Posts

October 22, 2014

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1:09 PM | A Star Wars laser bullet - this is what it really looks like
Tests of a new compact high-power laser have given researchers the opportunity to film the passage of an ultrashort laser pulse through the air. The film shows the journey of a light projectile at an extremely slow rate, similar to that watched on cinema screens by science-fiction aficionados.
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1:00 PM | Skin patch could replace the syringe for disease diagnosis
Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe.
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12:55 PM | Cooling to almost absolute zerowith molecules
An international team of scientists have become the first ever researchers to successfully reach temperatures below minus 272.15 degrees Celsius - only just above absolute zero - using magnetic molecules.
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12:50 PM | Nanoparticle technology triples the production of biogas
Researchers have developed the new BiogasPlus, a technology which allows increasing the production of biogas by 200% with a controlled introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles to the process of organic waste treatment.
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12:43 PM | The Death Star moon has a weird interior
Saturn’s small moon Mimas is best known for the giant crater Herschel, which makes it look like the Death Star. However, a new study based on Cassini data shows that its interior is weird too. While Mimas presents the same face to Saturn due to tidal-locking (just like the Moon does with Earth), it rocks […]
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12:40 PM | A new imaging approach for monitoring cell metabolism
Scientists have used a new imaging technique to monitor how glucose, our main energy source, is used in the body. Their findings may have great implications for diseases like diabetes.
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12:34 PM | Sopping up proteins with thermosponge nanoparticle platform
Researchers develop novel nanoparticle platform that proves effective in delivering protein-based drugs.
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11:33 AM | Whole exome sequencing closer to becoming ‘new family history’
Approximately one-fourth of the 3,386 patients whose DNA was submitted […]
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11:19 AM | Kung fu stegosaur killed with its spiky tail
Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they […]
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11:17 AM | Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions
Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, […]
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11:16 AM | Troubled marriage, depression history promote obesity
Hostile interactions, chronic mood problems alter how body processes high-fat […]
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11:15 AM | Webb’s heart survives deep freeze test
After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures […]
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11:11 AM | Chemists show that ALS is a protein aggregation disease
Using a technique that illuminates subtle changes in individual proteins, […]
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11:08 AM | New 3D printing algorithms speed production, reduce waste
New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the […]
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11:06 AM | Animal Therapy Reduces Anxiety, Loneliness Symptoms in College Students
Animal-assisted therapy can reduce symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among […]
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11:04 AM | Email For inmates, pricey hepatitis C drug could make financial sense
New, significantly improved hepatitis C drugs have revolutionized how the […]
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11:03 AM | Competition keeps health-care costs low
Physician practices in areas with low competition charge more for […]
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11:00 AM | Table-Top Gravity Wave Detector
Gravitational waves travel through space and time much like ripples on the surface of water. (Courtesy: iStock/mic27)I've used "table-top" for several postings before. I think science needs to come up with a less-cliche descriptor.A coin-sized detector might observe gravitational waves before the giant LIGO interferometers, according to two Australian physicists who have built the device. The detector is designed to register very high frequency gravitational waves via the exceptionally weak […]
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10:58 AM | Fragments of graphene can speed up the rate of chemical reactions
The new findings suggest that graphene might have potential applications in catalysing chemical reactions of industrial importance.
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10:18 AM | Beneq and DSM Partner to Introduce a Novel Aerosol Deposition Technology For Solar Applications
The two companies are working together developing and commercializing a completely new and superior aerosol deposition technology for AR coatings for solar glass applications.
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8:12 AM | Miniature two-color barcodes have the potential to combat forgery and track cancerous cells
Tiny rod-like single crystals that act as miniature dual-color barcodes have been synthesized by researchers who then demonstrated the potential of these barcodes for two very different applications: anti-counterfeiting measures and cell tracking.
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8:07 AM | Quantum effects bridge the gap between eletronics and plasmonics
Quantum effects in nanometer-scale metallic structures provide a platform for combining molecular electronics and plasmonics.
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4:00 AM | Simulare la radiazione di Hawking con un buco nero ‘artificiale’
Circa 40 anni fa, Stephen Hawking sbalordì i cosmologi quando annunciò che i buchi neri non sono completamente neri, dato che una piccola quantità di radiazione, detta radiazione di Hawking, sarebbe stata in grado di sfuggire all’intensa attrazione gravitazionale. Nel corso del tempo, questa conseguenza emersa nel tentativo di riconciliare la meccanica quantistica e la relatività generale […]
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4:00 AM | Brookhaven Lab Launches Computational Science Initiative
Leveraging computational science expertise and investments across the laboratory to tackle "big data" challenges.
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4:00 AM | Scientists Use Plasma Shaping to Control Turbulence in Stellarators
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics in Germany have devised a new method for minimizing turbulence in bumpy donut-shaped experimental fusion facilities called stellarators.
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2:23 AM | Robot racing
The Engineering Design Show is currently in full swing here, with the competitions for the various design projects. The white-line followers kicked off proceedings. They were pretty impressive, with all but one team successfully being able to follow the (very squiggly) line without mistakes. There were traps to confuse the robots - the line got thinner and thicker, crossed over itself, had abrupt corners and so on, but the robots were well programmed and coped with this easily. The winning […]

October 21, 2014

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8:21 PM | Special microscope captures defects in nanotubes
Chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices.
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8:17 PM | Nanoscale gas chromatography tool detects vapors in environment or a person's breath
A three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant has been awarded to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention.
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4:41 PM | 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Anthropic Principle
And what it might — and might not — give us useful insights into.Continue reading on Medium »
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4:37 PM | Could I squeeze by you?
Scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles.
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