanza, che finora è considerata puramente ipotetica, non è descritta da nessuno … Continue reading Rivelato un possibile segnale dalle particelle […]
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2:54 AM | Quantum Immortality
Forget nine lives; if one interpretation of quantum mechanics is right, the cat might have an infinite number of them.Continue reading on Medium »
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2:23 AM | Getting into the Spirit
“Autopsy found a large fluid buildup in the pericardial sac. By the time of admission, the effusion made it grow three times its regular size that day.”

December 17, 2014

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9:59 PM | Spider's web weaves way to advanced networks and displays
Searching for new ways to develop efficient, flexible networks, physicists discovered the designs of spider webs and leaf venation, refined across thousands of years of evolution, are worthy models for the next generation of optoelectronic applications.
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9:55 PM | Ultrafast imaging of complex systems in 3-D at near atomic resolution nears
It is becoming possible to image complex systems in 3-D with near-atomic resolution on ultrafast timescales using extremely intense X-ray free-electron laser pulses. One important step toward ultrafast imaging of samples with a single X-ray shot is understanding the interaction of extremely brilliant and intense X-ray pulses with the sample, including ionization rates.
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9:49 PM | Switching to spintronics
Researchers report on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature.
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8:13 PM | The 40th anniversary of Porin Karhunvartijat
Porin Karhunvartijat is a local astronomy club in city of Pori in western coast of Finland. Porin Karhunvartijat have an observatory and club house in the top of water tower of Ulvila, a small town 10 kilometres southwest of Pori. Porin Karhunvartijat was my local amateur astronomy club when I was a kid in late […]
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7:30 PM | The case of the disappearing-reappearing Martian methane
Methane on Mars is a huge deal, so much so that every announcement finding evidence for it in probe or telescope data gets a big media hoopla. That’s because methane is a common byproduct of life as we know it, though some non-biological processes make it too. (We’re pretty certain, for example, that the methane […]
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7:14 PM | Podcast: Manh(a)ttan Brings Nuclear Physics to Primetime
This fall, a new primetime drama appeared on the television network WGN America, featuring scientists at Los Alamos working tirelessly--desperately, even--to develop nuclear weapons during World War II, all while maintaining utmost secrecy. Manhattan draws on the rich underlying history of its namesake, the Manhattan Project, but steers clear of documentary tendencies. Whereas the premise of the show and several key figures are largely based on their real-life counterparts, the main cast is […]
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7:00 PM | Lens-free microscope can detect cancer at the cellular level
Researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes.
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6:55 PM | Microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale
Scientists have used advanced microscopy to carve out nanoscale designs on the surface of a new class of ionic polymer materials for the first time. The study provides new evidence that atomic force microscopy, or AFM, could be used to precisely fabricate materials needed for increasingly smaller devices.
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6:42 PM | Does the Scientific Method need Revision?
Does the prevalence of untestable theories in cosmology and quantum gravity require us to change what we mean by a scientific theory?Continue reading on Medium »
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6:34 PM | Choreography of an electron pair
The motion of the two electrons in the helium atom can be imaged and controlled with attosecond-timed laser flashes.
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4:58 PM | Hypertension medication that targets stress may help smokers quit
Smokers trying to quit often light up a cigarette to deal with stress. Now an interdisciplinary team of Yale researchers has shown that guanfacine, a medication approved for treating hypertension […]
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4:55 PM | Stay complex, my friends
The KISS concept ­– keep it simple, stupid – may work for many situations. However, when it comes to evolution, complexity appears to be key for prosperity and propagating future […]
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4:54 PM | Domestic abuse may affect children in womb
Domestic violence can affect children even before they’re born, indicates new research by Michigan State University scientists. The study is the first to link abuse of pregnant women with emotional […]
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4:28 PM | Global CO2 emissions increase to new all-time record, but growth slowing
2013 saw global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use and cement production reach a new all-time high. This was mainly due to the continuing steady increase in energy use in […]
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4:24 PM | Researchers Recipe: Cook Farm Waste into Energy
It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph. Guelph researchers are studying […]
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4:22 PM | Orphan receptor proteins deliver 2 knock-out punches to glioblastoma cells
Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The scientists say when […]
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4:17 PM | Study finds that employees who are open about religion are happier
It may be beneficial for employers to not only encourage office Christmas parties but also celebrate holidays and festivals from a variety of religions, according to a Kansas State University […]
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4:15 PM | Hugs help protect against stress and infection
Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. Led by […]
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3:00 PM | The Naked Brain
The human brain is arguably the most fascinating organ found in nature. Its complexity has been known since Santiago Ramón y Cajal pioneering work […] Read more The post The Naked Brain appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:The use of natural fluorescent proteins for studying life Smelling the taste Epigenetic alterations in Alzheimer’s disease, nature vs. nurture on the path to dementia
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2:52 PM | Wordless Wednesday: Bath Time
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2:51 PM | Advent Calendar of Science Stories 17: Kickstarter in 1921
There’s no way I could possibly go through a long history-of-science blog series without mentioning the great Marie Skłodowska Curie, one of the very few people in history to win not one but two Nobel Prizes for her scientific work– if nothing else, Polish pride would demand it. She made a monumental contribution to physics…
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1:38 PM | Bruker Introduces BioScope Resolve High-Resolution BioAFM System
Bruker announced the release of BioScope Resolve, a biological atomic force microscope (bioAFM) that features the highest resolution imaging and most complete cell mechanics capabilities available for use with an inverted optical microscope.
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1:27 PM | Kids Love Breaking Stuff
I visited SteelyKid’s first-grade class yesterday with several liters of liquid nitrogen. Earlier in the fall, they did a science unit on states of matter– solid, liquid, gas– and talked about it in terms of molecules being more spread out, etc. Looking at her homeworks, I said “Oh, damn, if it wasn’t the middle of…
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