Posts

February 26, 2015

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11:54 PM | Thinking of God makes people bigger risk-takers
Reminders of God can make people more likely to seek out and take risks, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The […]
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11:52 PM | New insight found in black hole collisions
New research by an astrophysicist at The University of Texas at Dallas provides revelations about the most energetic event in the universe — the merging of two spinning, orbiting black […]
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11:51 PM | How humans can develop immunity to deadly Marburg virus
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University and The Scripps Research Institute have identified mechanisms involved in antibody response to the deadly Marburg […]
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10:47 PM | Monade 116
Nel futuro la società umana sarà suddivisa in due macro civiltà: quella delle monadi urbane, agglomerati di palazzoni gigantestchi, chiamati costellazioni al cui interno ad ogni piano, vengono stipati quantità di esseri umani da fare invidia a metropoli come New York; e quella delle campagne, dove quelli che oggi definiremmo contadini vivono coltivando la terra e preservando l'ambiente. Le due civiltà hanno pochissimi scambi, se non quelli strettamente […]
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7:47 PM | The First Colorblind, Ultrathin Lens Is Developed
A new kind of flat, ultrathin lens has been created by Harvard physicists that can focus multiple colors of light in the same spot.Traditional lenses and other optical devices focus different colors in different places, requiring multiple lenses to create a sharp, multicolor image. By developing one flat "colorblind" lens that can focus many colors in the same way, the researchers hope their device can be used in fields where miniature, low-cost lenses are key, such as photography, optical […]
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5:00 PM | Space Scoop: Megaflares Shed Light On Our Black Hole
Supermassive black holes are famous for their ability to swallow anything - even light.
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4:45 PM | A new X-ray microscope for nanoscale imaging
Delivering the capability to image nanostructures and chemical reactions down to nanometer resolution requires a new class of x-ray microscope that can perform precision microscopy experiments using ultra-bright x-rays from the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.
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4:37 PM | New research predicts when, how materials will act
A material might melt or snap in half. And for engineers, knowing when and why that might happen is crucial information. Now, a researcher has laid out an overarching theory that explains why certain materials act the way they do.
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3:41 PM | Precision gas sensor could fit on a chip
Using their expertise in silicon optics, Cornell engineers have miniaturized a light source in the elusive mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectrum, effectively squeezing the capabilities of a large, tabletop laser onto a 1-millimeter silicon chip.
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3:34 PM | The building blocks of the future defy logic
A new logic-defying mathematical model could lead to materials for better skin grafts and new smart materials.
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3:03 PM | Many Worlds Are Never Exhausted
There have been some good comments on last week’s post about the Many-Worlds Interpretation, which I find a little surprising, as it was thrown together very quickly and kind of rant-y on my part, because I was annoyed by the tone of the original Phillip Ball article. (His follow-up hasn’t helped that…) But then maybe…
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2:43 PM | Throwback Thursday: Earth’s second moon?
Another world orbits the Sun once a year at the same distance as our planet.Continue reading on Medium »
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2:40 PM | Cambrios and Heraeus Jointly Create New, High-Conductivity Transparent Nanowire Conductors
Two companies' combined products dramatically extend flexible substrate capabilities for next-generation mass-market technology products.
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2:19 PM | Bioactive nanoengineered hydrogels for bone tissue engineering
Researchers have developed an injectable osteoinductive collagen-based nanosilicate matrix for growth-factor-free bone tissue engineering.
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2:12 PM | Read the Whole Thing
Jon “Men Who Stare at Goats” Ronson has a new book coming out, and has been promoting it with excerpts in major newspapers, most notably the New York Times Magazine and the Guardian. In these, he tracks down people whose lives were wrecked by massive public shaming campaigns over idiotic things they wrote on social…
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2:11 PM | Young problem drinkers consume less if they take naltrexone
Young people who drink abusively consume less and suffer fewer consequences from alcohol if they take naltrexone, a Yale School of Medicine study shows. While the drug the did not […]
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2:10 PM | Antifreeze protein from ticks fights frostbite in mice
A protein that protects ticks from freezing temperatures also prevents frostbite when introduced in mice, a Yale-led study has found. The research is the first to demonstrate the protein’s ability […]
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2:09 PM | A new understanding of Alzheimer’s
Although natural selection is often thought of as a force that determines the adaptation of replicating organisms to their environment, Harvard researchers have found that selection also occurs at the […]
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2:07 PM | Electronic alerts may do more harm than good for kidney patients
The use of electronic alerts by hospitals treating patients with acute kidney injury may increase interventions without improving care, a study by Yale researchers found. The study was published Feb. […]
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2:06 PM | Mollusk shell optics may help develop responsive, transparent displays.
The blue-rayed limpet is a tiny mollusk that lives in kelp beds along the coasts of Norway, Iceland, the United Kingdom, Portugal, and the Canary Islands. These diminutive organisms — […]
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1:41 PM | Young Nanoscientist India Award 2015 announces winner
The Nanotechnology Forum for Indian Scientists (NT Forum) announces that Dr Arindam Ghosh from IISC, Bangalore is the first winner of the 'Oxford Instruments Young Nanoscientist Award 2015'.
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1:35 PM | Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays (w/video)
New findings represent the first evidence of an organism using mineralized structural components to produce optical displays. While birds, butterflies, and beetles can display brilliant blues, among other colors, they do so with organic structures, such as feathers, scales, and plates. The limpet, by contrast, produces its blue stripes through an interplay of inorganic, mineral structures, arranged in such a way as to reflect only blue light.
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11:40 AM | Neo Négritude...
Hughes and Damas#1953511Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library.The writers of the Harlem Renaissance, such as Langston Hughes and Claude McKay, who lived in France in order to escape American racism and segregation, influenced the founders of the Négritude movement. Many years later, Léon-Gontran Damas, cofounder of Négritude, and Langston Hughes share a moment.Image 1 of 17Topics: African Heritage, Civil […]
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11:39 AM | DSR and Gravity's Rainbow...
Dr. Stephen Hawking of Cambridge University alongside illustrations of a black hole and an event horizon with Hawking Radiation. He continues to engage his grey matter to uncover the secrets of the Universe while others attempt to confirm his existing theories. Credit: Photo: BBC, Illus.: T.ReyesTopics: Big Bang, Black Holes, Einstein, DSR, Gravity, Spacetime, Special RelativityWe've come a long way in 13.8 billion years; but despite our impressively extensive understanding of the Universe, […]
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9:36 AM | 2D-NANOLATTICES nanoelectronics project makes important step with silicene
A European research project has made an important step towards the further miniaturisation of nanoelectronics, using a highly-promising new material called silicene. Its goal: to make devices of the future vastly more powerful and energy efficient.
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8:21 AM | Moving molecules write letters
Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics.
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8:11 AM | Park Systems Joins Forces with imec to Develop Advancements in Nanoscale AFM Metrology Solutions for Semiconductor Manufacturing
Park Systems announced today they have signed a Joint Development Project with nanoelectronics research center imec, to develop in-line AFM metrology solutions of future technology nodes including but not limited to surface roughness, thickness, critical dimension, and sidewall roughness.
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6:15 AM | Introduction to Synthetic Mathematics (part 1)
A draft of an introduction to synthetic mathematics
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5:38 AM | That old camera in the back of the closet … and other science stories
Old cameras fascinate me. I still have my father’s old Argus C3, my mother’s Kodak Brownie Starmeter, and a couple of vintage Instamatics, among others. Somehow I acquired an Argus 75 box camera and a busted Falcon Miniature — there’s a hole in the latter’s body where the shutter button used to be, so that […]
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5:00 AM | A New X-Ray Microscope for Nanoscale Imaging
This groundbreaking instrument at Brookhaven National Lab, designed to deliver a suite of unprecedented x-ray imaging capabilities for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline, brings researchers one step closer to the ultimate goal of nanometer resolution at NSLS-II, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility.
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