Posts

September 19, 2014

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10:00 PM | Bassa e gialla
La bassa, giallaLuna sopra la casaCalma illuminata da una lampadaJack Kerouac, The low yellowIllustrazione di B. E. Pike tratta da The Wonderland of Science di J. C. Sanford, via nemfrog
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9:01 PM | Weekly Space Hangout - 19 Sept 2014
Missed this week's episode of the Weekly Space Hangout?  Then you missed out on hearing about possible new evidence of dark matter, the Rosetta mission's landing site, citizen science, and much more!
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4:34 PM | NASA's plan to find asteroids is falling short
The orbits of all currently-known near-Earth asteroids larger than the 140-meter limit set by the US Congress.  (Image credit: NASA/JPL) Our solar system is chock full of asteroids - millions of them.  While most are contained within the asteroid belt that lies between Mars and Jupiter, these rocks can be found pretty much anywhere in the solar system.  Many scientists believe that the majority of asteroids are composed of material left over from the formation of […]
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3:19 PM | No sedative necessary: Scientists discover new “sleep node” in the brain
A sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem has […]
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3:18 PM | Study shows how epigenetic memory is passed across generations
A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental stresses can […]
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3:16 PM | Scripps Research Institute Chemists Modify Antibiotic to Vanquish Resistant Bacteria
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a […]
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3:14 PM | Domestic violence more frequent in same-sex couples
Extra stress in same-sex couples may raise risk of domestic […]
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3:03 PM | Evolution of responses to (un)fairness
The sense of fairness did not evolve for the sake […]
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3:02 PM | Monster galaxies gain weight by eating smaller neighbours
Massive galaxies in the Universe have stopped making their own […]
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2:55 PM | Quick-change materials break the silicon speed limit for computers
Faster, smaller, greener computers, capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently available models, could be made possible by replacing silicon with materials that can switch back and forth between different electrical states.
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2:54 PM | New Hadrosaur Noses into Spotlight
Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs – a newly […]
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2:53 PM | Simple test can help detect Alzheimer’s before dementia signs show
York University researchers say a simple test that combines thinking […]
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2:51 PM | How Much Cosmic Inflation Probably Occurred?
Nothing focuses the mind like a hanging, and nothing focuses the science like an unexpected experimental result. The BICEP2 claimed discovery of gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background — although we still don’t know whether it will hold up … Continue reading →
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2:43 PM | Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.
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2:36 PM | Comparing Planck's noise and dust to BICEP2
In case anyone reading this doesn't recall, back in March an experiment known as BICEP2 made a detection of something known as B-mode polarisation in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This was big news, mostly because this B-mode polarisation signal would be a characteristic signal of primordial gravitational waves. The detection of the effects of primordial gravitational waves would itself be a wonderful discovery, but this potential discovery went even further in the wonderfulness […]
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2:05 PM | Kids with incarcerated dads more likely to be held back a grade
While proud classmates bring parents to school for Career Day, […]
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2:04 PM | Fingertip sensor gives robot unprecedented dexterity
Equipped with a novel optical sensor, a robot grasps a […]
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2:00 PM | On the no-miracle argument for scientific realism
In the last decades, the most popular philosophical defence of scientific realism has been what is known as the ‘no miracle argument’ (NMA; Putnam […] Read more The post On the no-miracle argument for scientific realism appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Searching for the lost causes Deflating truth (3) Intelligence testing: a history of a fierce debate
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1:31 PM | Il mio Pianeta dallo Spazio
My Planet from Space: Fragility and Beauty A phytoplankton bloom swirls in the South Atlantic Ocean about 600 km east of the Falkland Islands in this image from the European Space Agency (ESA) Envisat satelllite. Image Credit: ESA Il mio Pianeta dallo Spazio: Fragilità e Bellezza, or My Planet from Space: Fragility and Beauty, is […]
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12:28 PM | Startup scales up graphene production, develops biosensors and supercapacitors (w/video)
An official of a materials technology and manufacturing startup based on a Purdue University innovation says his company is addressing the challenge of scaling graphene production for commercial applications.
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12:10 PM | Uncertain Dots 22
After a long absence due to travel (some of which is discussed), Uncertain dots returns! Rhett and I talk about recent travels, how people going into internet-based physics outreach these days would probably do better to make videos than blog, physics in science fiction, celestial navigation, and as always, our current courses. Some links: –…
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8:00 AM | And that’s the Rest of the … Rainbow
Ring Around the Rainbow What a rainbow looks like when the earth doesn’t get in the way.
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7:26 AM | Experimenting with smartgel gelation
Scientists are experimenting with a new method of gelation. They can add nanoparticles or biomolecules with useful pH, chemical, and temperature sensing properties into a liquid, but incorporating those liquids into existing technology proves difficult.
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4:22 AM | The amazing, oozing Macrocat
There is a definite disadvantage to working at home.  In some cases, it comes in the form of a four-legged furry creature.  One that wants you to pet it.  While you’re typing. Today that creature was Macrocat.  The following is a series of pictures I took while I was attempting to work. Apparently the keyboard […]
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4:00 AM | LHC, prossimo obiettivo le superparticelle
La scoperta della particella di Higgs ha rappresentato una svolta fondamentale per la ricerca nel campo della fisica delle particelle, anche se molti scienziati ritengono che siamo solo all’inizio (post). Infatti, quando il grande collisore adronico (LHC) entrerà in funzione nel 2015, operando ad un livello di energia quasi il doppio rispetto agli esperimenti precedenti, […]
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1:24 AM | Throwback Thursday: Finding the Universe’s first atoms
How we discovered what the Universe was made of when it first formed.Continue reading on Medium »

September 18, 2014

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10:17 PM | Two developments in commercial spaceflight this week
NASA plans to turn to private companies for crew transport.  (Image credit: NASA) With tensions between Russia and the West remaining high, NASA is moving ahead with plans to find a homegrown method for delivering astronauts to Earth orbit.  The agency's own Orion capsule, designed to transport crews to asteroids, the Moon, and beyond is still years from completion, so in the interim it will be up to commercial enterprises to be our taxis.  A field that barely […]
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7:44 PM | Falaco Solitons: Particles at the Pool
While the season for swimming has already passed in most of the country, it’s still not too late in the year for some physics fun in the pool! If you’ve got a sunny day, a dinner plate, and access to a calm body of water, you can explore one of the coolest (and coolest-sounding) phenomena in fluid dynamics: vortical (or “Falaco”) solitons.If it sounds like I’m making up words here, let’s start with some definitions: a soliton is a kind of wave which moves […]
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7:38 PM | How a Planet Can Mess Up a Star's Looks
Note: An earlier version of this article appeared on Peter Edmonds' blog. Recently, beautiful photos of auroras have been in the news. These colorful light shows were generated by solar storms, and provide a vivid demonstration of activity on the Sun affecting the Earth. The pummeling experienced by our home planet is an example of our one-way relationship with the Sun: it can have a noticeable effect on the Earth, but the Earth has a negligible effect on the Sun. Further afield in the galaxy, […]
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6:51 PM | Solar cell researchers break the 'electrode barrier'
For decades, polymer scientists and synthetic chemists working to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells were hampered by the inherent drawbacks of commonly used metal electrodes, including their instability and susceptibility to oxidation. Now for the first time, researchers have developed a more efficient, easily processable and lightweight solar cell that can use virtually any metal for the electrode, effectively breaking the 'electrode barrier'.
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