Posts

December 19, 2014

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5:00 AM | First Direct Evidence that a Mysterious Phase of Matter Competes with High-Temperature Superconductivity
SLAC study shows “pseudogap” phase hoards electrons that might otherwise conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
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5:00 AM | Ultrafast Imaging of Complex Systems in 3-D at Near Atomic Resolution Becoming Increasingly Possible
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory developed an extended Monte Carlo computational scheme that for the first time includes bound-bound resonant excitations that dramatically enhance ionization rates and can lead to an unexpectedly high degree of electron stripping
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4:00 AM | Quando due galassie collidono
Durante il periodo natalizio, sappiamo che le luci sono le protagoniste assolute che allietano le serate notturne. Ma anche nel cosmo, da qualche parte a circa 130 milioni di anni-luce dalla Terra nella direzione della costellazione del Cane Maggiore, possiamo assistere ad uno spettacolo simile: stiamo parlando di una coppia di galassie a spirale interagenti … Continue reading Quando due galassie collidono →
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2:08 AM | Chandra Weighs Most Massive Galaxy Cluster in Distant Universe
A newly discovered galaxy cluster is the most massive one ever detected with an age of 800 million years or younger. Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have accurately determined the mass and other properties of this cluster, as described in our latest press release. This is an important step in understanding how galaxy clusters, the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity, have evolved over time. A composite image shows the distant and massive […]
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1:06 AM | Mix of Bacteria in Gut May Depend More on Diet than Genes
Genes are important, but diet may be even more important in determining the relative abundance of the hundreds of health-shaping bacterial species comprising an individual’s gut microbiota, according to UC […]
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1:04 AM | Breastfeeding past two months helps babies avoid obesity
Infants at risk for childhood and adult obesity have a better chance of not becoming overweight if breastfeeding continues beyond two months, nutritional scientists at Cornell have discovered. “Children at […]

December 18, 2014

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10:25 PM | Effective Sample Size
Yet another place where the concept of magnitude turns up: the statistical notion of effective sample size.
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9:25 PM | Throwback Thursday: Top 6 facts about the solstice
As the year draws to an end and the nights reach their extremes, enjoy these six amazing facts that you probably don’t know!Continue reading on Medium »
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7:38 PM | Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough
If data could instead be encoded without current it would require much less energy, and make things like low-power, instant-on computing a ubiquitous reality. Researchers have made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.
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7:30 PM | Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life
Two billion year-old water pockets and a revised deep hydrogen content are good news for Earth’s vast subsurface biosphere, and could offer clues to life on Mars and much further beyond.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:09 PM | Creation of 'Rocker' protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine
Human cells are protected by a largely impenetrable molecular membrane, but researchers have built the first artificial transporter protein that carries individual atoms across membranes, opening the possibility of engineering a new class of smart molecules with applications in fields as wide ranging as nanotechnology and medicine.
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6:54 PM | Researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity
Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity.
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6:49 PM | Bringing oxides into the visible realm
New method to reduce the optical band gap of strontium titantate thin films.
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6:42 PM | Eureka: Radio, Radio
Two radio appearances upcoming as I continue to promote Eureka: Discovering Your Inner Scientist: — Tomorrow, Friday the 19th, I’ll be going down to WAMC around 11am to be on Roundtable, talking with Joe Donahue. This will be live, but fairly short. This is available on a whole host of stations in the not-The-City part…
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6:33 PM | Revealing the quantum geometry of the graphene lattice
Team realizes an Aharonov-Bohm type interferometer to measure the band topology in graphene type lattices.
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5:21 PM | Black Hole Fingerprints: Help Radio Galaxy Zoo Reach Its 1 Millionth Classification
The long winter nights are upon us — what better way to pass the evening than by doing your bit for science? Best part is, you can still watch that favorite holiday movie.Last week we featured a podcast all about the power of citizen scientists helping to analyze very large datasets.This week, I want to highlight one such citizen science project that just celebrated its one year anniversary! This project is known as Radio Galaxy Zoo, a title that you might recognize from the very […]
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4:42 PM | Multiferroic heroics put instant-on computing in sight
Reseaerchers have made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.
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4:41 PM | Stop telling boys to go into STEM
Stereotyping is always a bad thing, and most people don’t realize that men suffer just as badly from stereotypes as women. Let’s look at science: there has been a ton of work going into how to attract girls and women into scientific endeavors, particularly those that are very math-intensive.  Much of the discussion centers on […]
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4:36 PM | Scientists identify metal organic framework candidates for methane storage
Cars that run on natural gas are touted as efficient and environmentally friendly, but getting enough gas onboard to make them practical is a hurdle. A new study led by researchers at Rice University promises to help.
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4:00 PM | Welcome, Qiaochu!
Qiaochu Yuan joins us as a host of the Café.
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3:57 PM | Research aims to improve rechargeable batteries by focusing on graphene oxide paper
An engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.
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3:47 PM | Carbon nanotubes enable new way of sound generation
Carbon nanotube assemblies enabled design of a hybrid thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer with unique sound generation features that are not available from conventional diaphragm and thermo-acoustic speakers. New work describes a hybrid thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer (TEMST) fabricated using highly porous multi-walled carbon nanotube sheet that was placed in the proximity of a permanent magnet. Upon electrical AC excitation, thermal response of the material is combined with […]
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3:21 PM | Advent Calendar of Science Stories 18: Third Time’s the Charm
The winter solstice holidays are a time for family and togetherness, so building off yesterday’s post about the great Marie Skłodowska Curie, we’ll stay together with her family. Specifically her daughter Irène Joliot-Curie and her husband Frédéric. The Joliot-Curies are possible answers to a number of Nobel Prize trivia questions– only mother and daughter to…
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3:15 PM | Expectant fathers experience prenatal hormone changes
Impending fatherhood can lower two hormones–testosterone and estradiol–for men, even before their babies are born, a new University of Michigan study found. Other studies indicate that men’s hormones change once […]
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3:14 PM | Wild blueberries (bilberries) can help tackle the adverse effects of a high-fat diet
Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have […]
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2:44 PM | Study Hints that Ancient Earth Made Its Own Water—Geologically
Evidence that rock circulating in the mantle feeds world’s oceans even today A new study is helping to answer a longstanding question that has recently moved to the forefront of […]
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2:42 PM | Healthy brain development balanced on edge of a cellular ‘sword’
A new Yale-led study of children with neurodevelopmental abnormalities of the brain identifies a “cutting” enzyme crucial to the shaping and division of brain cells as well as the replenishment […]
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2:36 PM | Probing bacterial resistance to a class of natural antibiotics
Antimicrobial peptides are a distinctive class of potent, broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by the body’s innate immune system – the first line of defense against disease-causing microbes. In a new study, […]
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2:32 PM | Stem cells faulty in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
In a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle stem cells express connective-tissue genes associated with fibrosis and muscle weakness, according to a new study. Like human patients, mice with […]
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2:28 PM | Fine particulate air pollution linked with increased autism risk
Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy—particularly during the third trimester—may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers […]
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