Posts

January 27, 2015

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10:55 AM | Carbon nanoballs can greatly contribute to sustainable energy supply
Researchers have discovered that the insulation plastic used in high-voltage cables can withstand a 26 per cent higher voltage if nanometer-sized carbon balls are added. This could result in enormous efficiency gains in the power grids of the future, which are needed to achieve a sustainable energy system.
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10:08 AM | Astronomers find colossal ring system putting Saturn’s to shame
An astronomy professor at the University of Leiden, Ignas Snellen,called brown dwarfs ‘failed stars‘ because they were too heavy to be typical planets (13-75 times as heavy as Jupiter) and too light to sustain the fusion of hydrogen into helium. As a result, they exist in a limbo in astronomers’ textbooks, with the precise mechanism […]
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9:29 AM | Peptide nanoparticle delivery of oligonucleotide drugs into cells
Therapeutic oligonucleotide analogs represent a new and promising family of drugs that act on nucleic acid targets such as RNA or DNA; however, their effectiveness has been limited due to difficulty crossing the cell membrane. A new delivery approach based on cell-penetrating peptide nanoparticles can efficiently transport charge-neutral oligonucleotide analogs into cells.
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9:22 AM | 'Bulletproof' battery: Kevlar membrane for safer, thinner lithium rechargeables
New battery technology should be able to prevent the kind of fires that grounded Boeing 787 Dreamliners in 2013. The innovation is an advanced barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery.
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8:00 AM | It Was Good
Let there be light! Celebrating the theory of electromagnetism There was also another controversy raging at the time, concerning the nature of light. It was known that light travelled through space with a finite speed, rather than leaping instantaneously from its source to our eyes. But no-one knew, a century-and-a-half ago, what light was actually [...]
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5:00 AM | New Pathway of Valleytronics
A potential avenue to quantum computing currently generating quite the buzz in the high-tech industry is “valleytronics,” in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors.
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4:00 AM | Due ‘nani’ al di là di Nettuno
Gli astronomi hanno speso decenni a discutere l’esistenza di qualche pianeta trans-plutoniano nel nostro Sistema Solare. Oggi, però, dopo una serie di simulazioni numeriche, gli scienziati hanno trovato degli indizi che punterebbero all’esistenza di almeno due pianeti nani ben nascosti al di là di Plutone la cui influenza gravitazionale influenzerebbe le orbite e la strana … Continue reading Due ‘nani’ al di là di Nettuno →
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2:30 AM | Rosetta’s comet sheds its coat for warmer times
Fascinating things are happening to the world’s most-watched comet, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, as it approaches the Sun. A new study from NASA and ESA scientists published in Nature reports that by January 20, 67P shed a crust of dust built up on its surface over the last four years. In fact, by the end of January – about a week from […]
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2:12 AM | Fly, Fly Away
Tonight’s bedtime stories included two books involving flying characters: Foo, the Flying Frog of Washtub Pond (in which the title character gets blown into the sky by a gust of wind), and The Magic Brush. The latter is a dead-grandparent book, but ends with a cheerful picture of the kids reunited with their grandfather in…
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2:10 AM | Why does sodium react so explosively with water?
In January 1947, the American War Assets Administration dumped drums of sodium left over after the end of World War II into Lake Lenore in eastern Washington state. A video of the event – it really was an event – is available from the Internet Archive. Sodium’s reaction with water – or most other substances in […]
Editor's Pick

January 26, 2015

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11:00 PM | Natural Breakdown of Petroleum Underground Can Lace Arsenic into Groundwater
In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the […]
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10:41 PM | Study: Bad middle managers are just a reflection of their bosses
Keeping middle managers happy with their supervisors is the key to retaining the lower-level workers they manage and avoiding expensive turnover costs, according to a Vanderbilt University study. “Middle managers’ […]
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10:32 PM | Scientists take big step in making graphene a viable silicon substitute
A new study moves the wonder material graphene a major step closer to knocking silicon off as the dominant workhorse of the electronics industry. While silicon is ubiquitous in semiconductors and […]
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10:17 PM | Scientists find fish in extreme environment half-mile beneath Antarctic ice
Using a specially designed hot-water drill to cleanly bore through a half mile of ice, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded team of researchers has become the first ever to reach […]
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10:14 PM | ‘Total cost of ownership’ information gives hybrid, plug-in vehicles a boost
Sales of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles have slumped, but new Indiana University research shows some consumers are more likely to buy when they see data that shows the total […]
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10:13 PM | Research implicates metabolic process of the liver in the spread of colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is a cancer on the move: about 50 percent of patients with the disease see their cancer spread, typically to the liver. By identifying genes that become activated […]
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10:11 PM | Evidence-based care eliminates racial disparity in colon cancer survival rates
For the past two decades, the National Cancer Institute has documented a persistent racial disparity in colon cancer survival rates in the United States. African-American patients have consistently had lower […]
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9:35 PM | Research team shapes future of combat rations
What kinds of rations might the military be using to feed its warfighters 15 years from now? Seeking to provide a window into the future of combat feeding, the Consumer […]
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9:27 PM | Satellite witnesses developing US nor’easter
National Weather Service forecasters have been tracking a low pressure area that moved from the Midwest into the Atlantic Ocean today, and is expected to become a strong nor’easter that […]
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9:25 PM | Beating the clock: UGA researchers develop new treatment for rabies
Successfully treating rabies can be a race against the clock. Those who suffer a bite from a rabid animal have a brief window of time to seek medical help before […]
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8:31 PM | Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers
Researchers have come up with methods to manipulate natural proteins so that they self-assemble into amyloid fibrils.
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8:25 PM | Researchers use oxides to flip graphene conductivity
By demonstrating a new way to change the amount of electrons that reside in a given region within a piece of graphene, scientists have a proof-of-principle in making the fundamental building blocks of semiconductor devices using the 2D material.
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7:53 PM | Why wormholes (probably) don’t exist
A lot of science fiction plot devices are devoted to getting around the speed of light. In the real Universe, nothing with mass can travel faster than light, which means we can’t travel to distant stars without taking decades, centuries, or longer in transit. So, sci-fi draws from teleportation, hyperdrive, warp drive, and the ultimate […]
Editor's Pick
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5:11 PM | Eureka on “Inquiry”
While I’ve managed to generate a lot of blog traffic talking about football, I sort of suck at turning that into book sales. Sigh. I am, however, continuing to do interviews in support of Eureka: discovering Your Inner Scientist, the most recent of which is this one with WICN’s Inquiry, hosted by Mark Lynch. This…
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5:00 PM | A Tour of IYL 2015
To recognize the start of IYL, the Chandra X-ray Center is releasing a collection of images that combine data from telescopes tuned to different wavelengths of light.
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4:47 PM | Solid or liquid - the nanoparticle size matters
Researchers elucidate how the phase state of aerosol nanoparticles depends on their size.
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4:33 PM | Inside the Global Effort to Track Mysterious Space Radio Signals
Astronomers are building a global collaboration to identify recently discovered radio blips seemingly originating from deep space. Called "fast radio bursts," or FRBs for short, these enigmatic cosmic signals have so far confounded astronomers, and are the subject of a growing effort to track and observe them.An artist's rendition of the Parkes telescope observing a cosmic radio signal.Image: Swinburne Astronomy Productions.A lot of questions surround the origins of these strange signals, […]
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4:22 PM | Mostly Mute Monday: The Cat’s-Eye Nebula
The future of stars like our own, in a story only pictures can tell.Continue reading on Medium »
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4:02 PM | la tartaruga che disegna sulla sabbia
I laboratori svizzeri del programma Disney Research, dopo la ricerca sugli occhi continuano a sfornare innovazioni. In questo caso ecco un piccolo robottino a forma di tartaruga in grado di disegnare sulla sabbia varie forme e in maniera completamente autonoma, partendo da alcuni modelli caricati nella sua memoria.via Popular Science
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3:20 PM | Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age
Researchers observed a molecular shuttle powered by kinesin motor proteins and found it to degrade when operating, marking the first time, they say, that degradation has been studied in detail in an active, autonomous nanomachine.
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