Posts

March 26, 2015

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4:00 AM | The Dawn of DUNE
The neutrino experiment formerly known as LBNE has transformed. Since January, its collaboration has gained about 50 new member institutions, elected two new spokespersons and chosen a new name: Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, or DUNE.
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4:00 AM | Researchers Use Mira to Peer Inside High-temperature Superconductors
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) are using supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, to shed light on the mysterious nature of high-temperature superconductors.
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1:16 AM | Supertides are real!
The highest high tides occur once every 18 years, and can lead to surprising floods. Here’s the science behind them.Continue reading on Medium »

March 25, 2015

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7:57 PM | Researchers use nanoparticles to selectively target tumor cells in two cancer models
Nanoscientists study xenograft models of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
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7:47 PM | Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing with nanoparticles
Scientists have created a new chemical process that makes use of the widely available rare-earth metal cerium to improve the manufacture of nylon.
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7:42 PM | Desalination with nanoporous graphene membrane
Researchers have demonstrated an energy-efficient desalination technology that uses a porous membrane made of strong, slim graphene.
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5:53 PM | Podcast: How Robocats Land on Their Feet
The physics of “cat-turning” has been a subject of fascination for hundreds of years, in part because a cat’s almost uncanny ability to land on its feet seems, at first glance, to violate the conservation of angular momentum. “It sounds like a paradox when you first talk about it,” says Dr. Will Robertson of the University of Adelaide. “Obviously when the cat is falling, there’s no one else helping it to flip over in the air.” Images of a […]
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5:33 PM | Thousands of atoms entangled with a single photon
Result could make atomic clocks more accurate.
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5:29 PM | Snowflakes become square with a little help from graphene
The breakthrough findings allow better understanding of the counterintuitive behaviour of water at the molecular scale and are important for development of more efficient technologies including filtration, desalination and distillation.
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5:18 PM | Using viruses to help water blow off steam (w/video)
Researchers are using viral-biotemplating to make nanostructure coatings for studying their ability to enhance water boiling efficiency.
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4:28 PM | Engineer helps crack mystery of bird flight
It has taken more than a million fine samples of aerodynamic force and airflow combined to determine what makes a hummingbird’s wings so adept at hovering. The team led by […]
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4:27 PM | New process could yield better solar cells, faster chips
Computer chips, solar cells and other electronic devices have traditionally been based on silicon, the most famous of the semiconductors, that special class of materials whose unique electronic properties can […]
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4:26 PM | New kind of light bulb could save lives in developing countries
How many researchers does it take to change a light bulb? And how many lives could they save by changing it? The answer to both questions is larger than you […]
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4:24 PM | Discovery could lead to biological treatment for common birth defect
USC researchers have discovered which stem cells are responsible for the growth of craniofacial bones in mice — a finding that could have a profound impact on the understanding and […]
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4:22 PM | Saccharin shows promise as cancer inhibitor
For decades, saccharin was wrongly labeled as a possible cancer-causing chemical. Now, nearly 15 years after it was declared safe, University of Florida Health researchers have found that the artificial […]
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4:21 PM | Ocean acidification likely hampers tiny shell builders in Southern Ocean
A University of Colorado Boulder study shows a ubiquitous type of phytoplankton — tiny organisms that are the base of the marine food web – appears to be suffering from […]
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4:19 PM | Air Pollutants During Pregnancy Can Damage Child’s Brain, Up Risk of Cognitive, Behavioral Problems
Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues at the University of Southern California have found a powerful relationship […]
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3:51 PM | Louis Nirenberg, the geometry and the Abel Prize
http://t.co/rTEYZLbVDZ by @ulaulaman about #AbelPrize #LouisNirenberg Great news: John Nash and Louis Nirenberg win the Abel Prize for 2015: The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” The President of the Academy, Kirsti […]
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3:14 PM | The science of three-parent children
2015 has already been a significant year in the field of human medicine as February saw the UK become the first country in the world to legalise the generation of so-called 'three-parent' children. This marks a milestone for preventative genetics and embryology and offers hope to many people around the UK and beyond who would be unable to have healthy children otherwise. The votes to bring this into law were fairly comfortably won by those in favour - 382 vs 128 in the House of Commons (the […]
Editor's Pick
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3:10 PM | Fuel cells in the spotlight
In-situ, dynamic X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to demystify the behavior of catalysts in fuel cells.
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3:00 PM | The secrets behind chameleon’s skin coloration change
Color patterns are important features of lots of animals, having key functions in protection against UV irradiation, camouflage, shoaling or sexual selection. Color patterns […] Read more The post The secrets behind chameleon’s skin coloration change appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Non-trivial biological quantum effects Triassic lungs: Unidirectional flow in alligators’ breathing Quantum mechanics in biological systems (III): Magnetoception
Editor's Pick
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2:38 PM | Carbon nanotube fibers make superior links to brain
Carbon nanotube fibers may provide the best way to communicate directly with the brain. The fibers have proven superior to metal electrodes for deep brain stimulation and to read signals from a neuronal network. Because they provide a two-way connection, they show promise for treating patients with neurological disorders while monitoring the real-time response of neural circuits in areas that control movement, mood and bodily functions.
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2:08 PM | EPA proposes reporting and record keeping requirements on nanomaterials
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing one-time reporting and recordkeeping requirements on nanoscale chemical substances in the marketplace.
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1:36 PM | Nanorobotic agents open the blood-brain barrier, offering hope for new brain treatments
Magnetic nanoparticles can open the blood-brain barrier and deliver molecules directly to the brain, say researchers.
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11:55 AM | “Talking Dogs and Galileian Blogs” at Vanderbilt, Thursday 3/26/15
I mentioned last week that I’m giving a talk at Vanderbilt tomorrow, but as they went to the trouble of writing a press release, the least I can do is share it: It’s clear that this year’s Forman lecturer at Vanderbilt University, Chad Orzel, will talk about physics to almost anyone. After all, two of…
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11:30 AM | A Future We Cannot Avoid...
At City College of San Francisco, student Daniela Cardenas prepares DNA for analysis during the biotechnology module of Bio 11: Introduction to the Science of Living Organisms. This course was developed with funding from the NSF-ATE grant titled, "Incorporating Molecular Biology into the Undergraduate Curriculum."Credit: City College of San Francisco, Biology DepartmentTopics: African Americans, Diversity, Hispanic Americans, Jobs, STEM, Women in ScienceIn the U.S., almost half of all […]
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11:00 AM | Seeing Enterprise...
Relativistic spacecraft must interact with the cosmic microwave background in a way that produces a unique light signature.Topics: CMB, Einstein, NASA, Relativity, SETI, Quantum Cosmology, Spaceflight, SpacetimeTECHNOLOGY REVIEW: Interstellar travel may be the stuff of science fiction but it’s straightforward to calculate that it should be possible given the ability to travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light. These kinds of speeds may even be achievable with near future […]
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4:30 AM | Curious Bends – macaroni scandal, bilingual brain, beef-eating Hindus and more
1. The great macaroni scandal in the world began in Kerala “‘Only the upper class people of our larger cities are likely to have tasted macaroni, the popular Italian food. It is made from wheat flour and looks like bits of onion leaves, reedy, hollow, but white in colour.’ This paragraph appears in a piece titled: “Ta-Pi-O-Ca […]
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4:00 AM | Il collasso ‘imminente’ dell’Universo
Alcuni fisici hanno proposto un meccanismo secondo cui il nostro Universo terminerà ad un certo punto la sua espansione ed inizierà a collassare su sé stesso. I calcoli suggeriscono che tale collasso sia “imminente”, almeno su scale di tempo astronomiche, e potrà avvenire tra qualche decina di miliardi di anni. In un articolo pubblicato su … Continue reading Il collasso ‘imminente’ dell’Universo →
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4:00 AM | A Tale of Two Colliders, One Thesis, Two Awards—and a Physics Mystery
Results from two complementary colliders provide fodder for one double-award-winning Ph.D. thesis and an intriguing physics puzzle.
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