Posts

February 25, 2015

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7:50 PM | Nanomanufactured Block 'M' illustrates big ideas in drug delivery
By making what might be the world's smallest three-dimensional unofficial Block 'M', University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated a nanoparticle manufacturing process capable of producing multilayered, precise shapes.
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5:23 PM | Warming up the world of superconductors
A superconductor that works at room temperature was long thought impossible, but scientists may have discovered a family of materials that could make it reality.
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3:22 PM | Silicon micro-funnels increase the efficiency of solar cells
A biological structure in mammalian eyes has inspired scientists to design an inorganic counterpart for use in solar cells: micron-sized vertical funnels were etched shoulder-to-shoulder in a silicon substrate. Using mathematical models and experiments, they tested how these kind of funnel arrays collect incident light and conduct it to the active layer of a silicon solar cell. Their result: this arrangement of funnels increases photo absorption by about 65 percent in a thin-film solar cell.
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3:00 PM | A light on the horizon: New antibiotic without detectable resistance discovered in uncultured bacteria
There is a widespread concern about the increasing antibiotic resistance and the limited new drugs to treat infectious diseases, as discussed in a previous […] Read more The post A light on the horizon: New antibiotic without detectable resistance discovered in uncultured bacteria appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:A mediator for horizontal gene transfer between eukaryotes and prokaryotes Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy: another smart solution for an old […]
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2:55 PM | In quest for better lithium-air batteries, nanoparticle coatings improve carbon's stability
Researchers unveiled a new method of stabilizing carbon - a central structural component of any battery - that could pave the way to new performance standards in the hunt for a lithium-ion components.
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2:55 PM | The neuroscience of how you enter your fantasy-realms
If you grew up reading Harry Potter (or Lord of the Rings, as the case may be), chances are you’d have liked to move to the world of Hogwarts (or Middle Earth), and spent time play-acting scenes in your head as if you were in them. This way of enjoying fiction isn’t uncommon. On the […]
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2:47 PM | Magnetic nanoparticles enhance performance of solar cells
Magnetic nanoparticles can increase the performance of solar cells made from polymers - provided the mix is right.
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2:34 PM | Growing Black Holes: Hunting for the First Seeds
Mar Mezcua We are pleased to welcome Mar Mezcua as a guest blogger today. She led the study that is the subject of our latest press release, about an intermediate mass black hole. Mar is from Balaguer (Lleida, Spain) and studied Physics in the University Autonomous of Barcelona and in the University of La Laguna, where she also specialized in Astrophysics. She completed her PhD at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany) in 2011 and then moved to the Instituto de Astrofisica […]
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2:33 PM | Division of Labor in Science Communication
Paige Brown Jarreau, who blogs at From the Lab Bench is in the throes of writing her dissertation about science blogging, and plowing through a lot of interview data. She’s sharing some of the process on the blog, and a lot more on Twitter, where it’s prompted a good deal of discussion. One of the…
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2:30 PM | NASA's Chandra Finds Intriguing Member of Black Hole Family Tree
A newly discovered object in the galaxy NGC 2276 may prove to be an important black hole that helps fill in the evolutionary story of these exotic objects, as described in our latest press release. The main image in this graphic contains a composite image of NGC 2766 that includes X-rays from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (pink) combined with optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Digitized Sky Survey (red, green and blue). The inset is a zoom into the interesting source that […]
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2:25 PM | Waldo e la strada verso la miniaturizzazione
Waldo E. Jones sembrava fluttuare nell'aria al centro di una stanza sferica. L'impressione derivava dal fatto che fluttuava davvero nell'aria. La sua casa era inserita in un'orbita libera, con un periodo di poco più di ventiquattro ore.(8)Waldo abita nello spazio. In orbita intorno alla Terra. Soffre di una malattia che gli impedisce di muoversi sotto l'azione della gravità terrestre. Questo impedimento, come si suol dire, gli ha aguzzato l'ingegno, permettendogli di diventare […]

Ashley S. (2001). Nanobot Construction Crews, Scientific American, 285 (3) 84-85. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0901-84

Smalley R.E. (2001). Of Chemistry, Love and Nanobots, Scientific American, 285 (3) 76-77. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0901-76

Ge J., Lei J. & Zare R.N. (2012). Protein–inorganic hybrid nanoflowers, Nature Nanotechnology, 7 (7) 428-432. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2012.80

Citation
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1:45 PM | U.S. Defense Dep’t: Come get weird with us
The Defense Department is seeking novel ideas to shape its future, and officials are looking to industry, small business, academia, start-ups, the public –- anyone, really –- to boost its […]
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1:43 PM | Scientists trap electron twisters to keep supercurrents flowing at top speed
Superconductor materials are prized for their ability to carry an electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled or lost when electrons swirl into tiny tornado-like formations […]
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1:42 PM | Humans, sea anemone share nerve signal origins
New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a […]
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1:40 PM | Study identifies children at risk for persistent mathematics difficulties
A recent study published in the Journal of Learning Disabilities suggests early screening and intervention may prevent persistent math difficulties (PMD) for at-risk children. The study identifies at-risk children as […]
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1:39 PM | Worldwide, the nitrogen cycle is off
When exposed to nitrogen fertilizer over a period of years, nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia evolve to become less beneficial to legumes – the plants they normally serve. These findings, reported […]
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1:37 PM | Workplace negativity can hurt productivity
Employees who point out problems in the office may help the company improve, but could be hurting themselves in the process. Such negative-minded workers are more likely to become mentally […]
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1:15 PM | How can we fight online shaming campaigns?
Longtime friend and colleague Boaz Barak sent me a fascinating New York Times Magazine article that profiles people who lost their jobs or otherwise had their lives ruined, because of a single remark that then got amplified a trillionfold in importance by social media.  (The author, Jon Ronson, also has a forthcoming book on the topic.)  The article opens with Justine […]
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12:46 PM | Flexible nanosensors for wearable devices
A new method will enable the fabrication of optical nanosensors capable of sticking on uneven surfaces and biological surfaces like human skin. This result can boost the use of wearable devices to monitor parameters such as temperature, breath and heart pressure.
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12:30 PM | Speculative Futures #11...
Topics: Diaspora, Space Exploration, Speculative FictionConception, Volume Two of the Darkside Trilogyby William HayashiConception, Volume Two of the Darkside Trilogy tells the story of the extraordinary people who built their lunar secret habitat (chronicled in Discovery: Volume 1 of the Darkside Trilogy) and how they came together. These people, exclusively Black, conceive of, design and construct technological marvels that the collective scientific minds of the entire world cannot duplicate. […]
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12:00 PM | Warp Drives and Wormholes...
Topics: FTL, Space Exploration, Spacetime, Star Trek, WormholesSince the 1994 paper by Miguel Alcubierre (and the physics caveats to attaining it), there has been some interest in this area just because of the vastness of interstellar space and the limitations since the Mercury Space Program of Newtonian Space Travel.Also, it is unlikely we will come in contact with 5-dimensional hyper-humans that want to see to their ancestors' survival by popping up a wormhole next to Saturn (note: not a […]
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9:51 AM | On route to self-powered smart suits
Such energy-scavenging fabrics based on nano-sized generators that have piezoelectric properties could eventually lead to wearable 'smart' clothes that can power integrated electronics and sensors through ordinary body movements. Researchers have now demonstrated a new type of fully flexible, very robust and wearable triboelectric nanogenerator with high power-generating performance and mechanical robustness. This was achieved by applying a bottom-up nanostructuring approach where a […]
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8:15 AM | nANO meets water VI: Nanotechnik für die Wasser-Praxis
Am 19. Februar 2015 hiess es wieder 'nANO meets water' bei Fraunhofer UMSICHT. Gut 100 Fachleute aus Industrie und Wirtschaft kamen nach Oberhausen, um sich beim Thema Innovationen und Risiken von Nanomaterialien für die Wassertechnik auf den neuesten Stand zu bringen.
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8:14 AM | Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy
Scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells.
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8:01 AM | New nanowire structure absorbs light efficiently
Dual-type nanowire arrays can be used in applications such as LEDs and solar cells.
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5:00 AM | Retracing the Roots of Fungal Symbioses
Scientists at the Joint Genome Institute provide more insight into how plants and fungi develop symbiotic relationships.
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4:49 AM | A conference’s peer-review was found to be sort of random, but whose fault is it?
It’s not a good time for peer-review. Sure, if you’ve been a regular reader of Retraction Watch, it’s never been a good time for peer-review. But aside from that, the process has increasingly been taking the brunt for not being able to stem the publishing of results that – after publication – have been found […]
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4:00 AM | LHC, sale la febbre per il Run 2
A qualche settimana dall’inizio delle attività, la comunità scientifica è in trepidante attesa per i nuovi esperimenti del Large Hadron Collider (LHC) che potrebbero cambiare la nostra comprensione dell’Universo. Fisici ed ingegneri stanno effettuando gli ultimi controlli dopo due anni di manutenzione che hanno portato il grande collisore a raddoppiare l’energia di collisione. Tra gli … Continue reading LHC, sale la febbre per il Run 2 →
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1:20 AM | Concepts of Sameness (Part 3)
What good is the equation x = x?

February 24, 2015

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11:06 PM | Islamic science paved the way for a millennial celebration of light
Ibn al-Haytham’s book on optics from a millennium ago serves as a good excuse to celebrate the International Year of Light.
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