Posts

September 11, 2014

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5:46 PM | Facebook posts reveal personality traits, but changes complicate interpretation
A study from the University of Kansas finds that people […]
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5:37 PM | Materials by design at the nanoscale: Ceramics don't have to be brittle
Researchers have developed a method for constructing new structural materials by taking advantage of the unusual properties that solids can have at the nanometer scale.
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5:37 PM | Galaxies Writ Small
Courtesy imgur user ScienceLlamaAt a glance, it’s easy to tell that something’s not right with the galaxies and clusters in these images from deep space, but it might sound silly when it’s put into words: they’re little! The photographic technique of miniature faking takes advantage of the way light is focused by a lens to trick your brain into perceiving something that’s thousands of light-years across as being small enough to fit into the palm of your […]
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5:29 PM | The sound of an atom has been captured
Scientists show the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light.
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5:20 PM | New species of electrons in graphene can lead to better computing
Electrons in graphene superlattices are different and behave as neutrinos that acquired a notable mass. This results in a new, relativistic behaviour so that electrons can now skew at large angles to applied fields. The effect is huge.
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3:57 PM | Association between sunshine and suicide examined in study
Lower rates of suicide are associated with more daily sunshine […]
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3:53 PM | Last decade’s slow-down in global warming enhanced by an unusual climate anomaly
A hiatus in global warming ongoing since 2001 is due […]
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3:51 PM | Some male scientists willing to forsake careers for family
One third of men in academic science are willing to […]
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3:49 PM | Is The Pattern Of Brain Folding A ‘Fingerprint’ For Schizophrenia?
Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human […]
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1:40 PM | Podcast: The History of the Helium Crisis
In the 1990's, the US Bureau of Land Management unintentionally became the worlds largest supplier of helium. Last year, the world faced a potential helium cliff, when the US government had to decide whether to keep selling helium or exit the market as they'd originally planned. Thankfully, the crisis was averted; this last July the US started auctioning off large chunks of its helium to other suppliers, in an effort to keep the helium market healthy. Today on the Phyiscs Central […]
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1:39 PM | Nanotechnology start-up develops a first-of-its-kind multifunction water filtration membrane
This new membrane lasts twice as long when compared to conventional membranes, is highly resistant to breakage, and has anti-bacterial and anti-biofouling properties. Another groundbreaking characteristic - it allows for an unprecedented flow rate of at least ten times faster than current water filtration membranes.
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1:29 PM | Il destino dell’Universo è davvero legato al bosone di Higgs?
La risposta è: no! Il bosone di Higgs non è ‘pericoloso’ e non distruggerà l’Universo. Per fare meglio il punto su quanto riportato dai vari media in questi giorni, cominciamo con il dire che il bosone di Higgs è un tipo di particella, una minuscola fluttuazione di un campo scalare complesso detto campo di Higgs. […]
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1:04 PM | Hallucinogen in ‘magic mushrooms’ helps longtime smokers quit
Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime […]
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1:03 PM | Multi channel detector continuity tests
The multi channel detector (MCD) assembly found on Physical Electronics 5500 through 5800 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) systems comprises two pieces – the channel plate assembly and the connection flange. If you follow the procedure in the 10-360 spherical capacitive … Continue reading → The post Multi channel detector continuity tests appeared first on RBD TechSpot.
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12:58 PM | Will the real unemployment rate please stand up?
America’s unemployment rate — most recently reported as 6.1 percent […]
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12:56 PM | NASA sees a significant flare surge off the sun
The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 1:48 […]
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12:21 PM | Perfect focus through thick layers may bring better vision to medicine
In a first-of-its-kind demonstration, a team of researchers has developed a powerful technique to focus laser light through even the murkiest of surroundings without the need for a guide star. This innovation, a specialized version of an adaptive optics microscope, can resolve a point less than one thousandth of a millimeter across.
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12:13 PM | Researchers create world's largest DNA origami
Researchers have created the world's largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics.
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11:28 AM | Nanoscience and the environment
Nanomaterials in the Environment covers all aspects of manufactured nanomaterials and their impact and behavior in the environment.
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11:16 AM | New discovery holds promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications
A team of Berkeley Lab researchers believes it has uncovered the secret behind the unusual optoelectronic properties of single atomic layers of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials, the two-dimensional semiconductors that hold great promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications.
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10:01 AM | U Manchester to build a $100m Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre
Funding provided by the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund, the Technology Strategy Board and Masdar, an Abu Dhabi-based clean technology and renewable energy company University of Manchester and Masdar Institute to establish graphene commercial application programs.
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9:54 AM | Nanofiber eye drops to treat molecular basis of the blindness
Scientists have discovered a novel cause of glaucoma in an animal model, and related to their findings, are now developing an eye drop aimed at curing the disease. They believe their findings will be important to human glaucoma.
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9:48 AM | Graphene paints a corrosion-free future
The surface of graphene, a one atom thick sheet of carbon, can be randomly decorated with oxygen to create graphene oxide; a form of graphene that could have a significant impact on the chemical, pharmaceutical and electronic industries. Applied as paint, it could provide an ultra-strong, non-corrosive coating for a wide range of industrial applications.
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8:00 AM | Danger, Will Robinson! Links Ahead!
WARNING: wild extrapolation (a classification system for science news) [H]ere’s a potential classification system for science writing. It’s a bit more complex admittedly, and unlike films, multiple classifications can be applied to a single piece. How like science, to be so uncertain.
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6:38 AM | Taking back the angels' share of atoms
Non-uniform evaporation prevents scientists from seeing every atom on a surface.
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5:00 AM | Scoperta una magnetar ‘vicino’ ad una supernova
Le stelle più massicce terminano il loro ciclo vitale con una esplosione che rilascia una enorme quantità di materia ed energia. Ciò che rimane della stella originaria è un oggetto estremamente denso e collassato: stiamo parlando di una stella di neutroni o, nel caso ancora più estremo, di un buco nero. Le stelle di neutroni hanno “sapori” […]
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12:19 AM | There’s no such thing as a Supercluster
The largest structures in the Universe are phantasms, in the process of self-destructing.Continue reading on Medium »

September 10, 2014

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8:43 PM | Quasistrict Symmetric Monoidal 2-Categories via Wire Diagrams
Guest post by Bruce Bartlett I recently put an article on the arXiv: Bruce Bartlett, Quasistrict symmetric monoidal 2-categories via wire diagrams. It's about Chris Schommer-Pries's recent strictification result from his updated thesis, that every symmetric monoidal bicategory is...
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6:32 PM | Defying physics, engineers prove a magnetic field for light
The researchers demonstrated the existence of this field with an experimental interferometer, a micron-scale device with two modulators that send light waves back and forth between them.
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5:37 PM | Cosmological Attractors
I want to tell you about a paper I recently wrote with grad student Grant Remmen, about how much inflation we should expect to have occurred in the early universe. But that paper leans heavily on an earlier one that … Continue reading →
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