Posts

April 28, 2015

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5:04 PM | Einstein and Revolution
As mentioned over the weekend, I gave a talk last week for UCALL, part of a series on “The Radical Early 20th Century.” I talked about how relativity is often perceived as revolutionary, but isn’t really, while Einstein’s really revolutionary 1905 paper is often overlooked. And, having put the time into thinking about the subject,…
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4:59 PM | A light touch to reading electron spins
Scientists have shown a new way of reading electron spins, which eliminates the need for powerful magnetic fields and reduces the reliance on very low temperatures.
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4:53 PM | Tracking exploding lithium-ion batteries in real-time
What happens when lithium-ion batteries overheat and explode has been tracked inside and out for the first time by researchers using sophisticated 3D imaging.
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4:45 PM | Research opens the way to living implants
Researchers have found a method that allows them to ensure that living cells - in this case bacteria from the human body - can be incorporated in materials while maintaining their mobility. This opens the way to a wide range of new applications, for example as part of medical implants.
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3:12 PM | Stopping HIV in its tracks with sub-dermal implant
Is the end of HIV near? Findings published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy report that a novel, subdermal implant delivering potent antiretroviral (ARV) drugs shows extreme promise in […]
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3:10 PM | New material for creating artificial blood vessels
Blocked blood vessels can quickly become dangerous. It is often necessary to replace a blood vessel – either by another vessel taken from the body or even by artificial vascular […]
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3:10 PM | Heat makes electrons’ spin in magnetic superconductors
Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. The result was published yesterday […]
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3:09 PM | Would you rather work for Megatron or Optimus Prime?
New research by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Peter Harms shows there is more than meets the eye when it comes to the impact of Saturday morning cartoons. The research examines […]
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3:08 PM | Early separation of cow and calf has long-term effects on social behavior
Drinking milk is a big tradition in Austria. The country produces 3.4 million tons of milk a year. To help achieve this volume, dairy cows are typically separated from their […]
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3:07 PM | Embracing the 5G era
To meet the demands of 2020, the 5G research has attracted global attention and made remarkable progress. 5G will be the first meaningful unified wideband mobile communication system. A recent […]
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3:06 PM | Quantum particles at play: Game theory elucidates the collective behavior of bosons
Quantum particles behave in strange ways and are often difficult to study experimentally. Using mathematical methods drawn from game theory, physicists of Ludwig-Maximilias-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown how bosons, […]
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3:06 PM | Living liver donors report lower sexual function in early months post-surgery
A new study found that sexual function in adult living donors was lower at the evaluation phase and at three months following liver transplantation. Results published in Liver Transplantation, a […]
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2:57 PM | The 'Silly Walk' of a Motor Protein is Revealed
Monty Python's Ministry of Silly Walks has a new addition: the pivoting gait of a motor protein that transports cargo throughout the cell. This walk has been imaged by researchers at the University of Oxford, who first had to develop a new high-speed imaging technique.Cells rely on a transport system to move cargo in, out, and around the cell. This intracellular highway is made up of long protein chains known as actin filaments. Motor proteins such as myosin 5a walk along the actin […]
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2:26 PM | Windows that act like an LCD screen
A newly developed light shutter may pave the way for see-through displays and smart windows.
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2:21 PM | New technique for exploring structural dynamics of the nanoworld
A hybrid approach allows ultrafast EM analysis of materials, showing tiny electronic changes in individual atoms within a material on ultrafast time scales.
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2:15 PM | L'entropia di un documento
Il linguaggio è stato ed è tutt'ora un campo di interesse anche per logici e matematici (in questo senso il più noto tra tutti è sicuramente Ludwig Wittgenstein). Nel 1959 il linguista George Kingsley Zipf diffuse la legge che prende il suo nome, la legge di Zipf, nonostante non ne fosse lo scopritore(1): essa stabilisce che dato un qualche corpo di enunciati in un linguaggio naturale, la frequenza di ogni parola è inversamente proporzionale al suo rango nella […]

Shannon C.E. (1948). A Mathematical Theory of Communication, Bell System Technical Journal, 27 (3) 379-423. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/j.1538-7305.1948.tb01338.x

Shannon C.E. (1951). Prediction and Entropy of Printed English, Bell System Technical Journal, 30 (1) 50-64. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/j.1538-7305.1951.tb01366.x

Yavuz D. (1974). Zipf's law and entropy (Corresp.), IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 20 (5) 650-650. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tit.1974.1055269

Citation
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2:14 PM | A new constitutive model for the thermo-elasto-plasticity deformation of crystals
Researchers have proposed a new thermo-elasto-plasticity constitutive model based on the interatomic potential and solid mechanics for metal crystals. Through this new model, the material behavior at different temperatures could be described accurately and conveniently.
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1:51 PM | 3D-printed graphene for electronic and biomedical applications
From a 3D printing perspective, graphene has been previously incorporated into 3D printed materials, but most of these constructs comprise no greater than about 20 volume % of the total solid of the composite, resulting in electrical properties that are significantly less than what has been achieced in new work. Here, researchers show that high volume fraction graphene composite constructs can be formed from an easily extrudable liquid ink into multi-centimeter scaled objects.
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1:40 PM | When mediated by superconductivity, light pushes matter million times more
When a mirror reflects light, it experiences a slight push. This radiation pressure can be increased considerably with the help of a small superconducting island.
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11:46 AM | Atomic Force Microscopy Workshop 'Quantitative nanomechanics with High Speed'
Bruker invites you to the Atomic Force Microscopy Workshop 'Quantitative nanomechanics with High Speed' which will take place in the Bruker Netherlands Office on Tuesday 12th May 2015 in Leiderdorp.
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11:00 AM | The Long View...
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.Topics: #BlackLivesMatter, Baltimore, Civil Rights, CommentaryI really get the anger. I've penned it on the anniversary of the surrender of the South in the Civil War, and the needless death of Walter Scott. Dr. King once said: "a riot is the language of the unheard." That I think assumes you've tried - through legitimate means - to have your voice heard.You seem to have a rich history of rioting: 1812; 1868. If you must get angry: why didn't you ask why the […]
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8:30 AM | Random light scattering enhances the resolution of wide-field optical microscope images
Researchers have developed a method to improve the resolution of a conventional wide-field optical microscope. Scattered light usually reduces the resolution of conventional optical microscopes. The team however found a simple and efficient way to actively use scattered light to improve the resolution of images.
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4:00 AM | La (non) costanza della velocità della luce
La velocità della luce, indicata col simbolo “c”, è una delle ben note costanti della natura. Tuttavia, in alcune teorie cosmologiche alternative, la velocità della luce non è in realtà costante bensì essa varia nel tempo e nello spazio. I dati osservativi a favore di questa ipotesi mancano, ma in un nuovo articolo apparso su Physical … Continue reading La (non) costanza della velocità della luce →
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4:00 AM | Energy Department to Provide $75 Million for ‘Fuels from Sunlight’ Hub
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Energy today announced $75 million in funding to renew the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), a DOE Energy Innovation Hub originally established in 2010 with the goal of harnessing solar energy for the production of fuel.
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4:00 AM | ALCF Supercomputer Helps Identify Materials to Improve Fuel Production
With access to supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility, a research team from the University of Minnesota and Rice University has demonstrated a predictive modeling capability that can help accelerate the discovery of new materials to improve biofuel and petroleum production.
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4:00 AM | Galaxy-Gazing Telescope Sensors Pass Important Vision Tests
Results give scientists additional confidence that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will detect effects of dark matter and dark energy.

April 27, 2015

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8:01 PM | Five things scientists could learn with their new, improved...
Five things scientists could learn with their new, improved particle acceleratorThe world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been undergoing two years of upgrades. Now, particles are zipping around its ring once again, and scientists will start colliding particles this summer. Here are five things scientists hope to learn from the new, improved LHC:1. Does the Higgs boson hold any surprises?Now that we’ve found the Higgs boson, […]
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7:42 PM | Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe
Astrophysicists have created a 3D map of the universe that spans nearly two billion light years and is the most complete picture of our cosmic neighbourhood to date. The spherical […]
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5:17 PM | Brain balances perception and action when caught in an illusion
Two wrongs can make a right, at least in the world of visual perception and motor functioning, according to two University of Oregon brain scientists. In a two-experiment study, published […]
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5:12 PM | U.S. Dept. of Agriculture awards $3.8 million in grants for nanotechnology research
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced more than $3.8 million in funding to support grants focused on using nanotechnology to find solutions to societal challenges such as food security, nutrition, food safety, and environmental protection.
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