Posts

November 13, 2014

+
2:47 PM | Reaching New Heights For Women & X-ray Astronomy
PART 1: #womeninstem STS-93 Launch Shortly after midnight on July 23, 1999, the Space Shuttle Columbia blasted off from the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The mission – dubbed STS-93 in NASA shorthand – had several purposes to achieve and scientific experiments to perform. The primary objective of the STS-93 mission was to deploy NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, the largest payload ever to fly aboard a Space Shuttle. Chandra was also the most […]
+
1:05 PM | Hang On, Philae!
Philae Lands On 67P…3 Times?!! Rosetta’s lander, Philae, on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko! One of the lander’s three feet can be seen in the foreground. This image is a two-image mosaic from CIVA. ESA is promising the full panoramic from CIVA will be delivered in a press briefing today at 13.00 GMT/14.00 CET.. Image […]
+
1:02 PM | China’s old-growth forests vanishing
China’s anti-logging, conservation and ecotourism policies are accelerating the loss of old-growth forests in one of the world’s most ecologically fragile places, according to studies led by a Dartmouth College […]
+
1:00 PM | Latest Supercomputers Enable High-Resolution Climate Models, Truer Simulation of Extreme Weather
Berkeley Lab researcher says climate science is entering a new golden age. Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate […]
+
12:57 PM | Fighting crime through crowdsourcing
University of Miami researchers are developing a computing model that uses crowdsourcing to combine and optimize human efforts and machine computing, to perform complex tasks Crowdsourcing utilizes the input of […]
+
12:55 PM | A Piece of the Quantum Puzzle
UCSB physicists demonstrate the high level of controllability needed to explore ideas in quantum simulations While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral […]
+
12:49 PM | New way to move atomically thin semiconductors for use in flexible devices (w/video)
Researchers have developed a new way to transfer thin semiconductor films, which are only one atom thick, onto arbitrary substrates, paving the way for flexible computing or photonic devices.
+
12:36 PM | Just a theory? | Life & Physics
Plate techtonics, general relativity, alien abductions, evolution, magic water, the big bang, quantum mechanics... all just theories. But not in the same way. A lovely short film explains whyHeres wonderful short film from the Royal Institution, in which I think Jim Al-Khalili is channelling the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxys calmer and more rational upgrade. Continue reading...
+
12:00 PM | K5...
The K5 Security RobotAs the sun set on a warm November afternoon, a quartet of five-foot-tall, 300-pound shiny white robots patrolled in front of Building 1 on Microsoft’s Silicon Valley campus. Looking like a crew of slick Daleks imbued with the grace of Fred Astaire, they whirred quietly across the concrete in different directions, stopping and turning in place so as to avoid running into trash cans, walls, and other obstacles.The robots managed to appear both cute and intimidating. […]
+
11:24 AM | Shaking the topological cocktail of success
Take ultracold potassium atoms, place a honeycomb lattice of laser beams on top of them and shake everything in a circular motion: this recipe enabled ETH researchers to implement an idea for a new class of materials first proposed in 1988 in their laboratory.
+
11:18 AM | Nanomaterials play a central role in effort to protect water quality
Arizona State University engineers will work as part of a new national center for research and innovation in small- and medium-sized drinking water systems.
+
11:14 AM | Engineers efficiently 'mix' light at the nanoscale
Researchers have engineered a nanowire system that could pave the way for this ability, combining two light waves to produce a third with a different frequency and using an optical cavity to amplify the intensity of the output to a usable level.
+
11:10 AM | New Insights on Kondo Effect
Researchers visualized the electronic interactions of magnetic impurities in metals. In doing so, they discovered that the electron patterns which arise around magnetic foreign atoms as a result of the Kondo effect interact over greater distances than previously thought. The insights from the examination of a simple model system could be beneficial in understanding materials with complex electronic structures. (in German)
+
10:09 AM | NPL and U Manchester partnership to accelerate commercialisation of graphene
The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and The University of Manchester have signed a memorandum of understanding to help move the potential benefits of graphene closer to practical use, by accelerating the commercialisation of the remarkable 2D material.
+
8:29 AM | Graphene electrodes for simultaneous electrophysiology and neuroimaging
Studying the complex wiring of neural circuits and identifying the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other neurological disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors. These observations depend on high-resolution optical imaging and electrophysiological recording. Researchers have now developed a completely transparent graphene microelectrode that allows for simultaneous optical imaging and electrophysiological […]
+
8:15 AM | Industry partnership supports Australian production of next-generation photonics
An optical oscilloscope with 20 times the resolution of conventional electronics has been developed by the ARC Centre for ultrahigh bandwidth devices for optical systems (CUDOS) at the University of Sydney and the Australian National University.
+
8:10 AM | NIH award for cancer diagnosis with photoswitchable nanoparticles
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences researcher Vladimir Zharov recently was awarded a $1.5 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to investigate his diagnostic concept - 'in vivo reading written in blood' - with new stimuli-responsive nanoparticles circulating in blood.
+
8:05 AM | Switching on the future: Electronic switches on the molecular scale
A research team in Japan has shown that a molecular electronic switch with multi-conductance states (for example, high, medium and low states) is possible using a single quarter thiophene-based junction. In this new switch, the switching behavior is triggered by external mechanical force.
+
7:59 AM | Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction
Researchers have shown that small size pure graphene nanosheets may work as an effective catalyst for breaking oxygen molecules - a reaction, which is of importance in the operation of fuel cells and air batteries, both of which have the potential to power electronic devices, vehicles, aircrafts and equipment.
+
5:00 AM | Latest Supercomputers Enable High-Resolution Climate Models, Truer Simulation of Extreme Weather
Berkeley Lab researcher says climate science is entering a new golden age.
+
5:00 AM | Study at SLAC Explains Atomic Action in High-Temperature Superconductors
Results are first to suggest how to engineer even warmer superconductors with atom-by-atom control.
+
4:00 AM | Il problema delle pulsar ‘mancanti’ nel centro galattico
La regione centrale della Via Lattea è un luogo molto movimentato e affollato da gas, polvere, stelle e, sorprendentemente, di sistemi stellari binari che orbitano attorno al buco nero Sagittarius A*. Dato l’elevato numero di stelle, gli astronomi stimano che ce ne dovrebbero essere centinaia al termine della loro fase evolutiva. Ad oggi, però, gli scienziati […]
+
1:17 AM | Landing at the End of the Solar System
We’ve just landed our first-ever probe on the surface of a comet. Here’s what it means, and what we’ll learn.Continue reading on Medium »

November 12, 2014

+
8:59 PM | Super Cold Science
It was back in 1908 when helium was first liquefied, in the lab of a man named Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Like most physicists of the time, he was a man with a rather proud moustache. Blatant sexism of the early 20th century notwithstanding, the liquefaction of helium was a pretty significant technical and scientific achievement. […]
+
7:43 PM | Podcast: Journey to the Center of the Earth
What do earthquakes, the moon, and the earth’s magnetic field have in common? They’re all connected to the iron core deep inside our planet.On this week's podcast, join me on a journey to the center of the earth. First, Planetary Science Professor Raymond Jeanloz from the University of California Berkeley will guide us through the iron catastrophe, the event that formed the earth’s core. Surprisingly, it has a lot of do with the planetary impact that chipped the moon from […]
+
3:57 PM | Single molecular switch may contribute to major aging-related diseases
Blocking effects of nitric oxide on SIRT1 protein could disrupt inflammation associated with diabetes, atherosclerosis, Parkinson’s disease A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified what appears […]
+
3:00 PM | At the edge of the cliff: no new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant bacteria
The Ebola outbreak has brought the fear of a viral pandemic to the headlines once more, as it happened before with the avian or swine […] Read more The post At the edge of the cliff: no new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant bacteria appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Is sunbathing addictive? The perfume of chemokines: how cancer manipulates our defenses Shear-driven drug delivery service
Editor's Pick
+
2:53 PM | OLED devices for lab-on-a-chip-applications
Fraunhofer FEP presents latest approaches to fabricate OLED devices for lab-on-a-chip-applications using either near UV electroluminescence or optically modulated green light to stimulate fluorescent dye markers.
+
2:49 PM | Patent awarded for genetics-based nanotechnology against mosquitoes, insect pests
U.S. Patent 8,841,272, 'Double-Stranded RNA-Based Nanoparticles for Insect Gene Silencing', was recently awarded to the Kansas State University Research Foundation.
+
2:44 PM | New materials for more powerful solar cells
Applying a thin film of metallic oxide significantly boosts the performance of solar panel cells. Researchers have developed a new class of materials comprising elements such as bismuth, iron, chromium, and oxygen. These multiferroic materials absorb solar radiation and possess unique electrical and magnetic properties.
2345678910
736 Results