Posts

January 30, 2015

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5:00 AM | Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing Scheduled for August 2-14, 2015
Computational scientists now have the opportunity to apply for the upcoming Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC), to take place from August 2-14, 2015.
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5:00 AM | Los Alamos Develops New Technique for Growing High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells
Researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that allows growth of highly efficient and reproducible solar cells from large-area perovskite crystals.
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4:45 AM | Throwback Thursday: Reaching Pluto
New Horizons is closing in on what was once our Solar System’s most distant planet. How did it get there?Continue reading on Medium »
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4:00 AM | La massa di Higgs secondo CMS
I fisici della collaborazione CMS hanno pubblicato la raccolta più ampia dei risultati ottenuti sulle proprietà del bosone di Higgs. I dati, che si riferiscono agli esperimenti condotti tra il 2011 e il 2012 e allo studio dello spin e della parità, suggeriscono che al momento la particella non può essere distinta dalle previsioni teoriche … Continue reading La massa di Higgs secondo CMS →

January 29, 2015

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11:24 PM | Charles Hard Townes, 1915-2015
Yesterday I awoke to the news that Charles Hard Townes, a 1964 Nobel laureate for fundamental work on maser and laser physics, had died on Tuesday, January 27. In six months and a day, he would have turned 100 years old, but you can still think of this as his centennial year, in my opinion. […]
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11:04 PM | Impending Doom
It’s only a matter of time before another star has a close encounter with our Solar System. How long do we have?Continue reading on Medium »
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4:00 PM | Three Physics Phenomena From a Winter Wonderland
On Tuesday the "storm of the century" rolled through the northeast of the United States and despite it not living up to the doom and gloom predictions, many places, including here in DC, received a decent amount of snow and ice.While walking through my local winter wonderland, I made a few observations which unsurprisingly all come back to physics. Here are three physics phenomena from snow and ice.1. Ice is slipperyThis seems an exceedingly obvious place to start, but it turns out the […]
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3:47 PM | Graphene 3D Lab Ready for Graphene-Enhanced Filament Production
Graphene 3D Lab Inc. has announced that it has received and successfully assembled an industrial scale thermoplastic extruder line to be used in the production of conductive graphene filament. The equipment, which has a production capacity of up to 10 kg per hour of 3D printer filament, is now operational and has been tested for the production of specialty filaments.
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2:59 PM | Light: Going Beyond the Bulb
2015 has been declared the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (#IYL2015) by the United Nations. Working for NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based telescope that observes X-rays from the Universe, we talk about light all the time. X-rays are a kind of light. There are many different kinds of light that make up the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to gamma rays, but only one that human eyes can detect naturally (known as optical, or visible, […]
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2:58 PM | The Problem with (and Promise of) Word Problems
Math with Bad Drawings has a post about “word problems” that will sound very familiar to anyone who’s taught introductory physics. As he notes, the problem with “word problems” for math-phobic students is that it requires translating words into symbols, and then using the symbols to select a procedure. It adds a step to what…
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2:42 PM | DIADEMS - finding the sensor behind the sparkle
By modifying the structure of a diamond crystal, the DIADEMS project creates a new material that could be used in applications, from the creation of smart medicines to the next generation computers.
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2:37 PM | Feelings of loneliness and depression linked to binge-watching television
It seems harmless: getting settled in for a night of marathon session for a favorite TV show, like House of Cards. But why do we binge-watch TV, and can it […]
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2:34 PM | Facelift surgery after massive weight loss poses challenges
Patients undergoing bariatric surgery for severe obesity are often left with excess, sagging skin affecting all areas of the body–including the face. The unique challenges of facelift surgery in this […]
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2:34 PM | Paper-based nanoparticle test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva
Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The paper-based disposable device will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.
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2:32 PM | Eye-tracking technology detects concussions, head injury severity
New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. Neuroscientists and concussion experts from NYU […]
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2:31 PM | Gender roles: Men and women are not so different after all
Gender is a large part of our identity that is often defined by our psychological differences as men and women. Not surprisingly, those differences are reflected in many gender stereotypes […]
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2:30 PM | Diet and nutrition essential for mental health
Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin […]
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2:23 PM | Sex Differences Found in Brain Mechanisms Important for Learning
Women tend to become addicted to drugs and relapse faster than men, though the biological reasons are not completely clear. Now, investigators at the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research […]
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2:22 PM | Precision Medicine Transforms Cancer Treatment
In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced a new precision medicine initiative to work on finding a cure for cancer and other diseases. Howard L. Kaufman, a […]
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2:21 PM | Common Pesticide May Increase Risk of ADHD
A commonly used pesticide may alter the development of the brain’s dopamine system — responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function – and increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity […]
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2:20 PM | Anxiety associated with greater cognitive decline in those at risk for Alzheimer’s
Older persons at increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease because of accumulated amyloid-beta plaques experience more rapid cognitive decline if they also have elevated anxiety symptoms, according to new research published […]
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2:18 PM | Immune cells are an ally, not enemy, in battle against Alzheimer’s
Beta-amyloid is a sticky protein that aggregates and forms small plaques in the brains of the elderly and is thought to be a cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Because specialized immune […]
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9:19 AM | The anti-aging benefits of environmental enrichment
Aging is not just an irreversible disturbance of homeostasis but it can also be considered as a process where biological and functional complexity is progressively diminishing. With the passage of […]
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9:17 AM | The nanomedicines of the future will build on quantum chemistry
Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow's cancer drugs.
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8:38 AM | 3D printed 'smart glue' leverages DNA assembly at the macroscale
Designing systems that build themselves is one of the great dreams of nanotechnology researchers, and they are taking great strides towards developing such 'bottom-up' nanotechnology fabrication techniques. Fabrication processes based on DNA might change this: DNA origami have been heralded as a potential breakthrough for the creation of nanoscale devices. Researchers have now developed methods to assemble DNA-functionalized microparticles into a colloidal gel, and to extrude this gel with a 3D […]
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8:25 AM | Park NX-Bio, the only 3-in-1 Imaging Nanoscale Tool Available for Life Science Researchers
Park Systems, a leading manufacturer of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoscale metrology products, proudly introduces Park NX-Bio, a powerful 3-in-1 bio-research tool that uniquely combines scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with AFM and an inverted optical microscope (IOM) on the same platform.
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5:00 AM | New Clues About a Brain Protein with High Affinity for Valium
High-resolution structure revealed by the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven Lab could lead to design of more effective drugs with fewer side effects.
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4:00 AM | Uno strano lampo radio di origine extragalattica
I radioastronomi hanno osservato uno strano fenomeno “colto in flagrante”: stiamo parlando di un cosiddetto radio burst veloce (Fast Radio Burst, FRB). L’evento può essere descritto come una sorta di lampo di onde radio, ben definito e di brevissima durata, che si ritiene provenga da una sorgente ignota di origine extragalattica. Questo ‘nuovo’ fenomeno, che dura qualche … Continue reading Uno strano lampo radio di origine extragalattica […]

January 28, 2015

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5:30 PM | Dry adhesives controlled by a magnetic field
A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field.
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5:11 PM | Podcast: Which Way to Mercury?
Mercury has a big month coming up, with the 40th anniversary of Mariner 10's final flyby on March 16th and the planned conclusion of the MESSENGER mission a couple of weeks later.  To date, these are the only two spacecraft to have visited the innermost planet in our solar system, largely because it's fiendishly difficult to get there and operate in orbit so close to the Sun.  Nevertheless, Mercury remains an exciting destination for planetary exploration, holding clues to the […]
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