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Posts

April 10, 2014

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3:47 PM | Art and Science International Photo Contest
This contest addresses to all amateur/professional photographers and scientists. Any science related image is eligible for competition.
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3:45 PM | Flex Your Vector Skills in the New Game Sector Vector
Some unexpected things are happening at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, MA. First-year engineering students are spending nearly three times longer in the classroom and senior industrial design students are taking an interest in physics.Game logo. Complements of James O'Brien, Greg Sirokman and Derek Casio.This due to the ingenuity of WIT faculty members James O’Brien, assistant professor physics, Greg Sirokman, assistant professor of chemistry, and Derek Casio, assistant […]
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3:24 PM | Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles
Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. It occurs in gemstones and snowflakes and even in biology, an area typically associated with complexity and diversity. There are striking examples: the shapes of virus particles, such as those causing the common cold, are highly symmetrical and look like tiny footballs.
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3:19 PM | Sunlight generates hydrogen in new porous silicon
Porous silicon manufactured in a bottom up procedure using solar energy can be used to generate hydrogen from water, according to a team of Penn State mechanical engineers, who also see applications for batteries, biosensors and optical electronics as outlets for this new material.
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2:39 PM | David Hestenes of Geometric Algebra Fame to speak at Texas A&M Today
Dr. David Hestenes, (pictured to the left [2]), the original author of geometric algebra, (it was his PhD dissertation work at UCLA), will be speaking at A&M today[1].We learning how to do literature review matrices in our writing class, so I thought I'd try out the technique while reading Dr. Hestene's bio[2] last night.  Here are the key points I came away with1.  Hestenes was inspired by Marcel Riesz's book "Clifford Numbers and Spinors"[3]One day in the mathematics– […]
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2:00 PM | As gene therapy technologies blossom, ddRNAi tries to take root
Before there was Twitter, there was Facebook, and before that, Friendster. And who can forget MySpace? There’s a similar trend of successive usurping technologies in the fast-moving quest to develop therapeutics capable of modifying the genome. Since the late nineties, we’ve witnessed the rise of several gene-silencing approaches, from “antisense” oligonucleotides and RNA interference (RNAi) to the latest targeted genome-editing techniques, such as those based on zinc […]
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1:51 PM | China looks to science and technology to fuel its economy
Maintaining stability in the face of rapid change and growth, […]
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1:48 PM | Existing technique could accelerate metabolism to fight obesity
Researchers identify a protein in fat and liver cells that […]
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1:46 PM | Forget the honeybadger: Tough marsupial may have hunted prey bigger than itself
The reconstruction of an extinct meat-eating marsupial’s skull, Nimbacinus dicksoni, […]
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1:44 PM | Head injuries can make children loners
Study also suggests potential treatment New research has found that […]
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1:42 PM | HIV battle must focus on hard-hit streets
In U.S. cities, it’s not just what you do, but […]
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1:36 PM | Malaysia flight search costs U.S. military $7 million so far
The Defense Department has committed more than $7 million over […]
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1:31 PM | Drug a dud for diastolic heart failure
A drug that blocks the action of a key hormone […]
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1:30 PM | USDA Researchers Go High-Tech to View Tiny Organisms
“Seeing the unseen” may sound like a science fiction movie […]
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1:28 PM | Into the abyss: Scientists explore one of Earth’s deepest ocean trenches
“Telepresence” capability will bring mysteries of The Deep to the […]
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1:17 PM | Mars scientist: Crater once held a lake after all
If desert mirages occur on Mars, “Lake Gusev” belongs among […]
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1:15 PM | Entrepreneurship with Steve Blank
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re exploring entrepreneurship: how to brush up on your business skills, where to get venture capital funding and more. In this podcast, I speak to Steve Blank, an associate professor at Stanford University engineering school, a lecturer at UC Berkeley Haas Business School, Columbia Business School and the University of California in San Fransisco (UCSF). On top of all of that, he is also a thought leader of […]
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12:58 PM | Toward new tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scale
Scientists propose a scheme to probe non-classical states of macroscopic systems.
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12:55 PM | LHC begins to restart
Il gruppo di scienziati che lavorano presso LHC hanno ripreso il processo di riavvio del complesso acceleratore di particelle anche se sarà operativo non prima del 2015. L’acceleratore sarà riavviato […]
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12:30 PM | Standing on the shoulders of SBG greatness
I've done a lot of reading on the implementation of standards-based grading (SBG) in physics classes. I often tell people I meet that most of the SBG classrooms I know of are in the high schools. I can point to Frank Noschese, Kelly O'Shea, Geoff Schmit, and Shawn Cornally as SBG experts who have successfully used SBG in their classes and share resources online.Looking online for resources for doing this at the college level has often seemed to turn up fewer resources, at least in my opinion. […]
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12:23 PM | Surface-modified nanocellulose hydrogels for wound dressing
Nanocellulose from wood is a promising nanomaterial with potential applications as a substrate for printing electronics, filtration, or biomedicine. Researchers have now reported on a method to control the surface chemistry of nanocellulose. They fabricated nanocellulose gels that have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment. This material could be of great interest for critical wound healing applications.
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11:15 AM | Science at play: NSF funds university research on nanotechnology ethics, education
ASU undergraduates have the opportunity to enroll in a challenging course this fall, designed to re-introduce the act of play as a problem-solving technique. The course is offered as part of the larger project, Cross-disciplinary Education in Social and Ethical Aspects of Nanotechnology, which received nearly $200,000 from the National Science Foundation?s Nano Undergraduate Education program.
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11:09 AM | Creating self-assembling nanoparticle films with a common spray gun
Researchers have developed a simple approach of applying a surface coating of thin, flat nanoplatelets using a common spray gun, such as can be purchased off-the-shelf from an art supply store, to create a surface coating in which nanoplatelets spontaneously self-assemble into 'nano-walls'. The nano-walls act as rigid barriers that prevent oxygen gas from reaching the surface, and are effective at low and high humidity levels.
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8:29 AM | Researchers develop method to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch
Researchers have developed a system with which molecular-scale mechanical stimuli can be exerted on a single cell.
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8:00 AM | Induction in the Hole!
Another video of the Navy’s railgun (I did an analysis of an earlier test a few years back), which is slated to be tested at sea pretty soon.
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6:48 AM | CurTran and Weatherford Sign Long-Term Contract for New LiteWire Nanotechnology
CurTran LLC announced that it has signed its first contract for LiteWire products with Weatherford International Ltd. Per the agreement, Weatherford will use, sell, and distribute LiteWire, the first commercial scale production of a carbon nanotube technology in wire and cable form.

April 09, 2014

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10:42 PM | Podcast: Lucky Planet
This week on the physics central podcast I talk with David Waltham, a geologist at the University of London and the author of Lucky Planet: Why Earth is Exceptional—and What That Means for Life in the Universe. In the book, Waltham presents the evidence supporting the idea that Earth is a very rare, very lucky planet, and that there may not be another life-supporting planet in our galaxy or even in the visible universe. Waltham doesn't think we're totally alone in the […]
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8:06 PM | The motion of the medium matters for self-assembling particles (w/video)
Earlier work assumed that the liquid medium in which certain self-assembling particles float could be treated as a placid vacuum, but a University of Pennsylvania team has shown that fluid dynamics play a crucial role in the kind and quality of the structures that can be made in this way.
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5:55 PM | Acid-bath stem cell scientist apologizes and appeals
Haruko Obokata, the Japanese scientist at the centre of a controversy over studies purporting to turn mature cells to stem cells simply by bathing them in acid or subjecting them to mechanical stress, today apologized for her errors in the work.  Read more
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5:23 PM | Nanocrystals offer a novel way to make ethanol without corn or other plants
Scientists have created a copper-based catalyst that produces large quantities of ethanol from carbon monoxide gas at room temperature.
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