Posts

September 12, 2014

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7:58 AM | Mass producing super-thin films that can 'squeeze' electricity
The EU project PIEZOVOLUME focused on speeding the production of piezoelectric film material. The research team worked to develop high-volume production tools and methods that are expected to help make the high-tech devices and systems of the future faster, lighter and more efficient.
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7:51 AM | Moving silicon atoms in graphene with atomic precision (w/video)
An international collaboration of research teams has shown how an electron beam can move silicon atoms through the graphene lattice without causing damage. The research combines advanced electron microscopy with demanding computer simulations.
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6:30 AM | Liposome research meets nanotechnology to improve cancer treatment
In the race to find more effective ways to treat cancer, Boise State University biophysicist Daniel Fologea is working outside the rules of general mathematics that say one plus one equals two. In his world, one plus one adds up to a whole lot more.
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6:27 AM | Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
New math explains dynamics of fluid systems that mimic many peculiarities of quantum mechanics.
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6:12 AM | Physicists find a new way to push electrons around
Discovery might ultimately lead to new, more energy-efficient transistors and microchips.
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6:06 AM | A solution for tunable dyes
Modifying a common organic dye molecule results in tunable optical characteristics that can be changed by exposure to different chemical reagents and solvents.
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6:02 AM | Magnetism intensified by nanoscale defects
Electron microscopy reveals how certain nanoscale crystal defects can dramatically intensify ferromagnetism in metal alloys.
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5:58 AM | An optical cage for atoms
A microstructured optical fiber trap provides a tool for measuring atomic properties at the quantum limit.

September 11, 2014

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10:57 PM | Why We Explore: A Comet Tale Told in Four Pictures
There are many ways to explain the reasons for space exploration: the technological spin-offs, the science-education value, the commercial potential of space, the pragmatic lessons back home in everything from space-weather forecasting to mineral exploration. I’ve seen plenty of evidence that all these things are true, yet they dance around the most essential and least […]The post Why We Explore: A Comet Tale Told in Four Pictures appeared first on Out There.
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9:56 PM | Throwback Thursday: The Green Flash
The physics of one of the rarest and most spectacular sunset sights ever seen!Continue reading on Medium »
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9:44 PM | Steven Pinker’s inflammatory proposal: universities should prioritize academics
If you haven’t yet, I urge you to read Steven Pinker’s brilliant piece in The New Republic about what’s broken with America’s “elite” colleges and how to fix it.  The piece starts out as an evisceration of an earlier New Republic article on the same subject by William Deresiewicz.  Pinker agrees with Deresiewicz that something is wrong, […]
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9:05 PM | China sets goals for building space station
Given its name, you might imagine that the International Space Station is, well, international.  And, it definitely is; even when political tempers are running hot, the US and Russia lead the way for a variety of nations to learn to live and work in space.  But, there are a few countries that haven't been invited to the party.  These pariahs include developing space nations like North Korea, Iran, and China.  It's a bit unfair, though, to lump China in with those other […]
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6:15 PM | Art and nanotechnology converge in campus biennial
For her newest work, Korean artist Kimsooja wanted to explore a 'shape and perspective that reveals the invisible as visible, physical as immaterial, and vice versa.'
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6:04 PM | Scientists discover neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia
Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers at Skaggs […]
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6:02 PM | New superfoods could help key protein keep bodies healthy
A new generation of new superfoods that tackle heart disease […]
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5:46 PM | Facebook posts reveal personality traits, but changes complicate interpretation
A study from the University of Kansas finds that people […]
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5:37 PM | Materials by design at the nanoscale: Ceramics don't have to be brittle
Researchers have developed a method for constructing new structural materials by taking advantage of the unusual properties that solids can have at the nanometer scale.
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5:37 PM | Galaxies Writ Small
Courtesy imgur user ScienceLlamaAt a glance, it’s easy to tell that something’s not right with the galaxies and clusters in these images from deep space, but it might sound silly when it’s put into words: they’re little! The photographic technique of miniature faking takes advantage of the way light is focused by a lens to trick your brain into perceiving something that’s thousands of light-years across as being small enough to fit into the palm of your […]
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5:29 PM | The sound of an atom has been captured
Scientists show the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light.
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5:20 PM | New species of electrons in graphene can lead to better computing
Electrons in graphene superlattices are different and behave as neutrinos that acquired a notable mass. This results in a new, relativistic behaviour so that electrons can now skew at large angles to applied fields. The effect is huge.
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3:57 PM | Association between sunshine and suicide examined in study
Lower rates of suicide are associated with more daily sunshine […]
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3:53 PM | Last decade’s slow-down in global warming enhanced by an unusual climate anomaly
A hiatus in global warming ongoing since 2001 is due […]
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3:51 PM | Some male scientists willing to forsake careers for family
One third of men in academic science are willing to […]
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3:49 PM | Is The Pattern Of Brain Folding A ‘Fingerprint’ For Schizophrenia?
Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human […]
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1:40 PM | Podcast: The History of the Helium Crisis
In the 1990's, the US Bureau of Land Management unintentionally became the worlds largest supplier of helium. Last year, the world faced a potential helium cliff, when the US government had to decide whether to keep selling helium or exit the market as they'd originally planned. Thankfully, the crisis was averted; this last July the US started auctioning off large chunks of its helium to other suppliers, in an effort to keep the helium market healthy. Today on the Phyiscs Central […]
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1:39 PM | Nanotechnology start-up develops a first-of-its-kind multifunction water filtration membrane
This new membrane lasts twice as long when compared to conventional membranes, is highly resistant to breakage, and has anti-bacterial and anti-biofouling properties. Another groundbreaking characteristic - it allows for an unprecedented flow rate of at least ten times faster than current water filtration membranes.
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1:29 PM | Il destino dell’Universo è davvero legato al bosone di Higgs?
La risposta è: no! Il bosone di Higgs non è ‘pericoloso’ e non distruggerà l’Universo. Per fare meglio il punto su quanto riportato dai vari media in questi giorni, cominciamo con il dire che il bosone di Higgs è un tipo di particella, una minuscola fluttuazione di un campo scalare complesso detto campo di Higgs. […]
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1:04 PM | Hallucinogen in ‘magic mushrooms’ helps longtime smokers quit
Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime […]
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1:03 PM | Multi channel detector continuity tests
The multi channel detector (MCD) assembly found on Physical Electronics 5500 through 5800 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) systems comprises two pieces – the channel plate assembly and the connection flange. If you follow the procedure in the 10-360 spherical capacitive … Continue reading → The post Multi channel detector continuity tests appeared first on RBD TechSpot.
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12:58 PM | Will the real unemployment rate please stand up?
America’s unemployment rate — most recently reported as 6.1 percent […]
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