Posts

September 13, 2014

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9:15 AM | Physics Week in Review: September 13, 2014
This week on Virtually Speaking Science, I chatted with Caltech’s Spiros Michalakis about quantum computing, quantum information, and when we might expect Google to have a quantum computer... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:00 AM | Towards Other Earths II. The Star-Planet Connection
The study of extrasolar planets is one of the most active areas of research of modern astronomy. The number of discoveries attests for the importance of a topic that reaches out and captivates the imagination of scientists and public alike. Central to this research is the characterization of the planet’s host star properties. Several reasons […]
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5:00 AM | The Role of Hydrogen in the Evolution of Galaxies
As the most abundant element in the Universe, hydrogen is an ubiquitous tracer of structures at various scales and plays a fundamental role in galaxy formation. Accretion of hydrogen from the intergalactic medium (IGM) feeds galaxies with the raw material necessary for the formation of stars. Environmental effects and complex internal mechanisms, such as supernovae […]

September 12, 2014

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8:36 PM | Will the Higgs Boson Destroy the Universe?
Improbable as it may seem, this question has been pinging around the Internet a lot this past week, because of a mix of Stephen Hawking and shameless sensationalism. Life is short (with or without the help of the Higgs), so I’ll answer it as succinctly as I can. No. If you want to get technical, […]The post Will the Higgs Boson Destroy the Universe? appeared first on Out There.
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8:35 PM | Weekly Space Hangout - 12 Sept 2014
On this episode of the Weekly Space Hangout, I chat with Fraser Cain and the crew about whether our universe will collapse (!!), Rosetta's new selfie, China's space station, and much more. Check it out!
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7:36 PM | Leggere Lolita a Teheran
Un po' di anni fa mi parlarono molto bene di questo libro ma non lo presi subito, e me ne dimenticai. L'anno scorso mi ritornò in mente e lo misi nella mia lista dei desideri: desiderio realizzato!Il libro inizia con un incontro segreto, un seminario letterario al quale partecipano 7 donne. Viene organizzato dalla protagonista (e scrittrice) del libro a casa sua, dove possono sentirsi libere di non coprirsi con il velo e sfoggiare colori e accessori, sentirsi libere di essere sé […]
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4:00 PM | Milky Way not the only galaxy low on lithium
Let's step back more than 13.7 billion years.  It's just minutes after the Big Bang and virtually all the matter that will ever exist is in the process of being formed.  Two elements dominate them all: about 3 out of every 4 atoms formed are hydrogen and virtually all the rest are helium.  The only other stable element created, lithium, was produced at a rate ten billion times lower.  It seems like a tiny amount, but the quantity we see out there in our galaxy is even lower […]
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3:44 PM | Stanford-led study assesses the environmental costs and benefits of fracking
A strange thing happened on the way to dealing with […]
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3:42 PM | New Family of Materials for Energy-Efficient Information Storage and Processing
Switching the polarity of a magnet using an electric field […]
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3:41 PM | Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of PTSD
A new study from the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds […]
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3:41 PM | Pebbly Space Particles May Kick-start Formation Of Planets And Stars
Curiously large dust grains may contribute to development of bodies in space.   The Orion Nebula, courtesy of NASAInterstellar space can be a dusty place, filled with tiny flecks no bigger than a bacterial cell.But now astronomers have detected particles as big as pebbles, possibly a previously unknown type of dust that may kick-start the production of planets. The presence of these big particles may also suggest that star formation is more efficient than previously thought.Astronomers […]
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3:35 PM | In the beginning there were three elements
In the beginning, or at least following the Big Bang […]
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3:34 PM | Study suggests changes in farming practices can save evolutionary diversity
A new study by biologists at Stanford University and UC […]
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3:10 PM | Researchers say a major quake may occur off the coast of Istanbul.
When a segment of a major fault line goes quiet, […]
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3:09 PM | Physicists find a new way to push electrons around
Discovery might ultimately lead to new, more energy-efficient transistors and […]
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3:07 PM | Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
New math explains dynamics of fluid systems that mimic many […]
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3:06 PM | Ripples in ancient rock may be signs of early life
Take a walk along any sandy shoreline, and you’re bound […]
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2:59 PM | Scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical mystery
Magnetic reconnection in the Earth and sun’s atmospheres can trigger […]
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2:06 PM | Imminent Death of the Paper Book Predicted, .GIF at 11
I got a royalty statement yesterday for How to Teach [Quantum] Physics to Your Dog (it continues to sell steadily, which is very gratifying), which includes a breakdown of the sales in terms of different formats. That reminded me of a particular annoying quirk of many recent discussions of the state of modern publishing, which…
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2:00 PM | Optics meets genetics to unravel the brain: the case of sex and aggression
You have probably heard this sentence: “the brain is the most complex organ in the universe”. Let´s dive inside such assertion to get a deeper […] Read more The post Optics meets genetics to unravel the brain: the case of sex and aggression appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:A new type of spontaneous activity in the brain identified The (energetical) cost of having a brain 2D brain mapping: gene expression and spatial location
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1:04 PM | New family of materials for energy-efficient information storage and processing
This article briefly reviews a new family of multiferroic materials - hexagonal rare earth ferrites - that have been demonstrated ferroelectric and ferromagnetic simultaneously by experiments.
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12:26 PM | Fatherhood and Academia
Via a whole bunch of people on social media, there’s a new study of gender roles in academia, which the Washington Post headlines “Study: Male scientists want to be involved dads, but few are”. This is not inaccurate. Some quotes that jumped out at me: “Academic science doesn’t just have a gender problem, but a…
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12:25 PM | Understanding hydrogen uptake by a single palladium nanoparticle
Researchers have determined for the first time the mechanism by which nanometer-sized particles of palladium take up hydrogen. Because the properties of nanoparticles change greatly with their size, choosing the right types of nanoparticle allows you to fine-tune the properties of materials.
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9:27 AM | Aligned carbon nanotube/graphene sandwiches for high-rate lithium-sulfur batteries
Researchers consider the rational combination of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into three-dimensional hybrids an effective route to amplify the inherent physical properties at the macroscale. By in situ nitrogen doping and structural hybridization of carbon nanotubes and graphene, researchers have now successfully fabricated nitrogen-doped aligned carbon nanotube/graphene sandwiches. In this work, aligned CNTs and graphene layers were anchored to each other, constructing a sandwich-like […]
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7:58 AM | Mass producing super-thin films that can 'squeeze' electricity
The EU project PIEZOVOLUME focused on speeding the production of piezoelectric film material. The research team worked to develop high-volume production tools and methods that are expected to help make the high-tech devices and systems of the future faster, lighter and more efficient.
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7:51 AM | Moving silicon atoms in graphene with atomic precision (w/video)
An international collaboration of research teams has shown how an electron beam can move silicon atoms through the graphene lattice without causing damage. The research combines advanced electron microscopy with demanding computer simulations.
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6:30 AM | Liposome research meets nanotechnology to improve cancer treatment
In the race to find more effective ways to treat cancer, Boise State University biophysicist Daniel Fologea is working outside the rules of general mathematics that say one plus one equals two. In his world, one plus one adds up to a whole lot more.
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6:27 AM | Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
New math explains dynamics of fluid systems that mimic many peculiarities of quantum mechanics.
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6:12 AM | Physicists find a new way to push electrons around
Discovery might ultimately lead to new, more energy-efficient transistors and microchips.
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6:06 AM | A solution for tunable dyes
Modifying a common organic dye molecule results in tunable optical characteristics that can be changed by exposure to different chemical reagents and solvents.
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