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Posts

April 10, 2014

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5:50 PM | Supernova Cleans Up its Surroundings
Supernovas are the spectacular ends to the lives of many massive stars. These explosions, which occur on average twice a century in the Milky Way, can produce enormous amounts of energy and be as bright as an entire galaxy. These events are also important because the remains of the shattered star are hurled into space. As this debris field - called a supernova remnant - expands, it carries the material it encounters along with it. Astronomers have identified a supernova remnant that has […]
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5:23 PM | Plastic Logic shows a flexible OLED display for wearable devices
Plastic Logic demonstrated a flexible AMOLED display at Printed Electronics Europe. The flexible device is the direct result of a recently announced collaboration with Novaled, a supplier of OLED materials.
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5:19 PM | 'NanoDay in Buffalo' introduces 450 students to opportunities in nanotechnology
The students obtained an up-close look at the 21st Century science that is driving technological progress by taking part in a number of engaging presentations, nano-enabled demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Students also learned about the cutting-edge initiatives that are leading to a growing number of nanotechnology-based careers.
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5:00 PM | Robert Redford film foretold Shor’s quantum computing bombshell
Twenty years ago, Peter Shor showed how quantum computers could break secret codes, turning the movie Sneakers from fiction to fact.
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4:28 PM | Study: Gutting of campaign finance laws enhances influence of corporations, rich
Affluent individuals and business corporations already have vastly more influence […]
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4:15 PM | Robert Redford film foretold Shor’s quantum computing bombshell
ContextQuantum Physics,History of Science by Tom Siegfried 1:00pm, April 10, 2014 The star-studded 1992 thriller Sneakers foretold a world in which a computer could decode all the computerized classified data in the world. Two years after the movie came out, mathematician Peter Shor figured out the math that makes cryptography vulnerable to quantum computers.© United Archives […]
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4:03 PM | Thermoelectric generator on glass fabric for wearable electronic devices
Researchers have developed a glass fabric-based thermoelectric generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm.
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3:58 PM | Invitation to the 10th International Conference On Physics Of Advanced Materials
This event is intended to be a forum of physicists, chemists, material scientists, physicians, engineers and artists for discussion and exchange of ideas and results, both in fundamental and applied research of advanced materials and will consist of invited and contributed papers during plenary, oral and poster sessions.
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3:55 PM | Emerging research suggests a new paradigm for 'unconventional superconductors'
An international team of scientists has reported the first experimental observation of the quantum critical point (QCP) in the extensively studied 'unconventional superconductor' TiSe2, finding that it does not reside as predicted within the superconducting dome of the phase diagram, but rather at a full GPa higher in pressure.
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3:47 PM | Art and Science International Photo Contest
This contest addresses to all amateur/professional photographers and scientists. Any science related image is eligible for competition.
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3:45 PM | Flex Your Vector Skills in the New Game Sector Vector
Some unexpected things are happening at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, MA. First-year engineering students are spending nearly three times longer in the classroom and senior industrial design students are taking an interest in physics.Game logo. Complements of James O'Brien, Greg Sirokman and Derek Casio.This due to the ingenuity of WIT faculty members James O’Brien, assistant professor physics, Greg Sirokman, assistant professor of chemistry, and Derek Casio, assistant […]
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3:24 PM | Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles
Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. It occurs in gemstones and snowflakes and even in biology, an area typically associated with complexity and diversity. There are striking examples: the shapes of virus particles, such as those causing the common cold, are highly symmetrical and look like tiny footballs.
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3:19 PM | Sunlight generates hydrogen in new porous silicon
Porous silicon manufactured in a bottom up procedure using solar energy can be used to generate hydrogen from water, according to a team of Penn State mechanical engineers, who also see applications for batteries, biosensors and optical electronics as outlets for this new material.
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2:39 PM | David Hestenes of Geometric Algebra Fame to speak at Texas A&M Today
Dr. David Hestenes, (pictured to the left [2]), the original author of geometric algebra, (it was his PhD dissertation work at UCLA), will be speaking at A&M today[1].We learning how to do literature review matrices in our writing class, so I thought I'd try out the technique while reading Dr. Hestene's bio[2] last night.  Here are the key points I came away with1.  Hestenes was inspired by Marcel Riesz's book "Clifford Numbers and Spinors"[3]One day in the mathematics– […]
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2:00 PM | As gene therapy technologies blossom, ddRNAi tries to take root
Before there was Twitter, there was Facebook, and before that, Friendster. And who can forget MySpace? There’s a similar trend of successive usurping technologies in the fast-moving quest to develop therapeutics capable of modifying the genome. Since the late nineties, we’ve witnessed the rise of several gene-silencing approaches, from “antisense” oligonucleotides and RNA interference (RNAi) to the latest targeted genome-editing techniques, such as those based on zinc […]
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1:51 PM | China looks to science and technology to fuel its economy
Maintaining stability in the face of rapid change and growth, […]
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1:48 PM | Existing technique could accelerate metabolism to fight obesity
Researchers identify a protein in fat and liver cells that […]
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1:46 PM | Forget the honeybadger: Tough marsupial may have hunted prey bigger than itself
The reconstruction of an extinct meat-eating marsupial’s skull, Nimbacinus dicksoni, […]
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1:44 PM | Head injuries can make children loners
Study also suggests potential treatment New research has found that […]
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1:42 PM | HIV battle must focus on hard-hit streets
In U.S. cities, it’s not just what you do, but […]
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1:36 PM | Malaysia flight search costs U.S. military $7 million so far
The Defense Department has committed more than $7 million over […]
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1:31 PM | Drug a dud for diastolic heart failure
A drug that blocks the action of a key hormone […]
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1:30 PM | USDA Researchers Go High-Tech to View Tiny Organisms
“Seeing the unseen” may sound like a science fiction movie […]
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1:28 PM | Into the abyss: Scientists explore one of Earth’s deepest ocean trenches
“Telepresence” capability will bring mysteries of The Deep to the […]
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1:17 PM | Mars scientist: Crater once held a lake after all
If desert mirages occur on Mars, “Lake Gusev” belongs among […]
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1:15 PM | Entrepreneurship with Steve Blank
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re exploring entrepreneurship: how to brush up on your business skills, where to get venture capital funding and more. In this podcast, I speak to Steve Blank, an associate professor at Stanford University engineering school, a lecturer at UC Berkeley Haas Business School, Columbia Business School and the University of California in San Fransisco (UCSF). On top of all of that, he is also a thought leader of […]
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12:58 PM | Toward new tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scale
Scientists propose a scheme to probe non-classical states of macroscopic systems.
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12:55 PM | LHC begins to restart
Il gruppo di scienziati che lavorano presso LHC hanno ripreso il processo di riavvio del complesso acceleratore di particelle anche se sarà operativo non prima del 2015. L’acceleratore sarà riavviato […]
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12:30 PM | Standing on the shoulders of SBG greatness
I've done a lot of reading on the implementation of standards-based grading (SBG) in physics classes. I often tell people I meet that most of the SBG classrooms I know of are in the high schools. I can point to Frank Noschese, Kelly O'Shea, Geoff Schmit, and Shawn Cornally as SBG experts who have successfully used SBG in their classes and share resources online.Looking online for resources for doing this at the college level has often seemed to turn up fewer resources, at least in my opinion. […]
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12:23 PM | Surface-modified nanocellulose hydrogels for wound dressing
Nanocellulose from wood is a promising nanomaterial with potential applications as a substrate for printing electronics, filtration, or biomedicine. Researchers have now reported on a method to control the surface chemistry of nanocellulose. They fabricated nanocellulose gels that have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment. This material could be of great interest for critical wound healing applications.
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