Posts

September 22, 2014

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2:33 AM | How anti-vaccination is like a nuclear bomb
I’m not sure that anything fills me with despair more than the trend of parents refusing to vaccinate their children. A couple of weeks ago, an article in The Hollywood Reporter described how affluent Hollywood schools are experiencing outbreaks of … Continue reading →
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1:13 AM | Planck Speaks: Bad News for Primordial Gravitational Waves?
Ever since we all heard the exciting news that the BICEP2 experiment had detected “B-mode” polarization in the cosmic microwave background — just the kind we would expect to be produced by cosmic inflation at a high energy scale — … Continue reading →

September 21, 2014

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11:42 PM | Physicists on Ice: Exploring the Physics of Curling
Last Friday I joined a contingent of Caltech physicists (including the Time Lord) for an afternoon of curling — yeah, you heard me, curling — in honor of Caltech theoretical physicist... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10:50 PM | Weekend Diversion: The Greatest Chatroulette of All-Time
There’s nothing like signing up for a random chat… and winding up with an improv serenade!Continue reading on Medium »
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10:38 PM | Il più grande robot del mondo
Oltre ai problemi di pubblicazione, la gestazione del post è stata sicuramente la più complessa di tutta la serie dedicata ad "Astro Boy". Il post che segue ha subito almeno un paio di riscritture a partire da un testo di base iniziale, che vi posso assicurare alla fine è risultato completamente stravolto. La versione alla fine pubblicata non mi ha comunque soddisfatto appieno, ma se avessi continuato a limare, probabilmente non avrebbe visto mai la luce e non avevo altre […]
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5:30 PM | Google Scholar Irregularities
Google Scholar is definitely missing citations to my papers. The cited-by results for arXiv:1401.7254 on Google Scholar and on INSPIRE are completely nonoverlapping. Google Scholar can tell that arXiv:1409.4708 cites arXiv:1110.3845 but not that it cites arXiv:1405.2390. Meanwhile, the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System catches both. This would be a really petty thing to complain about, […]
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5:22 PM | Idiosyncratic Thinking: a computer heuristics lecture
http://t.co/7JB3CPaQt9 #Feynman Richard Feynman, Winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics, gives us an insightful lecture about computer heuristics: how computers work, how they file information, how they handle data, how they use their information in allocated processing in a finite amount of time to solve problems and how they actually compute values of interest to human beings. These topics are essential in the study of what processes reduce the amount of work done in solving a particular […]
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4:38 PM | A Packing Pessimization Problem
What convex centrally symmetric shape is worst at tiling the plane with high density?
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4:31 PM | New formulation leads to improved liquid battery
Cheaper, longer-lasting materials could enable batteries that make wind and solar energy more competitive.
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4:16 PM | Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads
Diamond nanothreads are likely to have extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers
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4:10 PM | Engineered proteins stick like glue - even in water
New adhesives based on mussel proteins could be useful for naval or medical applications.
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4:06 PM | Uncovering the forbidden side of molecules
Researchers have succeeded in observing the 'forbidden' infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time. These extremely weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology.
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2:00 PM | MI weekly selection #93
Antarctic ice growing at record-setting pace. Antarctic sea ice is on track to reach a record high this month while Arctic ice has decreased […] Read more The post MI weekly selection #93 appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:The tough aspects of walking on sand Carnivorous plants inspire novel liquid repellent surfaces Flexible needles as the future for cancer treatment
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12:57 PM | The Pleasure of Working Things Through
My bedtime reading for the past week or so has been Steven Gould’s Exo (excerpt at Tor). This is the fourth book in the Jumper series (not counting the movie tie-in novel), and ordinarily wouldn’t be worth much of a review, because if you haven’t read the first three, this book won’t make a lick…

September 20, 2014

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7:00 PM | The many faces of compact stars
In this school, we want to give a broad overview of all the possible manifestations of compact objects in different astrophysical scenarios. For this purpose, a large list of topics will be addressed during the meeting by renowned international experts: accretion theory, binaries, neutron stars thermal emission, equation of states, microquasar jets, neutron star cooling, radio-pulsars, magnetospheres, compact stars as […]
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6:09 PM | Adventures in the Sophomoric
Yesternight, I went memory-road-tripping through my blog archives. One of the things I realized, apart from how amazingly enthusiastic I was for the blogging form back in 2007, was how much I reviled my sophomore-year university physics classes. At the time, they were unpleasant; in retrospect, they were deleterious. The worst was the relativity class, […]
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5:52 PM | Solving the metal problem: new polymer used in organic solar cells to allow wide use of metal cathodes, improve efficiency
Organic solar cells (OSC) are an exciting next-generation option for photovoltaics.  The main advantage is that they’re cheap, easily processed using solution-based methods, which opens up many innovative applications – printable cells, even solar paint! The main issue holding OSCs back is … Continue reading →

Page, Z., Liu, Y., Duzhko, V., Russell, T. & Emrick, T. (2014). Fulleropyrrolidine interlayers: Tailoring electrodes to raise organic solar cell efficiency, Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1255826

Citation
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5:30 PM | Joint WISH + First galaxies International Workshop
WISH (Wide-field Infrared Surveyor for High-redshift) is a space science mission concept whose primary goal is to study the first galaxies in the early universe. WISH will be a Japan-led 1.5m telescope equipped with a 900 arcmin2 wide-field, Near-IR, 0.2-0.5arcsec FWHM, camera that would fly by ~2020 in order to conduct unique ultra-deep and wide-area […]
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3:23 PM | Il valore estetico di un dipinto
Il dolore è modulato da fattori cognitivi, tra cui l'attenzione e le emozioni. In questo studio abbiamo valutato l'effetto di distrazione dell'apprezzamento estetico sul dolore soggettivo (...) indotto da stimolazione laser della mano sinistra su 12 volontari in salute. I soggetti sono stati stimolati con il laser in assenza di altri stimoli esterni e mentre guardavano diversi dipinti che avevano precedentemente classificato come belli, neutrali o brutti. La visione dei dipinti […]
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3:00 PM | The Variable Sky: from Tiny Variations to Big Explosions
The Annual Meeting of the Astronomische Gesellschaft will be held from Sep. 22 through 26, 2014 at premises of the University of Bamberg. The meeting is organized by the Dr. Remeis Observatory Bamberg, Astronomical Institute & Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP) of the University Erlangen-Nürnberg on behalf of the German Astronomical Society. The plenary sessions […]
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12:30 PM | The Starmus Festival
Since the very first Homo Sapiens looked up at a star-filled sky we have been awestruck by the vastness of the cosmos. Even today we remain humbled by the sheer immensity of space, especially as through our progress in physics and astronomy, we are now aware of the tremendous distances involved – even to our […]
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10:10 AM | Northeastern unveils state-of-the-art 3D nanoscale printing system
Uni­ver­sity leaders and nan­otech­nology researchers joined rep­re­sen­ta­tives from industry and gov­ern­ment agen­cies at Northeastern's George J. Kostas Research Insti­tute for Home­land Secu­rity to unveil NanoOPS, a nanoscale printing system with the poten­tial to trans­form nanoman­u­fac­turing and spur inno­va­tion in a range of areas including elec­tronics, med­i­cine, and energy storage.
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9:40 AM | Physics Week in Review: September 20, 2014
On the latest episode of the Know Brainer Podcast, I chatted with host Christina Ochoa about Self- Experimentation, Time and Identity, and Body Fluids in Art. It’s available on iTunes or via... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:00 AM | Exoplanets with JWST – MIRI
The workshop is aimed on discussing the capabilities and techniques for characterising exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope, in particular with its MIRI instrument. The discussions will cover both transit spectroscopy and direct imaging, covering giant planets to rocky planets and their atmospheres. Poster of the workshopArchiviato in:Astroagenda, Astronomia, Scienze planetarie, Spazio Tagged: astronomy […]
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5:20 AM | Graphene platform as nanosized hydrogen generator
Researchers have created a small scale 'hydrogen generator' that uses light and a two-dimensional graphene platform to boost production of the hard-to-make element.
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4:00 AM | Fundamental Issues of the Standard Cosmological Model
The Planck Satellite measurement have increased the accuracy of cosmological observations to a level which allows to constrain cosmological models with unprecedented precision. The aim of this workshop is to discuss the implications of these recent results combined with other (i.e. Planck, but also WMAP, galaxy surveys, SNIa data…) on models that aim at describing […]
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2:47 AM | Writing Activity Metric Tracking
I'm playing around with tracking metrics on my writing activities today.  Clearly I need to enhance my charting presentation skills, but the information here is kind of interesting to me.  It's about me, so of course it is, but it's interesting to think about in terms of why a writing log is useful as well.  Here's what I learned  As the semester has ramped up, I've been doing more writing on EM homework and less on EM notes in preparation for class.  That's not a […]

September 19, 2014

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10:58 PM | Ask Ethan #54: What’s the Earliest Signal from the Universe?
Is there a way to see past the barrier the Universe puts up before it became transparent to light?Continue reading on Medium »
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10:34 PM | Research predicts possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month
Rate of rise in cases significantly increased in August in […]
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10:00 PM | Bassa e gialla
La bassa, giallaLuna sopra la casaCalma illuminata da una lampadaJack Kerouac, The low yellowIllustrazione di B. E. Pike tratta da The Wonderland of Science di J. C. Sanford, via nemfrog
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